Archive for the ‘Cops are not our friend’ Category

Years ago the Imperialist Uncle Scam, the U.S led by George Bush invaded Iraq and destroyed a civilization based on a pack of lies. A group of us Queers were at a antiwar demonstration, passing out leaflets denouncing the war, waving the rainbow flag and chanting along with the best of them. This was nothing new for some of us since we had been demonstrating against war since the invasion of Vietnam by the U.S. A leftist who for the life of me I can’t remember her name came up to us and said, “I thought you gays were only interested in marriage.” This was said to us almost as a put down by one of the organizers of the rally where speaker after speaker never once mentioned the LGBTQ community. A couple of times of course in the apporiate place I had to yell out, something like, “that affects the Queer Community also,” or “you’re forgetting the LGBT community”, or “Queers too!” I think many in the audience listening to the speakers were a bit taken back as you know that those who are chosen to speak, know their subject that is why they are standing up there, telling all of us what is and what isn’t. ( a topic for a whole other article) “Leaders”, as May Riley says, “Oh what do we do with those who call themselves Leader?”) Whenever Queers Without Borders held an event, Frank would bring along his speaker system, Timmy or Richard would decorate their pull along shopping cart, and a open speak out would be held. We wanted to hear what everyone had to say, not just the chosen few. You know that one idea pushes another idea? Well a lot of ideas push a lot of ideas and we always thought we ended up in a much better place.

Below is one of the antiwar leaflets that Queers Without Borders passed out a demo’s in Hartford.

I got to thinking about this again over the past few months when Jerimarie Liesegang, the mother of the Ct. Transgender movement, and I have been doing a lot of research on the LGBTQI+ communities using a timeline that I did for the exhibition Challenging and Changing America The Struggle for LGBT Civil Rights 1900-1999 among other items of research. We now are on the 3rd video in our collaboration a look at the LGBT movement, The Radicals vrs. the Reformists. (soon to be released) I got to thinking again about unions, the work place, and the struggle for basic civil rights. I got to thinking again that most of us, yes I would say a good percentage of us are working class queers and what did the struggle for human rights in the workplace mean for us, how do we approach unions and how do unions approach the LGBTQI+ communties. I remembered a few sections of the timeline that I wanted to explore more fully so began this posting for Furbirdsqueerly.

This work is gleaned from many sources and put together as a collage in the service of the people.

The cause of labor should be the cause of every LGBT person. Our shared struggle is one of the most critical movements in America today. In this the age of trump and the rise of the right-wing gun toting fascists’, the right to work, get paid a living wage, and share in the fruits of your labor is being eroded week by week. Collective bargaining is one of the only tools in our tool belt that allows us to push back against this tide of income inequality and demand our fair share of the economic pie. Not crumbs mind you, never crumbs shaken from the rich man’s table, and even not a piece of the pie, but honest pay and then some. I think of the line from Solidarity Forever, Without Us Not A Single Wheel Would Turn. Pay that every worker can live on. Honest pay that is ours not the bosses, not the owners, and not the wealthy. Not $15 per hour as some unions say, (in Part 2 we will tell you why and do the math.) Nope we are not bowing and scraping and enjoying those table cloth crumbs. We do not live for pie in the sky.  But in this struggle we must be aware from union-busting corporations, to state legislative all out efforts to dismantle workers’ rights, America’s unions have never faced attacks from so many angles at once. As we know and Jerimarie and I have proven in our research, far too often, the LGBT community of today turns a blind eye to these struggles. The elite leadership of the LGBT movement is drunk with their own wins of marriage and “gays” in the military, yeah folks go kill brown people all over the world in the name of equality, and their one issue agenda of and for the elite among our community. (more on that later) But first we demand unity with the workers of the world and the workers of the world demand the same from us.

WORKERS OF THE WORLD UNITE, YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE BUT YOUR CHAINS!     (1)

Let us start this essay using a few dates and information from the original timeline of 1999 and other postings from this site. Here are some of the LGBT people who were activists in support of workers and show that the LGBTQ common struggle is with the labor movement.

From Challenging and Changing America: The Struggle for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Civil Rights 1900-1999.

Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman a Russian born Feminist, and Anarchist, though not a Lesbian or Bisexual according to most historians was a strong supporter of our people. When asked in 1900 when living in the U.S how could she dare to come out in support of Oscar Wilde she replied, “Nonsense no daring is needed to protest great injustice.”  ( 2 ) Goldman spoke out in support of freedom of expression, women’s equality, birth control, sexual freedom, workers rights and was a champion of the rights of homosexuals’ and those who were bisexual or transgender. (more…)

The Madame Defarge Knitting Club East has nominated for the Jerks of the year award  Preston McGraw and Alexandre Olivier Mobile Alabama USA. Way beyond poor taste. As Milly said, This photo of these guys make me more committed in the fact of which side I am on and I know full well it is not on the side of the grinning buffoons.

In this photo posted to Facebook, two police officers from Mobile, Alabama pose with a “quilt” made from cardboard signs confiscated from homeless people in the area over the Christmas break.

“Wanna wish everybody in the 4th precinct a Merry Christmas, especially our captain,” says the caption to the posting. “Hope you enjoy our homeless quilt. Sincerely Panhandler patrol.”
Al.com names the two grinning officers as Preston McGraw and Alexandre Olivier, and points out that the photo was taken in a police department office. It was first posted to Officer McGraw’s page, but has been shared widely since.

Mobile Police Department has not responded to a request for comment. AL.com also emailed every city council member for comment. No one has yet responded.
Since being posted online the image has been shared more than 10,000 times and has over 3,000 comments. Many comments claim the image to be in poor taste, especially during the holiday season.

and Commissar Gritty on Facebook came up with this:

The Madame Defarge Knitting Circle East fully supports the photo by Commissar Gritty.

and some gay person whined, “But there are queer cops.” Hey honey get your politicks right. There maybe gay and lesbian cops or tools of the state but a queer wouldn’t be caught dead as a cop.

One of our readers who disagrees with us more than agrees once told punkpink to keep his big pink snout out of Hartford as pink left this area and move way up near the Canadian border to a small town in Vermont. Well answered punkpink I still come down to Hartford every few months stopping off on my way to NYC to visit Avery Jones, May Day and Cassey Role and I use to write for this publication and you can keep your dingy little nose out of my business. My, my said Sara that old punkpink sure can get rattled. Well here is a little something that punkpink wrote while visiting us awhile back, right before our big move out of town to the other side of the river. There is a war going on and it is a war for the very soul of the LGBTQ community. The lines are being drawn deep in the sand. Hopefully more folks than not will come to realize that the way we have been going about things is very small. So old pink is here to give a push.

Following the Rainbow Trinkets and Corporate Love in OUT CT Tribe.

by punkpink

So the trinket tribe has announced the publication of OUTINCT the yearly guide to everything pride in the capitol city Hartford. It seems to be a yearly publication out in June and remains until September when the annual Pride is held in Hartford Ct. Word to the wise while you sardine yourselves on little old Pratt Street watch out for the pickpockets, the let me bump your hot ass crowd, and the bloated heads of the organizers.

According to them: Why list your organization/business with OUTINCT.COM

“By supporting us you help provide opportunities to generate celebratory, cultural, artistic & educational events which affirm the lives of the LGBT+ community in Connecticut. Your support will spirit people and our allies through activities that will promote unity, inclusion, and awareness of sexual & gender diversity.”

It all depends where you are coming from. Whose culture? Whose artistic and educational events? What events?  

Here is the best one yet for subscribing and supporting the trinket tribe: (more…)

From Fight Back News

45,000 Demand Queer Liberation in NYC
By Michela Martinazzi | June 30, 2019
Read more articles in LGBTQ

Members of the Committee to Stop FBI Repression in alternative Pride march. (FightBack!News/Staff)

New York, NY – On Sunday, June 30, 45,000 marched in the alternative Pride in protest of the corporatized World Pride event happening at the same time. The rally and march were organized by the Reclaim Pride Coalition, which formed as a response to last year’s Manhattan Pride celebration.

Every year, the city of Manhattan hosts one of the largest Pride parades in the world. As Manhattan is the birthplace of Pride, it’s fitting that the city should celebrate the monumental event of the Stonewall riots. However, as decades pass, Pride has turned from a militant march to a corporate parade. Last year was exceptionally glaring, as all the activists and organizers were placed at the end of the parade to let the cops, banks, electoral candidates, etc. lead the parade. A few groups attempted to resist and protest at the Pride parade last year, but it was clear that what was once a space for queer people to fight back had been taken over by corporate interests.

Organizers stated, “The 2019 Queer Liberation March is a people’s political march – no corporate floats, and no police in our march. This is a truly grassroots action that will mobilize the community to address the many social and political battles that continue to be fought locally, nationally and globally. We recognize the powerful legacy of the Stonewall Rebellion by highlighting the most marginalized members of our community.”

The march kicked off at Sheridan Square, opposite the Stonewall Inn, and thousands marched uptown to Bryant Park, where they picked up several thousands more. The route followed the original route marched by the Gay Liberation Front on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Riot.
Throughout the whole march, people chanted about everything from Palestine, Black Lives Matter, immigration, to anti-war and anti-cop. Whenever the marchers passed an anti-people establishment, such as Chik-Fil-A or a Trump building, they would rowdily chant at it.

The march was completely unpermitted with very few cops present. The march ended in Central Park on the Great Lawn. Everyone gathered to listen to speeches, music, and celebrate being queer and militant. The rally opened with living members of the Gay Liberation Front, many who had been at Stonewall on that fateful evening. Speeches talked about needing queer liberation alongside the liberation of Palestine, fighting for climate change, acknowledging that they were speaking on stolen land, and needing a revolution to fully be free. The messaging of the day was that we will not be free until all of us are.

Check out photo’s and more at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/reclaimpridenyc/

 

Well I do. I was a bum then and I will be a bum until the day I die. But you know what the Capitalist, the cop, the corporations are bigger and meaner and the most nasty parasites on the face of the earth. So for this weekend enjoy being a bum, outside this dirty rotten system. For our weekend music enjoyment series let’s listen to Barbara Dane sing a reworked old IWW song, “Hallelujah, I’m a Bum.”

Kent State songs: https://rateyourmusic.com/list/JBrumm… A collection of Vietnam War songs by Barbara Dane and GI’s, called “FTA! Songs of the GI Resistance” (1970). It included the song “Hallelujah, I’m a Bum” – this was a response to Nixon’s comment on 30 April 1970 (just before the Kent State shooting) when he spoke at the Pentagon, saying “you see these bums, you know, blowing up the campuses”. The Washington Post ran the headline “Nixon denounces campus ‘bums’ who burn books”, while the New York Times declared that “Nixon puts ‘bums’ label on some college radicals”. A father of one of those killed at Kent State later told a reporter that “My child was not a bum”. “Oh bums of the earth, you’ve got nothing to loose But the chains and the tear gas, the Dick Nixon blues Hallelujah, I’m a Bum, hallelujah, who are you?… When he first called us bums, didn’t know what he meant But the guards defined it on the campus at Kent… Well power corrupts, we know that by heart But you got to admit Nixon had a head start… Well, some say his name Is slippery Dick Well I guess he is no bum, be he sure is some (dick)”