Archive for the ‘art’ Category

We are a member of the Queer Artist group on facebook and have come to love certain artists in the group and always look forward to their new postings and comments. J. Bruce Wilcox is an artist that we love and admire. Not only for his art but for his social commentaries. Wilcox says about himself “I refer to myself as a fiber or textile artist. I am not a quilter. I do not make quilts. I do not think like a quilter. My reasons for creating and my intended end-use of that creation are different than most quilters. And I don’t give a fuck about the tradition of quiltmaking. I just call it art.” Indeed and we do too. We are showing some examples of his art, work that inspires us, moves us and gets us thinking. We hope our readers from all over the world will find as much enjoyment in his work as we do.

J. Bruce Wilcox has given this blog permission to publish this exhibition and we thank him.

“I am an artist making art not a quilter making quilts!”

J. Bruce Wilcox (this work is unfinished)

“As an out gay male working in a predominately female medium- over time I’ve had to deal with all the stereotypes involved. I learned to sew when I was 8. I’ve been working with/in fiber my whole life. I made my first art quilt in 1977 and won a Best-In-Show award on it. I was 24 and nobody knew what an art quilt was.”

Below is one of our favorite art works, Masquerade. Bruce says about work such as this: “I’m an abstract artist- having little interest in representational art. My history/roots are artists who moved away from representation into pure abstraction- including geometric and math influenced artists- as well as pop/op artists. My work continues to be about vibration- but also texture. And although it’s mostly me who is confrontational- the work is inherently challenging because it simply no longer has anything to do with the tradition of quiltmaking.”

Masquerade.

Masquerade like many of J. Bruce Wilcox’s work captured my interest for their movement, and their vibration adding that whole other dimension to the art works. This work moves us into the great tradition of the Op Artists who I believe have to be some of the most interesting artists creating some of the more interesting art works of the 20th century. Think about it, a flat canvas, an art work that moves, it no longer stays still hanging up there on the wall. It is here and there, vibrating, flashing, swelling, wrapping, moving in and out, disappearing and reappearing. When I was in high school my art teacher was involved with the Op Art Movement. Myself and a few other budding young artists were invited to the opening of the Responsive Eye at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1965. How thrilled she was to have her work hanging in the same room as Josef Albers. The connection, she was one of the people who brought Albers and his wife Annie to this country. Masquerade by J. Bruce Wilcox could have hung brilliantly among the other works in the exhibition. Next up is the eye popping unfinished work that would cause Bridget Riley to applaud.

Existential Foundation

This work above is unfinished but we find it to be extraordinary. It captures the spirit of abstract art and brings it beyond. Truly on the way to becoming a masterpiece. (more…)

Trans Lifeline Benefit at Chez Est

Hosted by Mia E Z’Lay and Chez Est

Sunday November 25, 2018 4pm to 11pm

458 Wethersfield Ave. Hartford Ct.

There will be no entry fee! We will have a show every hour starting at 5pm. We have so many amazing entertainers who are donating their time and art. All money made from the shows will be donated to Trans Lifeline.
Mia E Z’Lay and Layne Alexander Gianakos will be running the event at Chez Est

If you are interested in donating and can not make it please message Mia or Layne. If you want to perform message us asap!

Please share with your friends and family!

Facebook Page HERE. 

We visited Open Studio Hartford for a short time on Saturday November 10. We present two artists whose work we viewed and hope to view again perhaps in a one person exhibition around town.

Robert Zott
We first became acquainted with the artist Robert Zott many years ago, don’t remember how we did or when it was but visited him when he was first living in Art Space Hartford. There was a showing in one of the art spaces of his photographs of tombstones and I got a chance to go to his studio and meet him and see more work by this artist. His work is not only funny but it is amazing to see the surnames of people, common everyday words that one would not expect to be a persons last name or that is a common last name but in this arrangement becomes no longer common but a work of art.

The Death of Color

6 B&W Photos, Edition of 3, 10X8 Gelatin Silver Prints, 29.5X36 overall.

What a way to start this article. Color has died and is buried, but immortalized on a tombstone. What a strange concept. Color has died.

Most of us visiting a cemetery would probably just pass by a tombstone unless the stone was an extraordinary work of art. If noticed on our visit the names Carpenter, Mechanic, Barber, Postman (now that would be one that I would stop and wonder about) Baker and Doctor we more than likely would just pass by, go about our business, mourn our dead and leave a plant or bouquet of flowers. But here in this arrangement the names and the stones take on a whole new meaning. Arranged together by the artist this work removes the stones from their individual stand and together become something new. “There Goes The Neighborhood” conjures up to us that the workers are invading some posh little place, invading with their aches and pains, their callous and bruises, their greasy hands, smelling like baked bread and hopefully Mr. or Ms. Postman has washed their hands after delivering all that mail. In “There goes the Neighborhood,” they rest together, in all their working class glory, regardless of what the upper classes may say, want or desire.

“There Goes The Neighborhood”

6 B&W Photos, Edition of 3, 10X8 Gelatin Silver Prints, 29.5X36 overall.

Artists such as Robert Zott take which is available arrange it as only an artist can and present to us something we have never seen or most likely never thought of. By the hand of the artist our dearly departed become together with others, art. This working of Zott’s can not be an easy process, finding a cemetery, walking around finding a tombstone. He walks the cemetery searching for stones with just the last name. No first names, no birth date or death date, no epitaph. What a joy it must be to find a stone with a name, a name that can become more than just another name. A name and a stone that fits into the parameters that the artist has set for his work. Some of us are old enough to remember the Dick, Jane, Sally and Spot books that we learned to read from. You know the old, Run Dick Run, See Dick Run, See Sally laugh, Laugh Sally laugh or something like that. In the hands, mind and eye of the artist this series takes on a whole new meaning. A meaning that is closely associated with the death of Dick by drowning and the idea unless he is cremated he will end up under a stone. Just another name, another stone in another cemetery somewhere for an artist to find someday. Bon Voyage a French phrase  usually translated in English to “goodbye”, “have a nice trip,” “safe journey,” Yes, Bon Voyage Dick where ever you end up or down in the case of drowning or being buried in your grave.

Bon Voyage

12 B&W photos, edition of 3,
16 x 20″ gelatin silver prints, 97 x 84″ overall.

Zott reminds us of the endless possibilities all around in our world for the making of art. But yes it takes an artist to draw out these possibilities, to show us what is indeed possible and in doing so presents us with a new way of seeing the world. It takes an artist as John’s said, to “take something, do something with it, do something else.” As a child I use to go to a cemetery in my hometown. There was a tombstone, a cube standing on one corner with the name Day. That’s all just Day. I remember how all of us kids admired that stone. I wondered this morning where Purple was buried in this hometown cemetery. (more…)

Bread and Puppet Theater in New York City Dec 5th to Dec 16th!
Public · Hosted by Bread and Puppet Theater and Theater for the New City

Bread and Puppet Theater returns to Theater for the New City for it’s annual December residency!

Theater for the New City
155 1st Ave, New York, New York 10003
Show Map

Tickets · On Sale November 1 at 12 PM
theaterforthenewcity.net

Dec 5th- Dec 9th: The Or Else Opera – Eisler/Brecht

A paper maché puppet opera, punctuated by melting ice drops under a starry sky made of garlic. The composer Hanns Eisler, a major Brecht collaborator, fled the Nazis, joined the Berliner Ensemble and now enters the 21st century’s humanity, it’s giant fears and overcrowded spirit, at the moment of re-occurring fascism. In musical collaboration with The Pi Ensemble.

Dec 13th- Dec 16th: The Grasshopper Rebellion Circus

The Grasshopper Rebellion Circus is a large-scale puppet spectacle that explains and teaches riot and rebellion against intolerable situations with the help of state of the art paper-maché weaponry and the appropriate riotous Bread and Puppet Brass Band.

B&P director, Peter Schumann, says of The Grasshopper Rebellion Circus: “Tigers roar, apes drum their chests, horses neigh, and celestial grasshoppers teach ICE agents the basics steps of grasshopper rebellion dancing. A paradise investigation team analyses the earthling’s relationship to paradise, while major representatives of Mother Earth attend a festive Puerto Rican dance of liberation from natural and political disaster.”

*Bread and aioli to be served following all shows! & The Cheap Art Emporium will be open for your perusal.

tickets available at http://theaterforthenewcity.net

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! Please contact joe.yes.yes@gmail.com for more info if you are interested in volunteering. For more information go to HERE.

Not to be missed. Catch a train, get a bus, down to La MaMa for this important festival. You want to see puppets, real deal puppets? Check out this festival to see what some of the best puppets ae doing these days.


From LaMaMa

Series Curator: Denise Greber
The La MaMa Puppet Festival showcases new contemporary puppet theatre by artists from around the world. Curated by Denise Greber, this year’s series focuses on diversifying the voices, stories, and perspectives shared onstage, with the goal of uplifting marginalized identities within the puppet community. The festival highlights interdisciplinary works from female artists who explore issues such as cultural identity, Black Lives Matter, the refugee crisis, and the disability experience. Programming also includes family events, the annual Puppet Slam, La MaMa Coffeehouse Chronicles, and Jump Start: a weekend of works in progress.

Puppet theatre has been an integral part of La MaMa’s programming since 1962, when Ellen Stewart invited puppet artists from Korean to perform their production of Head Hunting by Pagoon Kang Wouk. Through the Puppet Festival, La MaMa continues to support both emerging and established artists whose innovative work enriches the field of puppetry. The festival is under the leadership of Denise Greber (Director and Curator) and Federico Restrepo (Producing Director).

The 8th La MaMa Puppet Festival Fall 2018 has been made possible with support from Ford Foundation, Howard Gilman Foundation, The Jim Henson Foundation, Puppet Slam Network, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, The Harold and Mimi Steinberg Charitable Trust and public support by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Cultural on the Arts. Additional support from Cheryl Henson is gratefully acknowledged.

For more information and to buy tickets see:  http://lamama.org/programs/puppet-festival/

INTRODUCTION:

Anyone who reads this blog knows that we have published articles on earthworms off and on. We just love them what can we say. We celebrate the earthworm as our friend, a friend that should be cared for and a friend that we should keep off of fisherman’s hooks and never spray the ground they live in with insecticides which is one of the biggest dangers to the earthworm.  Want to care for the earth then start with the lowly earthworm which does so much for the planets health. We have been busy working on this collage of found interesting facts, pictures, and videos for your viewing pleasure.

Since it is spring time even though it is damn chilly outside we thought, Hey why don’t we republish that wonderful collage about earthworms for anyone who is getting into that gardening spirit.  Since we all agreed to go into our archives and find this work we will publish it for your viewing pleasure.

Information on The Earthworm. 

“It may be doubted whether there are any other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world as have these lowly, organized creatures, ” Charles Darwin. (1)

When it is stated that in this vast array of creatures the lowly, segmented earthworm is probably the most important to mankind, the uninitiated might aptly declare that such a statement sounds neither logical nor reasonable.  That little slimy thing, that small creepy thing, good only for fishing bait, and to chop in half and see if they grow themselves back together again. (they don’t). Yet few creatures equal the burrowing earthworm as an essential to better health and greater growth to plant and vegetable life, and, therefore, indirectly is of the utmost importance to man. Now we all need our plants and vegetables, this is true and we need these things without a chemical side dish to worry about. So get up, boys and girls give a salute to the worm, say thank you, thank you. From the small and slimy we get great things.

Earthworms doing their job in the vegetable patch.

Earthworms in the garden

The burrowing earthworm is Nature’s own plough, her chemist, her cultivator, her fertilizer, her distributor of plant food. In every way, the earthworm surpasses anything man has yet invented to plough, to cultivate or to fertilize the soil.

Red Worms the best for the job.

Red worms are nature’s waste-renewal units.  They don’t simply consume the waste, they turn it into something far more useful: nutrient-rich compost.  Red worms cut the composting process down to a third of the time it would take without the presence of worms and eliminate the need to turn your compost! (one less thing to do around the farm, take a break at that time.) Got a compost bin get some worms, stick them in, feed them, water them and all the plants you grow will say thanks farmer Abbey.

Can we say it? Yes we can. You know us yes we will.

(4)

There is nothing short of a revolution here. Has been for a billion years. Earthworms survived the great calamity that killed off the dinosaurs and been ploughing the earth ever since. We’ve been ploughing the earth for a billion years and we plough the earth still. This unpaid handy worker goes about its business creating a revolution in farming, a revolution in the way we produce our food, a revolution in our health, and a revolution in the way we treat our waste. The worms are like the masses, working together the worm has power, individually they are powerless, but together now they are capable of breaking down and transforming all kind of biodegradables, including perhaps the rot that permeates our society. Take a tip from the earth worm, oh you artists you. Take a tip from the lowly worm. Join the revolution.

What are those tiny little mounds almost like a sandcastle we see on the ground?

These here? Earthworm castings on the dirt.

Earthworm Castings are the excretions left behind by worms after they finish digesting the organic matter that makes up their diet. The process of creating worm castings is probably the most efficient means of recycling kitchen and yard wastes.

Benefits of Worm Castings in the Garden

More than just a great plant fertilizer, castings are also a terrific soil amendment, plant growth enhancer, and the gardener’s ultimate compost. Earthworm castings are clean, odorless, and can be used indoors and outdoors to provide a boost to all of your plants.  Indoors, castings can be added to potting soil or mixed into the containers of established houseplants. (5) Outdoors in the garden spread worm castings and incorporate them into the surface soil levels of your raised beds. Castings can also be added to the bottom of the planting hole when setting out transplants, or scratched into the soil surrounding established flowers and vegetables. Worm castings are loaded with beneficial soil microbes and other soil organisms that will help restore life and health to depleted and worn out garden soils. (more…)

Frosty O’ Flaherty

Posted: March 13, 2018 in *Celebration*, art, Fun

Today was a snow day (paid for not working) so we went out to play. We built a snow creature name Frosty O’ Flaherty in Pope Park. Frosty will reside there until some kiddies knock him down or someone steals his outfit.