Archive for the ‘Cops are not our friend’ Category

and some gay person whined, “But there are queer cops.” Hey honey get your politicks right. There maybe gay and lesbian cops or tools of the state but a queer wouldn’t be caught dead as a cop.

One of our readers who disagrees with us more than agrees once told punkpink to keep his big pink snout out of Hartford as pink left this area and move way up near the Canadian border to a small town in Vermont. Well answered punkpink I still come down to Hartford every few months stopping off on my way to NYC to visit Avery Jones, May Day and Cassey Role and I use to write for this publication and you can keep your dingy little nose out of my business. My, my said Sara that old punkpink sure can get rattled. Well here is a little something that punkpink wrote while visiting us awhile back, right before our big move out of town to the other side of the river. There is a war going on and it is a war for the very soul of the LGBTQ community. The lines are being drawn deep in the sand. Hopefully more folks than not will come to realize that the way we have been going about things is very small. So old pink is here to give a push.

Following the Rainbow Trinkets and Corporate Love in OUT CT Tribe.

by punkpink

So the trinket tribe has announced the publication of OUTINCT the yearly guide to everything pride in the capitol city Hartford. It seems to be a yearly publication out in June and remains until September when the annual Pride is held in Hartford Ct. Word to the wise while you sardine yourselves on little old Pratt Street watch out for the pickpockets, the let me bump your hot ass crowd, and the bloated heads of the organizers.

According to them: Why list your organization/business with OUTINCT.COM

“By supporting us you help provide opportunities to generate celebratory, cultural, artistic & educational events which affirm the lives of the LGBT+ community in Connecticut. Your support will spirit people and our allies through activities that will promote unity, inclusion, and awareness of sexual & gender diversity.”

It all depends where you are coming from. Whose culture? Whose artistic and educational events? What events?  

Here is the best one yet for subscribing and supporting the trinket tribe: (more…)

From Fight Back News

45,000 Demand Queer Liberation in NYC
By Michela Martinazzi | June 30, 2019
Read more articles in LGBTQ

Members of the Committee to Stop FBI Repression in alternative Pride march. (FightBack!News/Staff)

New York, NY – On Sunday, June 30, 45,000 marched in the alternative Pride in protest of the corporatized World Pride event happening at the same time. The rally and march were organized by the Reclaim Pride Coalition, which formed as a response to last year’s Manhattan Pride celebration.

Every year, the city of Manhattan hosts one of the largest Pride parades in the world. As Manhattan is the birthplace of Pride, it’s fitting that the city should celebrate the monumental event of the Stonewall riots. However, as decades pass, Pride has turned from a militant march to a corporate parade. Last year was exceptionally glaring, as all the activists and organizers were placed at the end of the parade to let the cops, banks, electoral candidates, etc. lead the parade. A few groups attempted to resist and protest at the Pride parade last year, but it was clear that what was once a space for queer people to fight back had been taken over by corporate interests.

Organizers stated, “The 2019 Queer Liberation March is a people’s political march – no corporate floats, and no police in our march. This is a truly grassroots action that will mobilize the community to address the many social and political battles that continue to be fought locally, nationally and globally. We recognize the powerful legacy of the Stonewall Rebellion by highlighting the most marginalized members of our community.”

The march kicked off at Sheridan Square, opposite the Stonewall Inn, and thousands marched uptown to Bryant Park, where they picked up several thousands more. The route followed the original route marched by the Gay Liberation Front on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Riot.
Throughout the whole march, people chanted about everything from Palestine, Black Lives Matter, immigration, to anti-war and anti-cop. Whenever the marchers passed an anti-people establishment, such as Chik-Fil-A or a Trump building, they would rowdily chant at it.

The march was completely unpermitted with very few cops present. The march ended in Central Park on the Great Lawn. Everyone gathered to listen to speeches, music, and celebrate being queer and militant. The rally opened with living members of the Gay Liberation Front, many who had been at Stonewall on that fateful evening. Speeches talked about needing queer liberation alongside the liberation of Palestine, fighting for climate change, acknowledging that they were speaking on stolen land, and needing a revolution to fully be free. The messaging of the day was that we will not be free until all of us are.

Check out photo’s and more at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/reclaimpridenyc/

 

Well I do. I was a bum then and I will be a bum until the day I die. But you know what the Capitalist, the cop, the corporations are bigger and meaner and the most nasty parasites on the face of the earth. So for this weekend enjoy being a bum, outside this dirty rotten system. For our weekend music enjoyment series let’s listen to Barbara Dane sing a reworked old IWW song, “Hallelujah, I’m a Bum.”

Kent State songs: https://rateyourmusic.com/list/JBrumm… A collection of Vietnam War songs by Barbara Dane and GI’s, called “FTA! Songs of the GI Resistance” (1970). It included the song “Hallelujah, I’m a Bum” – this was a response to Nixon’s comment on 30 April 1970 (just before the Kent State shooting) when he spoke at the Pentagon, saying “you see these bums, you know, blowing up the campuses”. The Washington Post ran the headline “Nixon denounces campus ‘bums’ who burn books”, while the New York Times declared that “Nixon puts ‘bums’ label on some college radicals”. A father of one of those killed at Kent State later told a reporter that “My child was not a bum”. “Oh bums of the earth, you’ve got nothing to loose But the chains and the tear gas, the Dick Nixon blues Hallelujah, I’m a Bum, hallelujah, who are you?… When he first called us bums, didn’t know what he meant But the guards defined it on the campus at Kent… Well power corrupts, we know that by heart But you got to admit Nixon had a head start… Well, some say his name Is slippery Dick Well I guess he is no bum, be he sure is some (dick)”

Why Stonewall is Important a Half Century Later

*

What is the relevance of the 1969 LGBT Stonewall Rebellion to today’s world?

At a time of unchecked bigotry in official politics and endless US-supported wars and drone bombings abroad, explore how the early LGBT liberation movement successfully confronted generations of institutionalized anti-gay hate.

The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion will no doubt bring forth corporate LGBTs and their hangers-on attempting to purge it of its profoundly radical content.

But as a riot it was quintessentially radical, and vehemently opposed to established authority. A long oppressed minority, stereotyped as weak and hopelessly marginal – successfully fought back against the brutality dished out by New York cops used to getting their own way. In so doing, they established a movement to which every out person today owes a huge debt for allowing us to more freely enjoy our lives.

Rather than get a superficial analysis of Stonewall from “moderates,” come to a panel of proudly radical LGBTQs to discuss why Stonewall was important, and what clues it gives to how we can defeat the Right today.

7 PM, Friday, May 17

Berger Park Cultural Center

6205 N. Sheridan Road, Chicago
corner of Granville Avenue & Sheridan Road
3 blocks east of the “Granville” Red Line el stop
Wheelchair accessible – please use the south entrance

Stonewall was a

REBELLION

Against Police Brutality!

Fight On!