Archive for the ‘Anti-queer’ Category

Last week, local media published Hartford Police Officer Kelly Baerga’s detailed report of extensive sexual harassment, homophobia, and sexism within the Hartford Police Department.
If this is how women and LGBTQ police officers are treated, how people in the community being treated?

Local news story: https://www.wfsb.com/…/article_7dea0622-3004-11e9-b027-9fbb…

Full report: https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/…/5c64da650011…

Statement of February 24, 2019 from HPD Not Safe For Women.

Today’s statement

Women in Hartford are not safe and the HPD is our biggest threat.

Officer Baerga is a woman and a Latina and a lesbian, she is one of us. She is a sworn police officer and she is not safe from sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior from Sgt. Rodney at the Hartford Police Department. She went through the proper channels to address her harassment, and those channels made it clear that their Old Boys club would not protect her or take her complaints seriously.

Today we ask, if a police officer is not safe, what about a woman who calls for help or police protection? What about a woman involved in an incident that police are called to? What if a woman is arrested? How safe will they be?

Sgt. Rodney needs to go. NOW! City Hall and the HPD have stretched this out for far too long, hoping that it will disappear. We demand a full and complete investigation of the entire Hartford Police Department and all unresolved sexual harassment complaints.
ALL OF THEM!! Investigate every internal complaint and every community complaint involving women. Go back at least five years. What is the process? Who investigates these complaints? What were the outcomes?

WHY DON’T WE KNOW THIS!

This is situation intolerable. Sgt. Rodney is today’s unfortunate example of what happens when City leadership choses to stand back in the face of abuse because it’s messy and uncomfortable. Welcome to Hartford, we are a beautifully diverse city of messy and uncomfortable. We demand better city leadership. We demand that those at the HPD who knew this was happening, gave Sgt. Rodney the space to abuse officer Baerga and have been dragging their feet since May, step down and allow our HPD to step into the 21st century.
The behavior of the HPD reflects what the Mayor and City Council are willing to allow. If they won’t demand that the HPD treat ALL women with respect, we will vote them ALL out in November!

For years, the Hartford Police Department has cultivated a culture of gender discrimination and homophobia that has allowed officers to abuse each other with almost no fear of retaliation.

For more on the movement in Hartford Ct. HPD Is Not Safe For Women go to their facebook page HERE.

Furbirdsqueerly is compiling a article on the history of ourstories and the interaction with HPD over the long years of our movement.

Looking guilty as hell.

Conservative Group hosts anti-transgender panel of ‘feminists from the left.’

By Tim Fitzsimons

The conservative Heritage Foundation, which has long advocated against LGBTQ rights, hosted a panel in Washington on Monday titled “The Inequality of the Equality Act: Concerns From the Left.” But instead of highlighting the left’s opposition to the Equality Act, which seeks to add LGBTQ protections to federal civil rights laws, all four panelists had one thing in common: They oppose transgender rights.

If gender identity becomes a protected class in federal civil rights law, there will be serious negative consequences,” Ryan T. Anderson, a senior research fellow at the foundation and the event’s moderator, said in his introduction. The increase in those identifying as transgender, he added, “has become an epidemic.”

Those invited by Heritage to share their “concerns from the left” included three women from the Women’s Liberation Front, or WoLF, a self-described radical feminist organization best known for its opposition to transgender rights, and Hacsi Horvath, an adjunct lecturer at the University of California, San Francisco, who formerly identified as transgender.

Throughout their hourlong discussion, the four panelists — at least two of them LGBTQ — shared similar views on transgender people and the rights many in the trans community are currently seeking. Horvath likened the trans rights movement to “the new eating disorder,” and Jennifer Chavez, a WoLF member, read from a letter that described increased transgender visibility and acceptance as “a social contagion all over the internet.” (more…)

 

A most chilling message has been erected on a billboard in Times Square in NYC. Here is the run down of what it is all about.

Surrounded by the skyscrapers that tower over Times Square, a new billboard went up this week that in large black letters reads: “NO GAYS ALLOWED.” Just below, a smaller message states: “STOP Alliance Defending Freedom. Learn more at NoGays.org.”

The billboard is part of a new campaign that aims to draw attention to the conservative Christian legal group Alliance Defending Freedom, or ADF, which has been labeled an anti-LGBTQ “hate group” by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a designation the group disputes. Since its founding nearly 25 years ago, ADF has been linked to efforts seeking to criminalize homosexuality, restrict transgender people’s access to sex-segregated facilities and permit businesses to deny service to LGBTQ people.

Caleb Cade, a spokesman for Citizens for Transparency, the advocacy group behind the campaign, said the powerful nonprofit law group has fought for years to undermine lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer rights, often behind the scenes.
“We want to remind people that there are still really insidious forces at work against our community,” Cade told NBC News. “ADF has been leading that war for a long time, with tens of millions of dollars to do it.”

For more on this go to LGBTQ Nations site found HERE.

These articles are a must read. The so called Alliance Defending Freedom is nothing more than a hate group involved with many cases against LGBT folks.

Needless to say, they are not our friends. Never have been and will never be. The Klu Klux Klan, the Neo Nazis, Proud Boys and all the other scum bags running around the world today terriorizing and targeting people must be stopped. LGBT people have a major role to play in joining with others to stop them whenever we hear they are marching. No all of us can not go out and confront them, but we must do something anything to stop them. When thousands of counter demonstrators come out and stand together they know, yes they know we will not accept them in our towns and cities. When thousands of counter demonstrators come out it sends a message to trump and his boys we do not accept them anywhere, not in the white house and not in our streets, not under sheets and not leaving leaflets at our homes.

Eighty-one years ago this month, on Nov. 15, 1937, a raid took place at La Paloma nightclub in an unincorporated part of Dade County (modern-day Miami-Dade County). Unlike at Stonewall, law enforcement was not behind this Miami-area raid. Instead, nearly two hundred women and men from the Ku Klux Klan—wearing long, white hooded robes that both concealed their identities and struck fear—burned a fiery cross on public property and inducted several dozen new members that night. They then stormed La Paloma, roughed up staff and performers, and ordered the nightspot closed. Local law enforcement conducted its own raid of La Paloma less than two weeks later. Yes as it is said many times by some of our freedom fighters, “Cops and Klan go hand in hand.”

What did the people of La Paloma do. According to Julio Capo Jr in his article Why a Forgotten 1937 KKK Raid on a Gay Club in Miami Still Matters 80 yrs. Later, has this to say: “In the long run, however, the raid had unintended consequences. It ultimately helped build community among those whom law enforcement could harass and arrest for wearing clothes not associated with their sex, for vagrancy, for lewd and lascivious behavior, or for any other of the broad charges they used to criminalize queer people during the era. The club became a site of resistance against the city’s conservative forces.” ( 1 )

It is also clear that the history of the KKK is not only a story of eighty-one years ago either. In Charlottesville, Va., the KKK joined other white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups in public rallies. Their hate-filled slurs targeted Blacks, immigrants, Jews, and LGBT people. The Nazi’s bedfellows of the KKK marched through the streets of Hartford Ct. and Proud Boys were on the New Haven Green. (Chased off by Freedom Fighters) Make no mistake about it LGBTQ folks are a target just as wells as Blacks, Muslims, Jews, Immigrants, People of Color, Women, Leftists, and anyone who doesn’t fit their narrow definition of what Amerikkk is or how they wish it to be. (more…)

This timeline was created in 1998-1999 for the exhibition, Challenging and Changing America. It has been revised and updated for publication in 2018.

Challenging and Changing America
The Struggle for
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
Civil Rights 1900-1999

pink and black

INTRODUCTION
Challenging and Changing America
The Struggle for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Civil Rights
1900-1999

As many of us know from history the Pink Triangle was used by the National Socialist German Workers’ Party (Nazis) to mark homosexual men in the concentration camps of Europe. The Black Triangle was used to mark Lesbians as asocial. In the late 1970s Gay and Lesbian activists reclaimed the Pink and Black Triangle and these were worn pointed up to show not only pride but a reminder of oppression and our victory over the oppressors.

These two symbols are used on the front of this publication to remind us that even though many of our stories have been of oppression and setbacks, that we as a people, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and the many others who find a home under our umbrella have strongly defended our right to exist and to exist freely no matter what the obstacles or barricades straight society has thrown up. We stand up, out and proud! This timeline proves that we as a people will continue to do so. We turn the Pink and Black Triangles point up! The timeline is dedicated to all of our people. To our people who dare to say no and by doing so say yes to life and to establishing and building a more just society for all.
This timeline celebrates our victories and our peoples as we have thrown off the straight jackets, the reading between the lines, the masks and the fears that society has placed on us. We move forward, regardless of any setbacks, for we as a people are strong. We continue to move forward now and loudly proclaim, “We Are Not Going Back!”
We in America today must consider and understand that we are living in a very divisive and hostile state due to our current political climate that indeed all of our “yesterdays could become our todays” with a stroke of a pen. A deep understanding of where we have come from is important as we again face these adversities, fight back and yes win. We have to, and if our stories from the past are any indication of our response to times such as these, we will.

I want to leave you with these words, words that ring as true today as they were when spoken in 1990. I never met Gloria Martin, a Revolutionary, Socialist, Feminist but through comrades have come to respect and admire her. At 74 Martin was elected organizer for Radical Women in Seattle and in an interview with the Seattle Times Martin said, “We have to fight for survival issues-better pay, benefits, abortion rights, child care. But we have to go further. We have to change the system, because as long as the system is the same, we’ll be fighting all our lives for the same thing. When people have had enough, revolution can happen suddenly.”

The first timeline was created as a part of The Connecticut Stonewall Foundation’s exhibition, Challenging and Changing America: The Struggle for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Civil Rights 1900-1999 held at the Hartford Public Library in October and November 1999. The Timeline created a conversation with the archival material on view in the exhibition. This work highlights many important events in our community in Hartford, the state of Connecticut, across America and throughout the world. Important events that helped to challenge and change ourselves, our movement and the world in which we live. The timeline is only some of the important events of our people as we have struggled and have been triumphant in our quest for equality, justice and liberation.

The timeline in booklet form was first created by Rutherford Wittus curator of the Literary and Natural History Collection at the Dodd Research Center, the University of Connecticut for the exhibition, Challenge and Change. This was a continuation of the original exhibition with additions from the holdings of the university library and curated by Mr. Wittus.

The timeline was again published for an exhibition at Central Connecticut State University by the staff of The Elihu Burritt Library under the direction of Frank Gagliardi, Associate Director of Library Services.

The current timeline is updated and additions to the original timeline are made in 2018. Information that was not available in 1998 when the timeline was first created by Richard Nelson of The Connecticut Stonewall Foundation have been added for this printing. Information that creates a conversation within and between the years in the timeline. It is the hope of the author that any and all information that becomes available will be added in future printings and that this timeline will inspire all of our people and allies to continue this important work.
Richard Nelson, Hartford Ct. 2018

Challenging and Changing America
The Struggle for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Civil Rights 1900-1999

1900: Russian born anarchist and feminist Emma Goldman takes a strong public stance in support of Oscar Wilde. When asked how she could dare to come out in support of Wilde in Puritanical America she replied, “Nonsense no daring is needed to protest great injustice!” She also speaks out in support of the rights of homosexuals. Goldman had to fight to defend her Gay liberation views against her anarchist comrades, who feared that open support of homosexuality would harm their cause.

1903: The first recorded raid on a Gay bathhouse, the Ariston Hotel Baths, is conducted in New York City. Twenty-six men were arrested and 12 brought to trial on sodomy charges: Seven men received sentences ranging from four to twelve years in prison.

1906: The first openly gay novel, with a happy ending, Imre, A Memorandum by American born author Edward Prime-Stevenson is published in Naples, Italy. The couple in the novel are happy and united when the novel ends. Critics have said, “This is the frankest and most affirming homosexual novel in the 1st decade of the century, noting that it reflects an interest in Gay history as well as the two men have a long conversation about great earlier homosexuals.”

1912: Bayard Rustin is born on March 17th. He became a leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, nonviolence and gay rights during his life time. He was a leader in the Fellowship of Reconciliation and the War Resisters League and active in the 1941 March on Washington Movement to press for an end to discrimination in employment and in 1947 he initiated a Freedom Ride to challenge with civil disobedience the racial segregation issue related to interstate busing. He was arrested in Pasadena California in 1953 for sexual activity with another man in a parked car and after that his sexuality and the criminal charges were criticized by fellow pacifists and civil rights leaders and he was attacked as a pervert by political opponents from segregationists to conservative black leaders forcing him to serve as a behind the scenes advisor to civil rights leaders and others. The Fellowship of Reconciliation fired him after his conviction and he then became the executive secretary of the War Resisters League.  Rustin became a chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In 1972 he became an honorary chairperson of the Socialist Party of America and acted as the chairperson of the Social Democrats, USA. In the 1980s he became a public advocate on behalf of gay and lesbian causes and in 1986 gave a speech on behalf of the New York State’s Gay Rights Bill. Rustin served on many humanitarian missions and at the time of his death in 1987 he was on a humanitarian mission in Haiti.

1913: Members of Heterodoxy, a feminist club in New York City for “unorthodox women” meets regularly at Polly’s, a restaurant run by anarchist Polly Holladay. It becomes a hangout for notable Lesbians and feminist women. Emma Goldman a friend of Polly’s is a frequent visitor. It is noted that the club was where women intended to “simply be ourselves, not just our little female selves, but our whole big human selves” Their purpose was self-development as contrasted with self-sacrifice or submergence in family.

1913: Emma Goldman, referred to as “Red Emma” speaks in Hartford February 12th. She talks about love and marriage and stated how marriage-maintained Capitalism. More than 500 people attended the lecture at Hartford’s Columbia Hall. She told the audience that love only comes “from a union between two people and the sanction of the church or law cannot make it a bit more scared or holy.” In talking about Marriage vs. Free Love Goldman had this to say, “Free Love? As if love is anything but free it can live in no other atmosphere. In freedom it gives itself unreservedly, abundantly, completely.” Marriage on the other hand, “incapacitates (a woman) for life’s struggles, annihilates her social consciousness, paralyzes her imagination.”

1916: A moral reform organization known as the Committee of Fourteen Periodically investigates the Drag Balls being held in Harlem. The committee released 130 reports describing its visits and demanding that such “perversion must desist.” During this period and throughout the 1920s the police, politicians and mainstream society found themselves simply unable to suspend the ball scenes. The patrons rather than abandoning the scene fought for change and opportunity.

1917: The Bolshevik revolution sweeps away centuries-old standards of sexual conduct. Two months after coming to power the Bolsheviks struck down all laws governing sexual conduct. This early Soviet policy stated, “Absolute non-inference into sexual matters.” Revolutionary delegates play a leading role in the World Congress of Sexual Reform, an organization committed to Gay rights organized by Magnus Hirschfield.

1919: The Institute for Sexual Research is opened in Berlin and is run by Gay rights campaigner Magnus Hirschfeld. The word Transsexual was coined here, and people could receive counseling services. Dr. Hirschfeld was consulted on the first modern day sexual reassignment surgery that of Lili Elbe. Connected to the Institute was the Scientific Humanitarian Committee a group of Scientists and LGBT people who promoted LGBT civil rights. This group along with others in Germany sought to repeal Paragraph 175.

1919: Different from The Others, one of the first explicitly Gay films is released. Magnus Hirschfeld has a cameo role in the film and partially funded its production. The film was a polemic against the current laws under Germany’s Paragraph 175. A short time after its premier conservative religious and right-wing groups begin to disrupt public showings of the film. In 1920 legislators approved specific censorship provisions and banned public screenings of the film. The law stated that the film showed bias against Paragraph 175, confused young adults, and could be used as a recruitment of young people. When the Nazis came to power the film was one of many so called “decadent” works and was burned. Only one early copy of the original film exists but other copies have been made and shown at LGBT Film Festivals.

1919: Emma Goldman is deported to Russia under the direction of J. Edgar Hoover who labeled her “one of the most dangerous women in America.”

1920: Drag Balls which began in 1869 at Hamilton Lodge, Harlem began to gain more public visibility and were frequented by many Gay men and Lesbian women as well as straight people. These balls help to pave the way for an establishment of a queer culture.

1923: Emma Goldman writes a major article for the German Yearbook for Sexual Intermediate Types defending gay rights and discussing Oscar Wilde and French anarchist and poet Louise Michel alleged to be a Lesbian. While excoriating society for its persecution of Gays, Goldman also denounced the sexism of those who assumed a woman to be a Lesbian simply because she did not fit men’s “shopworn requirements of womanhood.”

1923: On a Grey Thread is written by Elsa Gidlow, freelance journalist, poet and philosopher. The book is considered to be the first volume of openly Lesbian love poetry published in North America. In the 1950s Gidlow helps to found Druid Heights a bohemian community in Marin Country California and popular meeting place for three countercultural movement, the Beats, the Hippies and the Women’s movement. Due to her membership in political and writers’ groups allegedly affiliated with communists she was investigated, subpoenaed and forced to testify at the House Un-American Activities Committee. Being an Anarchist, she denied that she was a communist. In 1977 Gidlow appeared in Word is Out: Stories of Some of Our Lives where she openly discusses her life as a Lesbian. Gidlow’s autobiography, Elsa, I come with My Songs: The Autobiography of Elsa Gidlow, is published in 1986 and she gives a detailed account of seeking, finding and creating a life with other Lesbians. This book is published right before her death in 1986.

1924: The Society for Human Rights is founded in Chicago by Henry Gerber. The Society received a charter from the state of Illinois and produced the first publication for homosexuals, Friendship and Freedom. The society had originally seven members but had difficulty in interesting anyone other than poorer gays and was unable to gain any financial support from the more affluent members of Chicago’s Gay community. A few months after receiving its charter the Society ceased to exist in the wake of the arrests of several of its members. (more…)

Who killed Marielle and Anderson?
COMMITTEE FOR REVOLUTIONARY INTERNATIONAL REGROUPMENT (CRIR)

Brazil and the world have been shocked by the assassination of the Rio de Janeiro city councilwoman, Marielle Franco, of the PSOL (Party of Socialism and Freedom) and her driver Anderson Gomes on March 15, 2018. Millions have taken to the streets in Rio and in other cities throughout Brazil to denounce this crime and call for justice. Marielle was assassinated after she left a meeting called to advocate for the rights of Black women–one of the most oppressed, discriminated against and exploited sectors under capitalism in Brazil, where a Black is killed every 23 minutes. Today in Rio de Janeiro, millions of Blacks, workers, students and housewives live in terrible conditions of extreme poverty in favelas (poor neighborhoods) under the threat of violent state repression, drug traffickers, arms dealers and criminals. Marielle was a young, Black lesbian and socialist activist for the rights of women, Blacks, inhabitants of the favelas and the LGBT community. She devoted her life to systematically speaking out against police and paramilitary repression and focused on describing how state violence attains levels of ethnic and social cleansing.

President Michel Temer has declared that “This crime against an elected city council woman will not go unpunished.” The spokespersons of the governing parties and the establishment media have declared that the assassination of Marielle is the product of “organized crime.” However, Marielle was murdered when fourteen 9-mm-caliber bullets were fired into her car. It has come to light that the same type of bullets is used by the Federal Police (FP), and the latest investigations indicate that the bullets belong to a lot of ammunition acquired by the police in December 2006.

The murder of Marielle and Anderson comes less than a month after President Temer, with the support of Congress, decreed the Brazilian military occupation of the whole state of Rio de Janeiro, especially of the favelas of its namesake capital. This was an unprecedented measure, the first since the adoption of the current Constitution in 1988. This measure constitutes an open attack on the democratic freedoms of the Brazilian people. Brazil’s Armed Forces were deployed to take control of the favelas, allegedly “to end the drug trafficking and bring security to the citizens of Rio de Janeiro.” Army General Walter Braga Netto was appointed by President Temer with the power to direct the Military Police, the Civil Police, the Fire Department and the State Penitentiaries in Rio de Janeiro, all institutions implicated to varying degrees in the drug trafficking and violence that plagues Rio. Netto is accountable only to President Temer.

The death of Marielle and Anderson just 25 days after this military intervention illustrates the consequences of President Temer’s policy of state repression. In the words of the favela resident and mother of Vitor Santiago Borges, a young man who was shot in the spine and left quadriplegic: “Human rights violations will only occur within the favelas. The tanks will not circulate through the expensive Southern Zone beach neighborhoods (where Ipanema is located), because this military operation is just an excuse to kill poor Blacks and favelados.”The assassination of Marielle and death of Anderson has awakened a giant, the Brazilian mass movement, which has responded with a unanimous denunciation of this execution and murder in huge mobilizations throughout Brazil. (more…)