Archive for the ‘Fight Back’ Category

Oh say can you see Amerikkka? Can you see your Blue, White and Scarlett hypocrisy? By the dawns early light, day light, night light or midnight we can. Here are those men, those white men rebelling against the crown who thought nothing of owning slaves. Their freedom from what they perceived as tyranny was nothing compared to what the enslaved went through in this land of “all men are created Equal.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” —

We read this from Hyperallergic. 

John Trumbull’s painting “Declaration of Independence,” which hangs in the rotunda of the US Capitol, commemorates the document that freed the United States, formerly the 13 British colonies, from European rule in 1776. The concept of freedom, though, was severely limited: slavery was only abolished nearly a century later, and its reverberations of racist violence and mass incarceration subjugate Black people to this day.

In a poignant illustration of this hypocrisy, Arlen Parsa, a Chicago-based documentary filmmaker, covered the faces of every enslaver in the painting with a red circle: a 34 out of the 47 men pictured, most of whom were signers of the Declaration. (The fact-checking website PolitiFact has corroborated Parsa’s count.)

“There’s a fundamental irony that these men were triumphantly declaring themselves free from what they viewed as the tyranny of King George III — without so much as a thought toward the people who they themselves held in chains much more brutal than 18th-century British taxes,” Parsa told Hyperallergic.

But all is not lost in this land. Remember these opening lines of that document. That document to many is not and was not worth the paper that it was written on.

“When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.”

We see these truths before our very eyes today that all of us are not equal under the law in the U.S but are subjected to racism, Queerphobia, sexism, greed and a building tyranny of fascism. But we also know that in all of the years of working against a unjust system that our fight is a continuing process that we must embrace. The revolution today sweeping amerikkka is just and right. As the song from back in the day said, “We Shall Not Be Moved” no we shall not. Let’s keep on fighting for our daily bread, for justice for Black women and men killed by the cops in this country, let us continue to talk back to those who want to hold us back, to those who support endless war, poverty, the taking away of medical care and protections for the Transgender + communities.

All Power To The People!

From LGBTQ Nation and other sources –Report from New York City

The NYPD may have apologized last year for raiding the Stonewall Inn, spawning days of riots and police brutality, but they apparently haven’t decided to stop the behavior. As Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted about honoring Stonewall, the cops were unleashing pepper spray on LGBTQ people dancing in celebration.

Yesterday, as the Queer Liberation March wound down and participants celebrated in nearby Washington Square Park, police charged into the crowd, swinging batons, shoving people to the ground, and arresting a handful of participants. The officers kept their badge numbers covered.

“Using pepper spray against the Black and queer community, beating LGBTQIA+ protestors with batons and bicycles, and intimidating our right to peacefully assemble, reflects the wanton disregard that the mayor, along with the NYPD, have for the lives and safety all Black and queer New Yorkers,” organizers told BuzzFeed News.

“It was very peaceful, very chill. I didn’t see much police presence. Then I saw 20 cops on bikes and a few cop cars speed up right away, so I walked a little quicker,” Eliel Cruz told the outlet. “I walked by five or six people on the ground who were pepper sprayed and were washing their eyes.”

NPYD says they were trying to arrest two people for graffiti when a crowd gathered and started chanting, “Let them go!”

“The man who was arrested was crying and saying he was hurting and the cops were dragging him by his hands so his weight was against his shoulders pulling [on] the sockets,” volunteer Pippa Bianco told Gothamist, saying erupted when two officers in white shirts “sprinted into the crowd and started shoving us.” Another group of cops on motorcycles started pushing their vehicles through the crowd, striking protesters.

“I was leaving Washington square — there was a beautiful rally centering around Black trans women. As we were leaving, we noticed a commotion directly in front of us and realized it was the police,” out city council candidate Marti Gould Cummings said.

“People were chanting ‘don’t shoot’ and many took a knee,” the drag queen candidate added. “The police escalated and used pepper spray and batons.”

“I wish that I could say what I saw today was shocking, but how could I reasonably expect anything else from the NYPD?” said Jake Tolan, one of the March organizers, told LGBTQ Nation in an emailed statement.

“51 years after the Stonewall Rebellion, the NYPD is still responding to peaceful, powerful, righteous queer joy with pepper spray, batons, and handcuffs. Thank you, Commissioner Shea and the entire NYPD, for continuing to show us why you should be abolished.”

For the story and video’s go to HERE. 

https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2020/06/stonewall-anniversary-nypd-launched-brutal-unprovoked-attack-lgbtq-people/?utm_source=LGBTQ+Nation+Subscribers&utm_campaign=c3f736fbdc-20200629_LGBTQ_Nation_Daily_Brief&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c4eab596bd-c3f736fbdc-430445869

To see the NYPD in action, the pigs that they are check it out at: https://nowthisnews.com/news/nypd-shoved-people-used-pepper-spray-during-queer-liberation-march. Eiel Cruz has a good view video of the cops. (note to the younger generation, this is why we call them pigs.)  https://twitter.com/i/status/1277346244952817669

And this video by Matthew Chayes: https://twitter.com/i/status/1277336251239145473 (cop gets pepper sprayed and one falls off his motorcycle.)

To our friends from all over the world. This is what is happening to LGBTQI+ folks 51 years after Stonewall, in the city where it began. Same old shit different year. FIGHT BACK!!!

NOTE from Furbirdsqueerly:

We can only say what we have been saying for years, FUCK THE POLICE. They are not a friend of the LGBTQI+ communities never have been and never will be. Some in the LGBT community think all is okay. We have made it. We can only say No we have not.

RECLAIM PRIDE COALITION ANNOUNCES QUEER LIBERATION MARCH FOR BLACK LIVES AND AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY — SUNDAY, JUNE 28, LEAVING FOLEY SQUARE AT 1PM

MARCH DEMANDS RADICAL CHANGE IN POLICING — FULL FUNDING OF COMMUNITY NEEDS — SAFETY AND HONOR FOR BLACK TRANS LIVES

June 18, 2020, New York City — On Sunday, June 28th, at 1pm, the Reclaim Pride Coalition will be in the streets of Manhattan for its second annual Queer Liberation March — the Queer Liberation March for Black Lives and Against Police Brutality. Marchers will gather at 12:45pm at Foley Square on Centre St and step off at 1pm sharp.

Marchers are asked to wear face masks to protect against COVID-19 and to maintain safe distancing. Reclaim Pride can provide a limited number of masks, hand sanitizer and water to those who need them. And Reclaim Pride will livestream the March online at @queermarch on FB and Twitter/Periscope and via Youtube live on reclaimpridenyc.org for those who can’t attend in person. This March, like all current protest Marches, does not have a City/NYPD permit.

“We’re horrified by the police murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Layleen Polanco, Rayshard Brooks and untold numbers of others,” said Reclaim Pride’s Francesca Barjon, “and we’re mourning the endless violent deaths of Black trans women and men like Dominique ‘Rem’mie’ Fells and Riah Milton. So, inspired by the historic, Black-led protest movement that has taken to the streets here in NYC and across the world, Reclaim Pride supports demands for immediate defunding, disarming, dismantling, and reimagining of police forces.”

Reclaim Pride joins with abolitionists such as Mariambe Kaba and others in several cities in demanding a fifty percent reduction in the NYPD budget with a fifty percent reduction in the police force. Those funds must be dedicated to support and services including housing, healthcare, education and reparative and restorative justice for Black communities. New York City must prioritize reparations for those who’ve been oppressed and murdered for hundreds of years.

While all Black people are at constant risk of police brutality and murder, Reclaim Pride, as queer and trans activists , recognizes that Black Trans, Gender Non-Conforming, and Non Binary people, especially Black Trans Women, are faced with the intersection of vicious state and societal racism, transphobia, misogyny, and classism. This must stop now.

For the complete statement of purpose, go here (or refer to the PDF attached):

RPC 2020 March – Demands & Safety Info

The March will be wheelchair accessible. For other questions about accessibility, contact access@reclaimpridenyc.org.

FB event:  https://www.facebook.com/events/2650793568541801/

Website: www.reclaimpridenyc.org

Facebook: @QueerMarch

Twitter: @QueerMarch

Instagram: @QueerMarch

Reclaim Pride Coalition (RPC) is a New York City-based group comprised of LGBTQ+ activists in alliance with dozens of grassroots community groups, nationally and internationally. In June 2019, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, RPC mobilized more than 45,000 people to recreate the original 1970 Gay Pride march route uptown from Stonewall to Central Park. This March, the Queer Liberation March, was a people’s protest march without corporate funding, corporate floats, or a police contingent.

Reclaim Pride Coalition

THE 2020 QUEER LIBERATION MARCH

FOR BLACK LIVES AND AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY

The Reclaim Pride Coalition has been monitoring events and carefully deliberating to determine the nature of this year’s Queer Liberation March. We have determined that the only way to move forward is to once again have a physical March through the streets of Manhattan on Pride Sunday, June 28. Our March will center the movement for Black Lives and focus on the violence committed against Black bodies by law enforcement and the mass incarceration state.

RPC’s Queer Liberation March for Black Lives and Against Police Brutality will be focused on elevating and protecting Black Lives. This moment, the principles of the 1970 march, and the RPC founding mission demand it. Black Americans and their children have suffered disproportionate abuse at the hands of America’s white supremacist power structure. The most marginalized among Black Communities, like Trans people, Immigrants, Disabled people, Deaf and Hard of Hearing people and Neurologically Diverse people live under an even greater risk for the worst outcomes within this system. Inordinate risk calls for urgent consideration.

Fifty years ago, on June 28th, 1970, the LGBTQ+ movement created the Christopher Street Liberation Day March. It was mounted on the first anniversary of the Stonewall Riots which Trans Women of Color and our community’s Black youth played a crucial role in initiating. That beautiful, intersectional March, produced by the Gay Liberation Front and allies, confronted the same oppression and police brutality that protesters are responding to today. The Gay Liberation Front went on to create an important dialogue and relationship with Huey Newton and The Black Panthers.

RPC is keenly aware that the NYPD is a major problem: Tuesday night, a peaceful march for Trans people of color who have been killed by police and other bigots was attacked by the NYPD. One of our members, Jason Rosenberg, received multiple injuries including a broken arm, and was repeatedly denied medical care while in custody for over 5 hours. Jason was not alone in sustaining injuries or in being denied care that night. And we are certain that the same is true for many of the hundreds of Black protestors arrested over the course of the last week.

The Reclaim Pride Coalition will continue to seek guidance from the Black Queer Community and our Elders to program meaningful actions. We invite our Participating Organizations and individuals to follow suit where appropriate. On June 28th we will all explore what the future of Racial Justice looks like. Join Us.

Location and Time will be announced in the coming days.

Check out the link above for more information.

A new video by Jerimarie Liesegang and Richard Nelson.

How in the world do I introduce such a fine work as this video? How do I introduce such a radical document, a revolutionary video that says what needs to be said? A video that is not afraid to question the LGBT mainstream and in doing so it brings to light some dirty little secrets of the early days of the gay movement. Those days when a handful of people walked out of the Gay Liberation Front because of support for the Black Panthers This group declared themselves to be a one issue movement, only interested in working on issues that concerned gays. Founding what many of us considered to be a wrong road movement by and for an elite who hijacked the very soul of our struggle for liberation. Our struggle for liberation that was entwined with others who were oppressed. A wrong road taken and a road that our movement has been on ever since.

I have been in and out of the movement for many years. After the split from the GLF I found I had more in common with straight leftists then I did with my own people. While watching, working on and viewing Jerimarie’s work in putting this video together I can only say, I am glad that I am not alone. I am happy that throughout the years many people began to question what the mainstream told us was important. We saw through the lies and knew that their hopes and desires were not ours. We knew there was life out from under the straight oppressors thumb and that we had to with all our might break his f-ing measuring stick and smash his measuring scale. Could we do this just by giving a tweak and a tuck here and there? Or did we need to topple and transform the very society we live in? I chose the latter and still do.

We have made gains, or what we can consider gains in the past years, but I stop and ask, What alliances have we made with others who are oppressed? Who do we stand with and who will stand with us? What have we brought to the table of the new day? Many of us know where we have come from, we know where we are now, but where we are going is a real slippery slope.

We dedicate this video to all those who continue to fight for that new day. The new day that includes everyone. To those who are in the streets today over the continuing murder of Black women and men by the cops we stand in solidarity. We dedicate this video as a renewal of our strength to remember just what is important and what is possible. We dedicate this video to the memory of Huey P. Newton whose letter to the Women’s and Gay Liberation movement back in 1970 inspired many of us young gay leftists. We were a part of a revolution sweeping across amerikkka. We then knew, with the issuing of Huey’s letter, that the vote to support the Black Panthers was the correct vote and that we were one in the revolution.

So how do I introduce this video. I say just listen. Listen to the voices outside of the mainstream. Listen to the truth outside of the elite, outside of the white middle-class comfort zone. Listen to those who are surrounded and engulfed by towers of oppression. Listen outside of the want to be included in a system of oppression. There you will find the answer.

 

Uniting together for a common goal. A union of folks on a mission to topple that which opposed our very lives.

One lesson that many of us learned back in the day of our youthful rebellion was the idea if we supported others and their fight for liberation that they in turn would support us and the more support that we had and they had the better off we would all be. Maybe, just maybe we would fight together and we would win. A union of different folks together in a common goal, united to fight for a common purpose our liberation against the state. To topple and transform the institutions what a wonderful idea!

In the early days of the L and G movement that idea was lost when a wrong road was taken by members of the Gay Liberation Front who walked out of a meeting at a very crucial time. This time as many of us know who studied or lived our history was the meeting to vote on support for the Black Panther Party. Those who walked out of the multi-issue GLF founded that December the Gay Activist Alliance. Now the GAA was a lot like some of the conservative groups that Harry Hay warned us about, those who only wanted to work on their issues, that is what has been described as the white comfortable gay male issues and fuck everyone else and their issues. We going to get ours and the heck with you. Wrong road boys and girls wrong road.

One thing we learned in union organizing is that we must stick together, and as the old song goes, “What force on earth is weaker than the feeble force of one?” Solidarity across all lines that is how a revolution is made and is won. But the boys and girls back then didn’t see that as the boys and girls operating from their elite non-profit mainstream LGBT organizations don’t see it now. Their little lobbying groups who will only go so far so not to upset the man and his yardstick. The straight man that is. You know that old saying, “we are not different from you, except for what we do in bed.” You have heard about it, we all must look a certain way, to fit in. Men in suits, women in dresses. No butches, fems, no drag queens, no far out types. Look normal! Ding dong hear the wedding bells, go drop some bombs on the little brown girl at her sewing machine. Conform! Fit in! Oh what we do for the love of mommy and daddy! One has to wonder did anyone of these folks even stop to question the very system that they clamored to be a part of? Did they even understand that perhaps not all inclusion was good inclusion? That what they had fled from was no place to return to?

Yes the movement took a wrong road back then, the GAA didn’t see that our liberation was tied into the liberation of the Panthers, the Young Lords, the grape pickers, women, those who fought for civil rights of Black amerikkka and anyone who was or is the outcast. They didn’t see that everyone who called out against the oppressor was leading us towards freedom. A new freedom. No they only could see to the end of their own nose. Their desires and wants should be everybody’s wants and desires.  But that is where everyone was and wanted to be. By 1970 the multi-issue Gay Liberation Front had all but disappeared from the New York political scene and with it the idea that none of us are free unless all of us are. I remember it well and I remember how hard it was to share a revolutionary vision with those not willing to share with all others. I found that I had more in common with those on the left than my own people. This article is just another attempt to free us from the BS of the “We must fit in movement.” We can only say that those who want the man so bad, those who want the ruler, the measuring stick of the straight world, then how can you be our friends and comrades. How can you believe in a one issue movement and fight in a one issue struggle when we know damn well the old slogan, “We are here, there and everywhere,” is the truth?

We are going in this essay to hear about some folks who rejected that type of organizing. Those who can today be called our true revolutionaries who looked beyond their self and fought back.

This work, a collage is gleaned from many sources in the service of the people.

We decided to start each of these articles with The International. Here is the updated version as written and sung by Billy Bragg after a challenge from Pete Seeger.

The Patterson Silk Strike

(more…)

Years ago the Imperialist Uncle Scam, the U.S led by George Bush invaded Iraq and destroyed a civilization based on a pack of lies. A group of us Queers were at a antiwar demonstration, passing out leaflets denouncing the war, waving the rainbow flag and chanting along with the best of them. This was nothing new for some of us since we had been demonstrating against war since the invasion of Vietnam by the U.S. A leftist who for the life of me I can’t remember her name came up to us and said, “I thought you gays were only interested in marriage.” This was said to us almost as a put down by one of the organizers of the rally where speaker after speaker never once mentioned the LGBTQ community. A couple of times of course in the apporiate place I had to yell out, something like, “that affects the Queer Community also,” or “you’re forgetting the LGBT community”, or “Queers too!” I think many in the audience listening to the speakers were a bit taken back as you know that those who are chosen to speak, know their subject that is why they are standing up there, telling all of us what is and what isn’t. ( a topic for a whole other article) “Leaders”, as May Riley says, “Oh what do we do with those who call themselves Leader?”) Whenever Queers Without Borders held an event, Frank would bring along his speaker system, Timmy or Richard would decorate their pull along shopping cart, and a open speak out would be held. We wanted to hear what everyone had to say, not just the chosen few. You know that one idea pushes another idea? Well a lot of ideas push a lot of ideas and we always thought we ended up in a much better place.

Below is one of the antiwar leaflets that Queers Without Borders passed out a demo’s in Hartford.

I got to thinking about this again over the past few months when Jerimarie Liesegang, the mother of the Ct. Transgender movement, and I have been doing a lot of research on the LGBTQI+ communities using a timeline that I did for the exhibition Challenging and Changing America The Struggle for LGBT Civil Rights 1900-1999 among other items of research. We now are on the 3rd video in our collaboration a look at the LGBT movement, The Radicals vrs. the Reformists. (soon to be released) I got to thinking again about unions, the work place, and the struggle for basic civil rights. I got to thinking again that most of us, yes I would say a good percentage of us are working class queers and what did the struggle for human rights in the workplace mean for us, how do we approach unions and how do unions approach the LGBTQI+ communties. I remembered a few sections of the timeline that I wanted to explore more fully so began this posting for Furbirdsqueerly.

This work is gleaned from many sources and put together as a collage in the service of the people.

The cause of labor should be the cause of every LGBT person. Our shared struggle is one of the most critical movements in America today. In this the age of trump and the rise of the right-wing gun toting fascists’, the right to work, get paid a living wage, and share in the fruits of your labor is being eroded week by week. Collective bargaining is one of the only tools in our tool belt that allows us to push back against this tide of income inequality and demand our fair share of the economic pie. Not crumbs mind you, never crumbs shaken from the rich man’s table, and even not a piece of the pie, but honest pay and then some. I think of the line from Solidarity Forever, Without Us Not A Single Wheel Would Turn. Pay that every worker can live on. Honest pay that is ours not the bosses, not the owners, and not the wealthy. Not $15 per hour as some unions say, (in Part 2 we will tell you why and do the math.) Nope we are not bowing and scraping and enjoying those table cloth crumbs. We do not live for pie in the sky.  But in this struggle we must be aware from union-busting corporations, to state legislative all out efforts to dismantle workers’ rights, America’s unions have never faced attacks from so many angles at once. As we know and Jerimarie and I have proven in our research, far too often, the LGBT community of today turns a blind eye to these struggles. The elite leadership of the LGBT movement is drunk with their own wins of marriage and “gays” in the military, yeah folks go kill brown people all over the world in the name of equality, and their one issue agenda of and for the elite among our community. (more on that later) But first we demand unity with the workers of the world and the workers of the world demand the same from us.

WORKERS OF THE WORLD UNITE, YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE BUT YOUR CHAINS!     (1)

Let us start this essay using a few dates and information from the original timeline of 1999 and other postings from this site. Here are some of the LGBT people who were activists in support of workers and show that the LGBTQ common struggle is with the labor movement.

From Challenging and Changing America: The Struggle for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Civil Rights 1900-1999.

Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman a Russian born Feminist, and Anarchist, though not a Lesbian or Bisexual according to most historians was a strong supporter of our people. When asked in 1900 when living in the U.S how could she dare to come out in support of Oscar Wilde she replied, “Nonsense no daring is needed to protest great injustice.”  ( 2 ) Goldman spoke out in support of freedom of expression, women’s equality, birth control, sexual freedom, workers rights and was a champion of the rights of homosexuals’ and those who were bisexual or transgender. (more…)

Here are three video’s on the LGBTQI+ struggle. Videos by Jerimarie Liesegang and Richard Nelson.

Sylvia Rivera, She was more than Stonewall.

 

 

Queers Without Borders Presents;  Ct. LGBT History 1960-2000

 

 

Ct. Transgender Movement.

 

 

Enjoy these three videos A collage in the service of the people.

and we call the U.S. government to court.