We will not forget.

 

Lovepiece – Community Performance & Discussion

Hosted by: Kamora’s Cultural Corner
1023 Albany Ave Hartford CT 06112
Friday, September 20th 2019
Arrive 7pm – Performance @ 7:30pm – Followed by a community discussion. Free!

Kamora’s Cultural Corner will host Arien Wilkerson/ TNMOT AZTRO for their premiere of a special version of their oeuvre “Lovepiece.” After the performance there will be a community conversation on queerness with topics drawn directly from the show. Tnmot Aztro and KCC are targeting black leaders in the North end on cultural competency in the queer community by inviting the public to have discourse and education on sex working, HIV, coming out in the POC community, queer violence, being queer and poor, and safety.

Be sure to catch Lovepiece – World Premiere – Quick Center for the Arts September 23rd 12noon, 3p.m., 7p.m.

Lovepiece, a 30-minute dance and multimedia installation, is about the work it takes to build a healthy relationship with yourself, uncovering the process of healing from rejection, hate, poverty, and humiliation within black/brown queer romantic relationships. Spontaneous, erotic, queer, open-ended, club and Latin American-inspired melodramas, paired with transgressive experiential outlooks on love, take the audience through the lens of queer people of color and their relationships, specifically the dichotomy between black and Latino queer relationships, and the exchange of queer culture. The work features an original live score from artist, domsentfrommars, Zach Rowden, Karim Rome, lighting collaborator Jon-Paul LaRoccoon and stage design by Joe McCarthy.

Kamora Herrington (Director of Kamora’s Cultural Corner)
“This is the perfect spot to do what I do! My personal mission is to create space so that families can love their children. Moving KCC into space with a history of welcoming marginalized communities into the larger Hartford community just makes sense! Opening with Arien’s show Loveplace could not be a more perfect collaboration, we are building a foundation of love and a desire for understanding. This piece and the conversation following will be a great starting point!”

This performance is sponsored by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven through a partnership with the Connecticut Office of the Arts. This Performance has also received funding from the CT Dance Alliance Jump Start Award & Our fabulous 50 premiere funders. ( These Tnmot Aztro patrons are vital to the shows premieres.)

Amber Stewart has a wonderful new article found on Th-ink Queerly. She begins her essay with a quote from our dear comrade Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore who had this to say.

“The radical potential of queer identity lies in remaining outside — in challenging and seeking to dismantle the sickening culture that surrounds us.” — Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

Here is what Amber has to say at the start of the essay:

“Getting ready to do some research, I pull a book down off my shelf. On it’s cover, a glitter-covered mouth, smeared lipstick, teeth barred in anger, or maybe determination. I open it, and three fliers advertising protests fall out, reminding me of a different time and place. I bought this book, That’s Revolting!: Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation, when I was in college, spending my Saturday mornings escorting patients into an abortion clinic, and Saturday nights giving and attending talks on the intersection of Marxism and feminism.

This is when my identity as a queer woman was forged.

It was not forged in the banquet halls of the Human Rights Campaign, but in the streets, protesting against police brutality, discriminatory immigration practices, and rape culture. We were asking, not just for equal pay for equal work, but for work to be redefined as a collective action, something that could benefit all of us, not just companies.

I was an idealist.

I wanted to agitate for queer rights, but for me, that meant calling for the passage of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (RIP). It meant making sure that same-sex couples could get green cards, regardless of their marriage status. It meant supporting the legalization of sex work.

What it did not mean was fighting for gay marriage.”

To read the rest of this article go to HERE.

Amber has this wonderful ending:

“So I’m lobbying for the “Q” to be removed from the acronym.

I want us to stop using “queer” as a catch-all. I do not ask this out of stubbornness or nostalgia, but because I believe it is important that the community keep space for outside the box thinking. I think it’s important that we have a term we can use when referring to something that is just ours. I think it’s important that we remember that we can still be full of radical potential.”

About Th-Ink Queerly

Th-ink Queerly is a LGBTQ+ thought leadership magazine that challenges the hegemonic status quo, disrupts prejudice, and demonstrates our vital role in society to improve humanity.
Note from the editor
Th-ink Queerly is grounded in self-examination and leadership. As LGBTQ+ people we harness our self-awareness to demonstrate our necessary role in society. We promote thoughtful dialogue that seeks to improve humanity and equal rights for all. We critique the status quo — challenging rigid doctrines, heteronormativity, patriarchy, bigotry, and radicalized ideologies — and offer solutions to create a more loving and accepting world. If you would like to contribute to Th-Ink Queerly, please review the “Submission” guidelines.

 

and while you are at it handle some poisonous snakes.

and some gay person whined, “But there are queer cops.” Hey honey get your politicks right. There maybe gay and lesbian cops or tools of the state but a queer wouldn’t be caught dead as a cop.

One of our readers who disagrees with us more than agrees once told punkpink to keep his big pink snout out of Hartford as pink left this area and move way up near the Canadian border to a small town in Vermont. Well answered punkpink I still come down to Hartford every few months stopping off on my way to NYC to visit Avery Jones, May Day and Cassey Role and I use to write for this publication and you can keep your dingy little nose out of my business. My, my said Sara that old punkpink sure can get rattled. Well here is a little something that punkpink wrote while visiting us awhile back, right before our big move out of town to the other side of the river. There is a war going on and it is a war for the very soul of the LGBTQ community. The lines are being drawn deep in the sand. Hopefully more folks than not will come to realize that the way we have been going about things is very small. So old pink is here to give a push.

Following the Rainbow Trinkets and Corporate Love in OUT CT Tribe.

by punkpink

So the trinket tribe has announced the publication of OUTINCT the yearly guide to everything pride in the capitol city Hartford. It seems to be a yearly publication out in June and remains until September when the annual Pride is held in Hartford Ct. Word to the wise while you sardine yourselves on little old Pratt Street watch out for the pickpockets, the let me bump your hot ass crowd, and the bloated heads of the organizers.

According to them: Why list your organization/business with OUTINCT.COM

“By supporting us you help provide opportunities to generate celebratory, cultural, artistic & educational events which affirm the lives of the LGBT+ community in Connecticut. Your support will spirit people and our allies through activities that will promote unity, inclusion, and awareness of sexual & gender diversity.”

It all depends where you are coming from. Whose culture? Whose artistic and educational events? What events?  

Here is the best one yet for subscribing and supporting the trinket tribe: Read the rest of this entry »

We have said many times before that Archives and Footnotes are wonderful things as one finds many truths in the archives and in the footnotes a chance to further ones interests and education. A case in point here is found in one of our footnotes, first found as a one liner in the book Stonewall and then researched in the Hartford area by Richard Nelson. One person who many of us in Connecticut do not know about is Ivan Valentin, performer, artist, and freedom fighter. Ivan was an early trailblazer and was a forceful catalyst for change here in Connecticut in 1975, a change that was needed and a change that we all can thank him for every time we see one of our drag sisters performing in a Ct. bar, (see footnote) and each time let us remember to shout out Ivan Valentin Presente’

This new piece, While Paris Was Burning, Hartford Sizzled, would not have been possible without the archives of Jerimarie Liesegang, the mother of the Ct. Trans movement. As Jeri was going through her archives preparing her collection for presentation to Central Ct. State University Equity and Diversity Collection she came upon an article written by Rebecca Boyden about the House of Pleasure. The House of Pleasure was one of the Houses that operated for a time in Hartford along with The House of Everlasting Empire, The House of Nations, The House of Freedom, the House of Flava, and The House of Ebony. In 1993 Hartford’s first drag ball, “Hartford Sizzles” spearheaded in part by the Hartford Gay and Lesbian Health Collective, and was held at the Project 100 Community Center. Other balls hosted by Houses were held from 1993-1997. The balls were not only a heck of a lot of fun but raised thousands of dollars over the years for HIV/AIDS organizations and other community groups.

Connecticut has a rich and long history in LGBTQ Advocacy and Activism. Yet we unfortunately do very little to document this amazing history, especially given the accessibility of the Internet and its archiving tools.  To this point, I (jerimarie) recall back in late 2003, I was chatting with Mucha at Tisane’s and he was relaying to me the Hartford Balls that were held in Hartford following a screening of When Paris Was Burning.  Having been a newcomer to the Greater Hartford area, I was not privy to this information and found his descriptions of the Balls utterly amazing.  I asked him if any of this was documented in detail and he said not really though he had VHS tapes of all the Balls.  So I said, let’s do a documentary on the balls so it can be preserved and be a historical archive for the community and allies.  So in late 2003 a project was born; and Jerimarie, her partner Anja, Mucha Mucha Placer the mother of the House of Pleasure and Kevin Smith produced a video of segments from the balls and interviews with the key participants to explain the balls and the categories created that were an important part of these events. The video was first shown at the Hartford Gay and Lesbian Film Festival in 2004. We dedicate this piece on furbirdsqueerly to Anja who left us all too soon and to all the folks who continued our communities stories.

Below are select images of some of the first ball participants:

Greta in her sunflower outfit. Read the rest of this entry »