Archive for the ‘Call to Action’ Category

NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut added a new video.
Listen to the Executive Director, Sarah Croucher, explain what crisis pregnancy centers are and more about our work in Hartford. To learn more visit exposecpcsct.org, and to take action in Hartford contact erica@prochoicect.org

“I believe that any person seeking reproductive health care should be able to do so without confusion, deception, or shame.”

An anti-choice group, St. Gerard’s Center for Life, recently moved into the same courtyard as Hartford GYN Center on the corner of Jefferson and Main Street in the South End of Hartford. Upon moving, St. Gerard’s Center for Life has renamed as “Hartford Women’s Center” and assigns staff and volunteers to actively confuse and intercept patients as they walk to appointments.
“Hartford Women’s Center” is one of about 30 crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) in Connecticut. The mission of crisis pregnancy centers is to pressure people facing unplanned pregnancies to carry their pregnancies to term, no matter what. These anti-choice centers are unlicensed and unregulated by the state, and often use deceptive advertising and signage (i.e. “Pregnant? Scared? Need help?), delay tactics, shame, and medically inaccurate information about abortion and contraception to pressure people about their health care decisions. The deceptive practices of CPCs are a disruption in the community and a direct threat to time sensitive reproductive health care.

To sign the petition go to HERE.

Find out from NARAL what you can do. There will be hearings on the proposed ordinance coming up. If you are in the Hartford area plan to go to them if you can. If not sign the petition and support NARAL and groups in your area who fully support women and reproductive freedom. We at furbirdsqueerly know full well that the right when attacking women’s rights are also attacking us in the LGBTQ community. The same folks who are out protesting the GYN Center on Saturday have a long history of also protesting the LGBTQ community.

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We Will Rise!

Posted: November 15, 2017 in Call to Action, for your reflection

Concept by Milo Milo artwork by Gammy Alvarez.

The inscription on the machete reads “”Nosotros queremos la libertad, nuestros machetes nos la darán”

 

Original 1868 revolutionary of La Borinqueña version by Lola Rodríguez de Tió

¡Despierta, borinqueño
que han dado la señal!
¡Despierta de ese sueño
que es hora de luchar!
A ese llamar patriótico
¿no arde tu corazón?
¡Ven! Nos será simpático
el ruido del cañón.
Mira, ya el cubano
libre será;
le dará el machete
su libertad…
le dará el machete
su libertad.
Ya el tambor guerrero
dice en su son,
que es la manigua el sitio,
el sitio de la reunión,
de la reunión…
de la reunión.
El Grito de Lares
se ha de repetir,
y entonces sabremos
vencer o morir.
Bellísima Borinquén,
a Cuba hay que seguir;
tú tienes bravos hijos
que quieren combatir.
ya por más tiempo impávido
no podemos estar,
ya no queremos, tímidos
dejarnos subyugar.
Nosotros queremos
ser libre ya,
y nuestro machete
afilado está.
y nuestro machete
afilado está.
¿Por qué, entonces, nosotros
hemos de estar,
tan dormidos y sordos
y sordos a esa señal?
a esa señal, a esa señal?
No hay que temer, riqueños
al ruido del cañón,
que salvar a la patria
es deber del corazón!
ya no queremos déspotas,
caiga el tirano ya,
las mujeres indómitas
también sabrán luchar.
Nosotros queremos
la libertad,
y nuestros machetes
nos la darán…
y nuestro machete
nos la dará…
Vámonos, borinqueños,
vámonos ya,
que nos espera ansiosa,
ansiosa la libertad.
¡La libertad, la libertad!
Arise, boricua!
The call to arms has sounded!
Awake from the slumber,
it is time to fight!
Doesn’t this patriotic
call set your heart alight?
Come! We are in tune with
the roar of the cannon.
Come, Come, the Cuban will
soon be freed;
the machete will give him
his justice,
the machete will give him
his liberty.
Now the drums of war
speak with their music,
that the jungle is the place,
the meeting place.
The meeting…
The meeting…
The Cry of Lares
must be repeated,
and then we will know:
victory or death.
Beautiful Borinquén
must follow Cuba;
you have brave sons
who wish to fight.
Now, no longer can
we be unmoved;
now we do not want timidly
to let them subjugate us.
We want to be free now,
and our machete
has been sharpened.
We want to be free now,
and our machete
has been sharpened.
Why, then,
have we been
so sleepy and deaf
to the call?
To the call, to the call?
There is no need to fear,
Ricans, the roar of the cannon;
saving the nation is
the duty of the heart.
We no longer want despots,
tyranny shall fall now;
the unconquerable women also will
know how to fight.
We want freedom,
and our machetes
will give it to us.
We want freedom,
and our machetes
will give it to us.
Come, Boricuas,
come now,
since freedom
awaits us anxiously,
freedom, freedom!

After the cession of the island to the United States, the popular revolutionary lyrics of Lola Rodríguez de Tió were deemed too subversive for official adoption; therefore, a non-confrontational set of lyrics were written in 1903 by Asturias-born Manuel Fernández Juncos. The tune was officially adopted as the Commonwealth’s anthem in 1952 by governor Luis Muñoz Marín, and the words were officially adopted in 1977 by governor Carlos Romero Barceló. Perhaps people will begin to sing this version after experiencing  the US response to the devastation of the island. At the least this version will be sung as capitalist corporations and the wealthy begin to make Puerto Rico their very own playground.  ( 1)

Notes:

(1) Vulture Capitalists Circle Above Puerto Rican Prey. 

Exploiting tragedy heartless Republicans seek to privatize Puerto Rico after Hurrican Maria.

In the aftermath of Katrina real estate mogul Joseph Canizaro said the clearing out caused by Katrina represented some “very big opportunities.” A Republican representative from Baton Rouge said, “We finally cleaned up public housing in New Orleans. We couldn’t do it, but God did.”  For more on how the rich benefit from natural disasters go to HERE.

Or consider your local LGBTQ groups.

2017 has already seen at least 25 transgender people fatally shot or killed by other violent means in the USA. TRANSRESPECT has complied a list from around the world. 325 reported murders of trans and gender-diverse people between 1 October 2016 and 30 September 2017 . To see the list go to HERE.

We will continue to work toward justice and equality for transgender people, we mourn those we have lost:

Mesha Caldwell, 41, a black transgender woman from Canton, Mississippi, was found shot to death the evening of January 4. The murder is still under investigation and no suspects have been arrested.
Sean Hake, 23, a transgender man in Sharon, Pennsylvania, died after he was shot by police responding to a 911 call from his mother. A friend told WKBN that Sean “had a genuinely good heart and he had struggled with his problems.”
Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, 28, an American Indian woman who identified as transgender and two-spirit, was found dead in her apartment in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. A suspect, 25-year-old Joshua Rayvon LeClaire, has been arrested and charged with murder and manslaughter in connection with her death.
JoJo Striker, 23, a transgender woman, was found killed in Toledo, Ohio, on February 8. Striker’s mother, Shanda Striker, described her as “funny and entertaining” and said her family loved her deeply.
Tiara Richmond, also known as Keke Collier, 24, was fatally shot in Chicago on the morning of February 21. A transgender woman of color, she was found dead on the same street as two other transgender women that were killed in 2012.
Chyna Doll Dupree, 31, a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed in New Orleans on February 25. Chyna was a much-loved performer in the ballroom community who was visiting friends and family in New Orleans at the time of her death.
Ciara McElveen, 26, a transgender woman of color, was stabbed to death in New Orleans on February 27. McElveen did outreach for the homeless community. As of February 28, 2017, HRC has tracked at least nine murders of transgender people in Louisiana since 2013.
Jaquarrius Holland, 18, was shot to death in Monroe, Louisiana, on February 19. One friend, Chesna Littleberry, told Mic that Holland was “like a younger sister” and had helped her learn to accept herself.
Alphonza Watson, 38, was shot and killed in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 22. Watson’s mother said her daughter was “the sunshine of our family,” a “caring, passionate” person who loved cooking and gardening.
Chay Reed, 28, a transgender woman of color, was shot and killed on April 21 in Miami. Reed’s longtime friend told Mic about their longtime friendship — describing her as someone who was full of life and beloved by many.
Kenneth Bostick, 59, was found with severe injuries on a Manhattan sidewalk, he later died of his injuries. Few details about Bostick’s life have been reported, he is believed to have been homeless at the time he was attacked.*
Sherrell Faulkner, 46, a transgender woman of color died on May 16, of injuries sustained during an attack on November 30, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Police are treating the assault as a homicide. No arrests have been made at this point.
Kenne McFadden, 27, was found in the San Antonio River on April 9. Police believe she was pushed into the river, which runs through downtown San Antonio. A high-school friend of McFadden described her to local media as assertive, charismatic and lovable. No arrests have been made, but police said they have a person of interest in custody.
Kendra Marie Adams, 28, was found in a building that was under construction and had burns on her body on June 13. Police have charged Michael Davis, 45, with Adams’ murder. Adams also went by Josie Berrios, the name used in initial media reports on her death.
Ava Le’Ray Barrin, 17, was shot and killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25 during an altercation in an apartment parking lot. In an online obituary, friends remembered Barrin as a “social butterfly” and an “amazing girl” who “loved to make people laugh.”
Ebony Morgan, 28, was shot multiple times in Lynchburg, Virginia, in the early morning of July 2. Morgan was transferred to a local hospital where she succumbed to her injuries. Authorities have named Kenneth Allen Kelly Jr. as a person of interest in the case.
TeeTee Dangerfield, 32, a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed on July 31 in Atlanta, Georgia. According to the Georgia Voice, Dangerfield “was found with multiple gunshot wounds outside of her vehicle at the South Hampton Estates apartment complex.”
Gwynevere River Song, 26, was shot and killed in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 12. According to their Facebook profile, they identified as “femandrogyne” and a member of the bisexual community.
Kiwi Herring, 30, was killed during an altercation with police on August 22 during an altercation with her neighbor. Relatives told Huffpost the neighbor was transphobic and that excessive force by police led to her death.
Kashmire Nazier Redd, 28, was fatally stabbed by his partner on September 5. A friend wrote on Facebook “[Kashmire] loved hard and just wanted to be loved and [accepted].”
Derricka Banner, 26, was found shot to death in Charlotte, North Carolina on September 12. Friends describe Banner as a “playful spirit” and “go-getter” who enjoyed life.
Scout Schultz, 21, was shot and killed by Georgia Tech campus police on September 16. The GT Progressive Student Alliance, a progressive student advocacy group on campus, called Schultz an “incredible, inspirational member of our community and a constant fighter for human rights.”
Ally Steinfeld, 17, was stabbed to death in Missouri in early September. Three people have been charged in her murder. Steinfeld’s family said Ally “sometimes” identified as female on social media.
Stephanie Montez, 47, was brutally murdered near Robstown, Texas. Montez’s longtime friend, Brittany Ramirez, described her as “one of the sweetest people you’ll ever meet.”
Candace Towns, 30, a transgender woman who was found shot to death in Georgia. Town’s friend, Malaysa Monroe, remembers Towns’ generosity. “If I needed anything she would give it to me. She would give me the clothes off her back,” Monroe said.

Friday, 2017-11-10, 7:00 pm
ESG Bonn Königsstrasse 88
Nuclear in India: Construction and Resistance Presentation and Discussion with Kumar Sundaram (DiaNuke.org, India)
Not in the Name of Climate, Not in Our Name!: India’s Poor Resist Nuclear Power
India is one of the very few countries that are expanding atomic power in the post-Fukushima world, providing a lucrative market for the global nuclear lobbies. In doing so, the government is overlooking safety and environmental norms and also brutally repressing grassroots protests. All this is being justified in the name of providing electricity to the poor and responding to climate change. What is the truth? (Speaker: Kumar Sundaram, DiaNuke.org, INDIA)
#iwweuc
(VW)

For your information.

“I believe that any person seeking reproductive health care should be able to do so without confusion, deception, or shame.”

What are Crisis Pregnancy Centers?

Crisis pregnancy centers are fake clinics– they are fronts for anti-abortion organizations set up to steer people away from choosing safe and legal abortion.
CPCs do not provide or refer for abortion care, emergency contraception, or birth control, but often try to present themselves as comprehensive reproductive healthcare clinics in order to lure people inside. Once inside, people are often lied to, shamed, and pressured about their reproductive healthcare decisions.
Crisis pregnancy centers are an imminent threat to people seeking reproductive healthcare in Connecticut. Currently, there are about 30 CPCs and only 18 licensed family planning clinics in Connecticut. This website will help you spot the signs of a CPC and direct you to where you can get real (licensed clinic) reproductive healthcare.
At NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut, we believe that people should never be pressured, lied to, or shamed about their healthcare decisions.

For more information go to HERE.  Sign the petition. Spread the word.