Archive for the ‘For your information’ Category

RECLAIM PRIDE COALITION ANNOUNCES QUEER LIBERATION MARCH FOR BLACK LIVES AND AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY — SUNDAY, JUNE 28, LEAVING FOLEY SQUARE AT 1PM

MARCH DEMANDS RADICAL CHANGE IN POLICING — FULL FUNDING OF COMMUNITY NEEDS — SAFETY AND HONOR FOR BLACK TRANS LIVES

June 18, 2020, New York City — On Sunday, June 28th, at 1pm, the Reclaim Pride Coalition will be in the streets of Manhattan for its second annual Queer Liberation March — the Queer Liberation March for Black Lives and Against Police Brutality. Marchers will gather at 12:45pm at Foley Square on Centre St and step off at 1pm sharp.

Marchers are asked to wear face masks to protect against COVID-19 and to maintain safe distancing. Reclaim Pride can provide a limited number of masks, hand sanitizer and water to those who need them. And Reclaim Pride will livestream the March online at @queermarch on FB and Twitter/Periscope and via Youtube live on reclaimpridenyc.org for those who can’t attend in person. This March, like all current protest Marches, does not have a City/NYPD permit.

“We’re horrified by the police murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Layleen Polanco, Rayshard Brooks and untold numbers of others,” said Reclaim Pride’s Francesca Barjon, “and we’re mourning the endless violent deaths of Black trans women and men like Dominique ‘Rem’mie’ Fells and Riah Milton. So, inspired by the historic, Black-led protest movement that has taken to the streets here in NYC and across the world, Reclaim Pride supports demands for immediate defunding, disarming, dismantling, and reimagining of police forces.”

Reclaim Pride joins with abolitionists such as Mariambe Kaba and others in several cities in demanding a fifty percent reduction in the NYPD budget with a fifty percent reduction in the police force. Those funds must be dedicated to support and services including housing, healthcare, education and reparative and restorative justice for Black communities. New York City must prioritize reparations for those who’ve been oppressed and murdered for hundreds of years.

While all Black people are at constant risk of police brutality and murder, Reclaim Pride, as queer and trans activists , recognizes that Black Trans, Gender Non-Conforming, and Non Binary people, especially Black Trans Women, are faced with the intersection of vicious state and societal racism, transphobia, misogyny, and classism. This must stop now.

For the complete statement of purpose, go here (or refer to the PDF attached):

RPC 2020 March – Demands & Safety Info

The March will be wheelchair accessible. For other questions about accessibility, contact access@reclaimpridenyc.org.

FB event:  https://www.facebook.com/events/2650793568541801/

Website: www.reclaimpridenyc.org

Facebook: @QueerMarch

Twitter: @QueerMarch

Instagram: @QueerMarch

Reclaim Pride Coalition (RPC) is a New York City-based group comprised of LGBTQ+ activists in alliance with dozens of grassroots community groups, nationally and internationally. In June 2019, to mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, RPC mobilized more than 45,000 people to recreate the original 1970 Gay Pride march route uptown from Stonewall to Central Park. This March, the Queer Liberation March, was a people’s protest march without corporate funding, corporate floats, or a police contingent.

Reclaim Pride Coalition

THE 2020 QUEER LIBERATION MARCH

FOR BLACK LIVES AND AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY

The Reclaim Pride Coalition has been monitoring events and carefully deliberating to determine the nature of this year’s Queer Liberation March. We have determined that the only way to move forward is to once again have a physical March through the streets of Manhattan on Pride Sunday, June 28. Our March will center the movement for Black Lives and focus on the violence committed against Black bodies by law enforcement and the mass incarceration state.

RPC’s Queer Liberation March for Black Lives and Against Police Brutality will be focused on elevating and protecting Black Lives. This moment, the principles of the 1970 march, and the RPC founding mission demand it. Black Americans and their children have suffered disproportionate abuse at the hands of America’s white supremacist power structure. The most marginalized among Black Communities, like Trans people, Immigrants, Disabled people, Deaf and Hard of Hearing people and Neurologically Diverse people live under an even greater risk for the worst outcomes within this system. Inordinate risk calls for urgent consideration.

Fifty years ago, on June 28th, 1970, the LGBTQ+ movement created the Christopher Street Liberation Day March. It was mounted on the first anniversary of the Stonewall Riots which Trans Women of Color and our community’s Black youth played a crucial role in initiating. That beautiful, intersectional March, produced by the Gay Liberation Front and allies, confronted the same oppression and police brutality that protesters are responding to today. The Gay Liberation Front went on to create an important dialogue and relationship with Huey Newton and The Black Panthers.

RPC is keenly aware that the NYPD is a major problem: Tuesday night, a peaceful march for Trans people of color who have been killed by police and other bigots was attacked by the NYPD. One of our members, Jason Rosenberg, received multiple injuries including a broken arm, and was repeatedly denied medical care while in custody for over 5 hours. Jason was not alone in sustaining injuries or in being denied care that night. And we are certain that the same is true for many of the hundreds of Black protestors arrested over the course of the last week.

The Reclaim Pride Coalition will continue to seek guidance from the Black Queer Community and our Elders to program meaningful actions. We invite our Participating Organizations and individuals to follow suit where appropriate. On June 28th we will all explore what the future of Racial Justice looks like. Join Us.

Location and Time will be announced in the coming days.

Check out the link above for more information.

Uniting together for a common goal. A union of folks on a mission to topple that which opposed our very lives.

One lesson that many of us learned back in the day of our youthful rebellion was the idea if we supported others and their fight for liberation that they in turn would support us and the more support that we had and they had the better off we would all be. Maybe, just maybe we would fight together and we would win. A union of different folks together in a common goal, united to fight for a common purpose our liberation against the state. To topple and transform the institutions what a wonderful idea!

In the early days of the L and G movement that idea was lost when a wrong road was taken by members of the Gay Liberation Front who walked out of a meeting at a very crucial time. This time as many of us know who studied or lived our history was the meeting to vote on support for the Black Panther Party. Those who walked out of the multi-issue GLF founded that December the Gay Activist Alliance. Now the GAA was a lot like some of the conservative groups that Harry Hay warned us about, those who only wanted to work on their issues, that is what has been described as the white comfortable gay male issues and fuck everyone else and their issues. We going to get ours and the heck with you. Wrong road boys and girls wrong road.

One thing we learned in union organizing is that we must stick together, and as the old song goes, “What force on earth is weaker than the feeble force of one?” Solidarity across all lines that is how a revolution is made and is won. But the boys and girls back then didn’t see that as the boys and girls operating from their elite non-profit mainstream LGBT organizations don’t see it now. Their little lobbying groups who will only go so far so not to upset the man and his yardstick. The straight man that is. You know that old saying, “we are not different from you, except for what we do in bed.” You have heard about it, we all must look a certain way, to fit in. Men in suits, women in dresses. No butches, fems, no drag queens, no far out types. Look normal! Ding dong hear the wedding bells, go drop some bombs on the little brown girl at her sewing machine. Conform! Fit in! Oh what we do for the love of mommy and daddy! One has to wonder did anyone of these folks even stop to question the very system that they clamored to be a part of? Did they even understand that perhaps not all inclusion was good inclusion? That what they had fled from was no place to return to?

Yes the movement took a wrong road back then, the GAA didn’t see that our liberation was tied into the liberation of the Panthers, the Young Lords, the grape pickers, women, those who fought for civil rights of Black amerikkka and anyone who was or is the outcast. They didn’t see that everyone who called out against the oppressor was leading us towards freedom. A new freedom. No they only could see to the end of their own nose. Their desires and wants should be everybody’s wants and desires.  But that is where everyone was and wanted to be. By 1970 the multi-issue Gay Liberation Front had all but disappeared from the New York political scene and with it the idea that none of us are free unless all of us are. I remember it well and I remember how hard it was to share a revolutionary vision with those not willing to share with all others. I found that I had more in common with those on the left than my own people. This article is just another attempt to free us from the BS of the “We must fit in movement.” We can only say that those who want the man so bad, those who want the ruler, the measuring stick of the straight world, then how can you be our friends and comrades. How can you believe in a one issue movement and fight in a one issue struggle when we know damn well the old slogan, “We are here, there and everywhere,” is the truth?

We are going in this essay to hear about some folks who rejected that type of organizing. Those who can today be called our true revolutionaries who looked beyond their self and fought back.

This work, a collage is gleaned from many sources in the service of the people.

We decided to start each of these articles with The International. Here is the updated version as written and sung by Billy Bragg after a challenge from Pete Seeger.

The Patterson Silk Strike

(more…)

We had to share this photo that has been passed around on Facebook. Its one of the best as far as fashion for these troubled times. We bet some highfalutin designer will pick up on this and we will see it on the next runway show. If so better pay off these two wonderful young folks, a breath of fresh air if you will, Vikki Van Riper and Dead Gemini.

fashion in these times

And how about fashion from another time:

Secrets Behind the Creepy Plague Doctor Mask and Costume | Ancient ...

Plague doctors wore a mask with a bird-like beak to protect them from being infected by deadly diseases such as the Black Death, which they believed was airborne. … The costume was worn by plague doctors during the Plague of 1656, which killed 145,000 people in Rome and 300,000 in Naples. The beak could hold dried flowers (e.g roses or carnations), herbs (e.g. mint), spices, camphor or a vinegar sponge. The purpose of the mask was to remove bad smells, thought to be the principal cause of the disease. Plague doctors would also commonly carry a cane to examine and direct patients without the need to make direct contact with the patient. The scented materials included juniper berry, ambergris, roses (Rosa), mint (Mentha spicata L.) leaves, camphor, cloves, laudanum, myrrh, and storax.

The Nation published an excellent article that all of us in the LGBTQI+ movement should and must read.

The First Drag Queen Was a Former Slave
Who fought for queer freedom a century before Stonewall.
By Channing Gerard Joseph

The article begins this way:

“His name was William Dorsey Swann, but to his friends he was known as “the Queen.” Both of those names had been forgotten for nearly a century before I rediscovered them while researching at Columbia University. Born in Maryland around 1858, Swann endured slavery, the Civil War, racism, police surveillance, torture behind bars, and many other injustices. But beginning in the 1880s, he not only became the first American activist to lead a queer resistance group; he also became, in the same decade, the first known person to dub himself a “queen of drag”—or, more familiarly, a drag queen. In 1896, after being convicted and sentenced to 10 months in jail on the false charge of “keeping a disorderly house”—a euphemism for running a brothel—Swann demanded (and was denied) a pardon from President Grover Cleveland for holding a drag ball. This, too, was a historic act: It made Swann the earliest recorded American to take specific legal and political steps to defend the queer community’s right to gather without the threat of criminalization, suppression, or police violence.”

The article goes on to say: “My research on Swann began 15 years ago, when I stumbled upon a Washington Post article from April 13, 1888. The headline leaped off the page: “Negro Dive Raided. Thirteen Black Men Dressed as Women Surprised at Supper and Arrested.” According to another news account, more than a dozen escaped as the officers barged in and Swann tried to stop them, boldly telling the police lieutenant in charge, “You is no gentleman.” In the ensuing brawl, the Queen’s “gorgeous dress of cream-colored satin” was torn to shreds. (The fight was also one of the first known instances of violent resistance in the name of LGBTQ rights.)”

And ends this way: “Though the Stonewall uprising of 1969 is often touted as the beginning of the fight for gay liberation, Swann’s courageous example forces us to rethink the history of the movement: when it began, where it came from, and who its leaders were. Coming of age at a time when an entirely new form of freedom and self-​determination was developing for African Americans, Swann and his house of butlers, coachmen, and cooks—the first Americans to regularly hold cross-dressing balls and the first to fight for the right to do so—arguably laid the foundations of contemporary queer celebration and protest.”

The article can be read HERE.

Apologies for the disturbing photo.
If you’re really upset by what you see, than make this go viral along with an email letting Mike Jines know what you think.
info@topgenenergy.net

Before moving to Hartford Ct. I lived in the woods of The Maverick, nine miles outside and over the mountain from Woodstock NY. (1) I lived in what I called an elegant shack the last place going up the mountain. The only modern convenience that I had was electricity. Very rustic living to say the least. It took me one time, one winter morning to understand why the outhouse seat was not attached after what seemed like leaving have the skin on my ass behind on the cold seat. The toilet seat then took up residence behind the woodstove where I cooked, and melted snow to take a bath. Clean water for drinking and cooking was courtesy of the artist I worked for in the summer and in the winter from a woman I did odd jobs for including babysitting her two year old. She was an herbalist and from her I learned about the wild herbs and their healing powers. We collected in the summer, dried the herbs in the old studio at the back of my shack. Screens of Red Clover blossoms, Queen Anne’s Lace seeds, Plantain, tied together in bunches, Yarrow, Tansy, Peppermint, Nettles, Comfrey from the garden. Susan and I would go on nature walks up the mountain and over following old trails. An old farm was our destination long since abandoned where fields of Dandelion awaited us and many of the herbs that Susan used grew in the area. In the fall I picked apples from the abandoned orchard and made applesauce.

During my years on the Maverick I heard many stories about Hervey White and the “good old days” of the artists that gathered there, the festivals, the free love, the feeling of living freely from the powers that tried to tame the creative spirit on the other side of the mountain and in America. Hervey White intrigued me as a revolutionary Socialist, artist, free thinking creative person. Lucille Blanch an artist who came to the Maverick as a young artist and who was still going strong painting daily live in a little white house with a “host of daffodils” growing all along her stonewalls and around her yard. “Just dig up the bulb and throw it, it will come up again,” was her direction in thinning out the plants. I worked for her doing odd jobs and helping out where I could.  But in all my talks with quite a number of folks who lived on the Maverick or who had been living in Woodstock for years no one ever mentioned that Hervey White was a Bisexual man. At the time when he was alive it was a “open secret” or so some say.

Hervey White

Hervey White

“I will do what I like and go where I like without money, paying for my living as I go. Good advice has never driven it out of me.”

So begins our story of a man named Hervey White. A socialist, utopian thinker, Bisexual/Gay man, poet, writer, publisher, builder and philosopher on art and what it could be. White along with  Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead whom he had met at Jane Adams Hull House in Chicago, founded the Brydcliff Art Colony in Woodstock ( 2 ) and after awhile White grew tired of the bourgeois notions of art and life, that was dictated by Whitehead saying of him, “He would only employ people he could dictate to,” White wrote later, “and no self-respecting artist would ever stand for his dictation.”  bought a farm in West Hurley and so began the Maverick art colony. A running joke among some old timers I met in the Maverick was that Hervy White came to this side of the mountain because all the water ran down the other side and he thought that at Byrdcliff people took far too many baths. We read this about Hervey White: In 1905, White purchased a farm just outside Woodstock with Fritz van der Loo and Carl Eric Lindin, intended as a rustic haven for the three friends and their families. It quickly transformed into an intellectual meeting place and was named the Maverick; artists, writers, and musicians took up residence in minimalistic houses, usually little more than shacks, built on the property. White’s short-lived marriage to Byrdcliffe printmaker Vivian Bevans ended in 1908. According to Tom Wolff writing Hervey White”s Maverick Community and Its Artists “we learn White’s homosexual leanings, addressed overtly in his writings, are a possible cause. White would go on to build the Maverick into a thriving community with makeshift studios, a printing press, and a steady output of publications devoted to literature and the visual arts, most notably The Wild Hawk and The Plowshare. Hervey White even while espousing socialism lived as an anarchist, living according to his principles and never sold out to the bankers, the elite, the bourgeoise, to pretense, societies expectations of what a person should be. He expressed his love for men. Leaving us to wonder who these men were, these lovers of his. We look over the photo’s of the men involved with the Maverick community and wonder which ones. I suppose we could guess and our gaydar leads us to some of them. Where they only experimenting with the leader, the catch, the cool, were they true lovers or just a one-sided sexual encounter and then they ran back to their wives?

In The Land of Tomorrow Hervey wrote …”Here I sit on this lofty hill beside a ruin of which all archeologists have read, and I am thinking of Marselino, and how beautiful he is, and how he is going tomorrow and I will never look far back into those deep dark liquid love wells more. How surprised I was yesterday to see the difference in the color of our hands when clasped; his, so dark, almost as dark as a negro’s yet having nothing of the smoky greasy black, but a clear bronze.

Both the ruins and the view from this mountain top are grand, but I am tired now and heartsick. Still I will remember all as long as I live. If I forget the heart sickness no matter…I went to the river with them [the other Mexican hands] and as were riding together, he told me again how often he would think of me, he and Catalina [“his intended”] together, and how he would write, and he would be very angry if I did not send him a photograph for I was his dearest friend and then slowly:

‘I care a great deal for you.’

And when I replied that I liked him better than all the others he said simply: ‘I know.’

I could look at him then, and I saw the lines around the beautiful mouth were quivering and drawing, and his throat was writhing. He turned toward me quickly and his eyes met mine. Ah, the shining of those eyes! He smiled; and I saw in every feature that he was saying, “It is hard to bear, but we are strong.”

He was gay when we parted; but the soft tender light was shining in his eyes. As he pulled his horse about and took off his hat waving a last laughing lingering good bye, he made the most beautiful picture I have ever seen.”

The Land of Tomorrow created a stir for it announced White’s homosexuality.

Hervey White as Pan Maverick Festival

The Maverick Festivals began in 1915 as a means to raise money to dig a well for the Maverick community. The festival was conceived as a bohemian carnival filled with communal spirit to be held during the afternoon and evening of the August full moon. A theatrical spectacle began after dark with performances by artists, musicians and local people followed by a costume ball. Attendance at the festival grew and grew and became more and more difficult to control and by 1929 it was reported that over 6,000 people were in attendance. In 1931 White suspended the festival. While living on the Maverick Lucille Blanch told me of the wonderful parties that were held back “when I was young.” This is a picture of Lucille from a festival in 1922. (more…)

How we wish that they would realize this and stop with their attacks on the LGBT and Q community.

Image may contain: text

On Saturday the 26th the anti-choice organization “Caring Families” is holding their “Abundant Hope” fundraiser at UConn with Care Net President/CEO Roland Warren. Funds raised will go to expand fake pregnancy centers (aka CPCs) & will support facilities that prey on vulnerable people seeking comprehensive reproductive health options. Additionally, due to changes at the federal level Planned Parenthood is currently being denied Title X funding while simultaneously the same funding is now available to these anti-abortion organizations.

Help us raise public awareness about this outrage – join us outside the Rome Ballroom at the UConn Stores campus at 4:00 pm on Saturday the 26th & stand in solidarity for the reproductive rights of all people!