Archive for the ‘*Celebration*’ Category

3 Black and Brown Women who fought back at Stonewall! We remember them with PRIDE and honor them always.

Sylvia Rivera Trans Movement Founder. We celebrate our sister Sylvia Rivera on PRIDE week and every week.

Marsha P. Johnson. Marsha we will always love you forever.

Sylvia and Marsha P. Johnson our fore-mothers in revolution.

Storme’ DeLarverie: The cop hit me so I hit him back!!

During the ’50s and ’60s, Stormé DeLarverie toured the black theatre circuit as a mistress of ceremonies and sole impersonator of the legendary Jewel Box Revue. DeLarverie was one of many that fought the police in the 1969 historic riot at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village. Filmmaker Michelle Parkerson finds DeLarverie and looks back on the grandeur of the Jewel Box Revue.

and here is Storme’ in her own words:

Three women who stood up and said NO! Who fought back! The LGBTQ communities owe a great deal to these 3 revolutionaries.

 (1)

Here is a leaflet and sign posting we did a few years back. These leaflets were posted around downtown Hartford and passed out in the streets. We said why not post it again 17 years later.

Notes:

(1)  From the Black Orchid Collective is Queer Liberation and Class Struggle. JOMO says about this flag, “my friend, Sarah Hopkins, made this flag after we watched “Flag Wars,” a film about middle class, white gay men gentrifying a black neighborhood. The rainbow flag became a symbol of gentrification, so we realized we need to make our own flag which symbolizes working class, queer liberation.”

(2) Photo outside of the Stonewall Inn, June 1969. Fred Mc Darrah NYC.

We heard this song many years ago and thought of it today after reading a statement on PRIDE written by Lady Bunny.

Lady Bunny schools us, well.

“Let’s cancel gay pride! Instead, let’s just fight over the f#cking flag this year! Let’s fight over the correct terms for everybody. Let’s dismiss everyone who doesn’t want to transition as a privileged cisgender. Let’s spar over the name of our own damn community–is it gay, LGBT, LGBTQ, LGBTQIA or did we bring back two spirits yet? I also saw a Y in there recently and have no idea what that even is. Let’s admit right now that we hate each other as a community, and that we’re too ungrateful to celebrate the freedoms which we do have once a year. Let’s compartmentalize ourselves into bears, twinks, butches, femmes, trans, tops, bottoms and those who claim they have no gender to further divide an already small community which does not have rights to equal housing and employment. And we’re even barred from using the bathrooms of their choice in some states! That’s a surefire way to make sure we’ll never get equal rights. Let’s boil it down to the tiniest arguments which will mean nothing in six months or even six days. If we took the energy and vitriol we reserved to pounce on one flag variation in one city and turned it on those who seek to destroy our rights, we’d be running the world tomorrow and we’d all have gorgeous new hairstyles to boot.
And in our supreme jadedness of which I am also guilty, let’s try and remember that there are young members of our own tribe who have gotten nothing but soul-destroying messages from their schoolmates, their churches and even from their families. Do they need our help? They need to see large groups of their own tribe in a festive environment so that they don’t feel so alone. They need to see happy and proud gay, lesbian, transsexual and every color of the rainbow folk actually liking and supporting each other. Or would youth even want to join this community if they saw the way we’ve been acting lately?”

This wonderful posting is from the Party for Socialism and Liberation. Both are what we need.

“We oppose all forms of bigotry and discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender.
This position derives not only from the study of Marxism but also accumulated experience over decades in the struggles of the LGBTQ community. From the Stonewall era to the present, PSL members and leaders have been on the front lines in struggles against anti-LGBTQ violence, in confronting right-wing bigots and reactionary laws, during the sharp confrontations of the AIDS epidemic, in early battles for trans rights and inclusion, and in the movement for marriage equality, among others. Within this movement, PSL members have always projected anti-racist and anti-imperialist politics: working class unity.”..Party for Socialism and Liberation, Boston Mass.
http://liberationschool.org/resolution-of-the-party-for-so…/

Just two of the wonderful signs that will be in the Pride march Boston on Saturday. Many thanks to the WWP and Stonewall Warriors for these signs. For more information and contact for the contingent that will march go to Andie Michelle ‎Stonewall Warriors QTPOC Liberation Anti-capitalist Contingent post. 

The contingent has this to say and we support and agree 100%:

1) We stand against exclusion or radical POC voices: We will not ride at the back of this bus—Stop silencing of political voices!
2) Black Trans Lives Matter—Speak out & ACT-UP against transmisogynist violence!
3) We are anti-capitalist & anti-“corporate pride”: Get Big $$$ OUT of Pride—No blood money from prison & pipeline profiteers!
4) We stand against racist police brutality and white-supremacist, Islamophobic, anti-immigrant terrorism; our demand is “Refuse to accept Police & ICE terror!” & Sin Justicia NO HAY ORGULLO! (without justice there is no Pride).

Image may contain: 1 person, text

Image may contain: 1 person, text

This collection contains essays on LGBT Liberation.

1.We Take No Pride Leaflet passed out a Pride in 2002.

2. Political Pride Federal Building, 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Queers Without Borders Pride Leaflet, not dated.

4. No Drag Queens at Stonewall you say? We say take a flying fuck.

5. Two very important essays containing information on the history of our movement here in Ct. Found HERE.

6. Holy Matrimony Batman, essay by Jeri Marie Liesegang.

7. Somewhere along the way the movement for liberation  was hijacked and these, marriage and the right to serve in the military became the cause of the moment. Yes, we know straights will like you better if you’re just like them and please don’t forget the only difference is what you do in bed.  10 Essays on Marriage and the Military.

New York City. 1970

Image result for huey newton speech on gay rights

On August 15, 1970, Newton delivered a speech in New York, titled “A Letter to the Revolutionary Brothers and Sisters About The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements.”

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion.

I say ”whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with.

We must gain security in ourselves and therefore have respect and feelings for all oppressed people. We must not use the racist attitude that the white racists use against our people because they are Black and poor. Many times the poorest white person is the most racist because he is afraid that he might lose something, or discover something that he does not have. So you’re some kind of a threat to him. This kind of psychology is in operation when we view oppressed people and we are angry with them because of their particular kind of behavior, or their particular kind of deviation from the established norm.

Remember, we have not established a revolutionary value system; we are only in the process of establishing it. I do not remember our ever constituting any value that said that a revolutionary must say offensive things towards homosexuals, or that a revolutionary should make sure that women do not speak out about their own particular kind of oppression. As a matter of fact, it is just the opposite: we say that we recognize the women’s right to be free. We have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.

And what made them homosexual? Perhaps it’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand entirely. Some people say that it is the decadence of capitalism. I don’t know if that is the case; I rather doubt it. But whatever the case is, we know that homosexuality is a fact that exists, and we must understand it in its purest form: that is, a person should have the freedom to use his body in whatever way he wants.

That is not endorsing things in homosexuality that we wouldn’t view as revolutionary. But there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.

When we have revolutionary conferences, rallies, and demonstrations, there should be full participation of the gay liberation movement and the women’s liberation movement. Some groups might be more revolutionary than others. We should not use the actions of a few to say that they are all reactionary or counter-revolutionary, because they are not.

We should deal with the factions just as we deal with any other group or party that claims to be revolutionary. We should try to judge, somehow, whether they are operating in a sincere revolutionary fashion and from a really oppressed situation. (And we will grant that if they are women they are probably oppressed.) If they do things that are unrevolutionary or counter-revolutionary, then criticize that action.

If we feel that the group in spirit means to be revolutionary in practice, but they make mistakes in interpretation of the revolutionary philosophy, or they do not understand the dialectics of the social forces in operation, we should criticize that and not criticize them because they are women trying to be free. And the same is true for homosexuals. We should never say a whole movement is dishonest when in fact they are trying to be honest. They are just making honest mistakes. Friends are allowed to make mistakes. The enemy is not allowed to make mistakes because his whole existence is a mistake, and we suffer from it. But the women’s liberation front and gay liberation front are our friends, they are our potential allies, and we need as many allies as possible.

We should be willing to discuss the insecurities that many people have about homosexuality. When I say “insecurities,” I mean the fear that they are some kind of threat to our manhood. I can understand this fear. Because of the long conditioning process which builds insecurity in the American male, homosexuality might produce certain hang-ups in us. I have hang-ups myself about male homosexuality. But on the other hand, I have no hang-up about female homosexuality. And that is a phenomenon in itself. I think it is probably because male homosexuality is a threat to me and female homosexuality is not.

We should be careful about using those terms that might turn our friends off. The terms “faggot” and “punk” should be deleted from our vocabulary, and especially we should not attach names normally designed for homosexuals to men who are enemies of the people, such as [Richard] Nixon or [John] Mitchell. Homosexuals are not enemies of the people.

We should try to form a working coalition with the gay liberation and women’s liberation groups. We must always handle social forces in the most appropriate manner.

Note:

I will only add here that many of us in the early days of the “Gay” rights movement felt empowered by Huey P. Newton’s speech and knew then that we had been accepted by a man we regarded as a revolutionary leader in the struggle for liberation of the people. We have many times over the years expressed deep thanks to Huey P. Newton for this letter and his support.