Archive for the ‘For your information’ Category

Before moving to Hartford Ct. I lived in the woods of The Maverick, nine miles outside and over the mountain from Woodstock NY. (1) I lived in what I called an elegant shack the last place going up the mountain. The only modern convenience that I had was electricity. Very rustic living to say the least. It took me one time, one winter morning to understand why the outhouse seat was not attached after what seemed like leaving have the skin on my ass behind on the cold seat. The toilet seat then took up residence behind the woodstove where I cooked, and melted snow to take a bath. Clean water for drinking and cooking was courtesy of the artist I worked for in the summer and in the winter from a woman I did odd jobs for including babysitting her two year old. She was an herbalist and from her I learned about the wild herbs and their healing powers. We collected in the summer, dried the herbs in the old studio at the back of my shack. Screens of Red Clover blossoms, Queen Anne’s Lace seeds, Plantain, tied together in bunches, Yarrow, Tansy, Peppermint, Nettles, Comfrey from the garden. Susan and I would go on nature walks up the mountain and over following old trails. An old farm was our destination long since abandoned where fields of Dandelion awaited us and many of the herbs that Susan used grew in the area. In the fall I picked apples from the abandoned orchard and made applesauce.

During my years on the Maverick I heard many stories about Hervey White and the “good old days” of the artists that gathered there, the festivals, the free love, the feeling of living freely from the powers that tried to tame the creative spirit on the other side of the mountain and in America. Hervey White intrigued me as a revolutionary Socialist, artist, free thinking creative person. Lucille Blanch an artist who came to the Maverick as a young artist and who was still going strong painting daily live in a little white house with a “host of daffodils” growing all along her stonewalls and around her yard. “Just dig up the bulb and throw it, it will come up again,” was her direction in thinning out the plants. I worked for her doing odd jobs and helping out where I could.  But in all my talks with quite a number of folks who lived on the Maverick or who had been living in Woodstock for years no one ever mentioned that Hervey White was a Bisexual man. At the time when he was alive it was a “open secret” or so some say.

Hervey White

Hervey White

“I will do what I like and go where I like without money, paying for my living as I go. Good advice has never driven it out of me.”

So begins our story of a man named Hervey White. A socialist, utopian thinker, Bisexual/Gay man, poet, writer, publisher, builder and philosopher on art and what it could be. White along with  Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead whom he had met at Jane Adams Hull House in Chicago, founded the Brydcliff Art Colony in Woodstock ( 2 ) and after awhile White grew tired of the bourgeois notions of art and life, that was dictated by Whitehead saying of him, “He would only employ people he could dictate to,” White wrote later, “and no self-respecting artist would ever stand for his dictation.”  bought a farm in West Hurley and so began the Maverick art colony. A running joke among some old timers I met in the Maverick was that Hervy White came to this side of the mountain because all the water ran down the other side and he thought that at Byrdcliff people took far too many baths. We read this about Hervey White: In 1905, White purchased a farm just outside Woodstock with Fritz van der Loo and Carl Eric Lindin, intended as a rustic haven for the three friends and their families. It quickly transformed into an intellectual meeting place and was named the Maverick; artists, writers, and musicians took up residence in minimalistic houses, usually little more than shacks, built on the property. White’s short-lived marriage to Byrdcliffe printmaker Vivian Bevans ended in 1908. According to Tom Wolff writing Hervey White”s Maverick Community and Its Artists “we learn White’s homosexual leanings, addressed overtly in his writings, are a possible cause. White would go on to build the Maverick into a thriving community with makeshift studios, a printing press, and a steady output of publications devoted to literature and the visual arts, most notably The Wild Hawk and The Plowshare. Hervey White even while espousing socialism lived as an anarchist, living according to his principles and never sold out to the bankers, the elite, the bourgeoise, to pretense, societies expectations of what a person should be. He expressed his love for men. Leaving us to wonder who these men were, these lovers of his. We look over the photo’s of the men involved with the Maverick community and wonder which ones. I suppose we could guess and our gaydar leads us to some of them. Where they only experimenting with the leader, the catch, the cool, were they true lovers or just a one-sided sexual encounter and then they ran back to their wives?

In The Land of Tomorrow Hervey wrote …”Here I sit on this lofty hill beside a ruin of which all archeologists have read, and I am thinking of Marselino, and how beautiful he is, and how he is going tomorrow and I will never look far back into those deep dark liquid love wells more. How surprised I was yesterday to see the difference in the color of our hands when clasped; his, so dark, almost as dark as a negro’s yet having nothing of the smoky greasy black, but a clear bronze.

Both the ruins and the view from this mountain top are grand, but I am tired now and heartsick. Still I will remember all as long as I live. If I forget the heart sickness no matter…I went to the river with them [the other Mexican hands] and as were riding together, he told me again how often he would think of me, he and Catalina [“his intended”] together, and how he would write, and he would be very angry if I did not send him a photograph for I was his dearest friend and then slowly:

‘I care a great deal for you.’

And when I replied that I liked him better than all the others he said simply: ‘I know.’

I could look at him then, and I saw the lines around the beautiful mouth were quivering and drawing, and his throat was writhing. He turned toward me quickly and his eyes met mine. Ah, the shining of those eyes! He smiled; and I saw in every feature that he was saying, “It is hard to bear, but we are strong.”

He was gay when we parted; but the soft tender light was shining in his eyes. As he pulled his horse about and took off his hat waving a last laughing lingering good bye, he made the most beautiful picture I have ever seen.”

The Land of Tomorrow created a stir for it announced White’s homosexuality.

Hervey White as Pan Maverick Festival

The Maverick Festivals began in 1915 as a means to raise money to dig a well for the Maverick community. The festival was conceived as a bohemian carnival filled with communal spirit to be held during the afternoon and evening of the August full moon. A theatrical spectacle began after dark with performances by artists, musicians and local people followed by a costume ball. Attendance at the festival grew and grew and became more and more difficult to control and by 1929 it was reported that over 6,000 people were in attendance. In 1931 White suspended the festival. While living on the Maverick Lucille Blanch told me of the wonderful parties that were held back “when I was young.” This is a picture of Lucille from a festival in 1922. (more…)

How we wish that they would realize this and stop with their attacks on the LGBT and Q community.

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On Saturday the 26th the anti-choice organization “Caring Families” is holding their “Abundant Hope” fundraiser at UConn with Care Net President/CEO Roland Warren. Funds raised will go to expand fake pregnancy centers (aka CPCs) & will support facilities that prey on vulnerable people seeking comprehensive reproductive health options. Additionally, due to changes at the federal level Planned Parenthood is currently being denied Title X funding while simultaneously the same funding is now available to these anti-abortion organizations.

Help us raise public awareness about this outrage – join us outside the Rome Ballroom at the UConn Stores campus at 4:00 pm on Saturday the 26th & stand in solidarity for the reproductive rights of all people!

From Fight Back News

45,000 Demand Queer Liberation in NYC
By Michela Martinazzi | June 30, 2019
Read more articles in LGBTQ

Members of the Committee to Stop FBI Repression in alternative Pride march. (FightBack!News/Staff)

New York, NY – On Sunday, June 30, 45,000 marched in the alternative Pride in protest of the corporatized World Pride event happening at the same time. The rally and march were organized by the Reclaim Pride Coalition, which formed as a response to last year’s Manhattan Pride celebration.

Every year, the city of Manhattan hosts one of the largest Pride parades in the world. As Manhattan is the birthplace of Pride, it’s fitting that the city should celebrate the monumental event of the Stonewall riots. However, as decades pass, Pride has turned from a militant march to a corporate parade. Last year was exceptionally glaring, as all the activists and organizers were placed at the end of the parade to let the cops, banks, electoral candidates, etc. lead the parade. A few groups attempted to resist and protest at the Pride parade last year, but it was clear that what was once a space for queer people to fight back had been taken over by corporate interests.

Organizers stated, “The 2019 Queer Liberation March is a people’s political march – no corporate floats, and no police in our march. This is a truly grassroots action that will mobilize the community to address the many social and political battles that continue to be fought locally, nationally and globally. We recognize the powerful legacy of the Stonewall Rebellion by highlighting the most marginalized members of our community.”

The march kicked off at Sheridan Square, opposite the Stonewall Inn, and thousands marched uptown to Bryant Park, where they picked up several thousands more. The route followed the original route marched by the Gay Liberation Front on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Riot.
Throughout the whole march, people chanted about everything from Palestine, Black Lives Matter, immigration, to anti-war and anti-cop. Whenever the marchers passed an anti-people establishment, such as Chik-Fil-A or a Trump building, they would rowdily chant at it.

The march was completely unpermitted with very few cops present. The march ended in Central Park on the Great Lawn. Everyone gathered to listen to speeches, music, and celebrate being queer and militant. The rally opened with living members of the Gay Liberation Front, many who had been at Stonewall on that fateful evening. Speeches talked about needing queer liberation alongside the liberation of Palestine, fighting for climate change, acknowledging that they were speaking on stolen land, and needing a revolution to fully be free. The messaging of the day was that we will not be free until all of us are.

Check out photo’s and more at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/reclaimpridenyc/

 

The Equity and Diversity Collection, LGBTQI+ Archives housed at Central Connecticut State University are in need of your help. In reviewing the contents of the collection, it has been noted that there is very little on the Bisexual movement here in Connecticut. Richard Nelson is spearheading the project of collecting any and all material concerning the Bisexual movement for justice in Connecticut. He and some of the folks who were involved in the movement are gathering archives and are looking for any objects, buttons, pamphlets, leaflets, writings or articles that you may have.

As we say in the collecting of ourstories, Out of the closets, Out of the attics and barns, Out of the basements and storage places. Researchers of ourstories, students who use the LGBTQI+ archives and others yet to come will thank you. It is important that we are a people tell all of our stories.

Anyone with anything to donate can contact Nelson at rvnted@gmail.com who will coordinate these archives and deliver the archives to CCSU. Please share this with anyone you know who may be interested in donating material.

Thank you.
For justice and Liberation

This excellent article is published in Freedom Socialist and reminds us Yes it is happening here again.

April 11, 2019
SOAPBOX
Return of the Red Scare

BERNADETTE LOGUE | APRIL-MAY 2019 FREEDOM SOCIALIST

“Here, in the United States, we are alarmed by new calls to adopt socialism in our country. America was founded on liberty and independence — not government coercion, domination and control.” This intoned by Donald Trump during his much-delayed State of the Union Address. Delayed because he forced a government shutdown to coerce Congress into paying for his Wall to deprive refugees from seeking … liberty and independence.
Alarmed? Trump and his fellow capitalists are in a downright tizzy, because interest in socialism is at an all-time high. And why wouldn’t it be? Desperate people are looking for rational answers. If we can put cars on Mars (R.I.P. Opportunity Rover), why can’t we dump fossil fuels and begin to deal with climate change? If Congress can give the Pentagon more money than requested, why can’t it fund universal healthcare? For working people trapped in immovable wages, students crushed by debt and seniors unable to afford medications like insulin, the capitalists offer no answers — only scapegoats and war.
Our rulers are terrified of socialism, because they think it means nationalizing private companies and banks and redistributing their vast wealth back to the people who created it, the workers. They are absolutely correct. That is what it means. As a revolutionary socialist, I’m all for sharing the wealth and abolishing poverty.
But the social democracies of Europe and the mixed economies of Latin America, like Venezuela, are not socialist countries, no matter how many times Fox News calls them communist or socialist. A country may have free healthcare and education. But wherever capitalists control the banks, trade, factories, utilities and agriculture, then sorry — that’s not socialism.
“I love war,” says Trump of the heel spurs. And why wouldn’t he? War is very profitable. Trump & Co. are not doing the fighting and dying. The war with Iraq was sold as a war to stop nonexistent weapons of mass destruction; it was really about stealing Iraq’s oil. Now we’re being sold a shiny, new war to “free the Venezuelan people from a socialist dictator.” But it’s really about stealing Venezuela’s oil and imposing more harsh sanctions. It’s called re-enforcing good old Yankee Imperialism in Latin America.
Trump has assembled a troika of fervent anti-communists to accomplish this — John Bolton, Elliot Abrams and Mike Pompeo. Bolton, national security adviser, also loves war. He and the president have that to share as they decide which countries to sanction, bomb or invade. Secretary of State Pompeo’s ultra-hawk positions fit perfectly with old cold-war politics. He’s for expanding Guantanamo Bay prison, defends CIA’s torture interrogations, focuses on “radical Islamic terrorism,” and applauds spying on people by Google and Facebook.
In a truly twisted move, even for this White House, Elliot Abrams was appointed to head up the ‘humanitarian aid’ for Venezuela. At a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing, he refused to answer Rep. Ilhan Omar’s question, “Yes or no, would you support an armed faction within Venezuela that engages in war crimes, crimes against humanity, or genocide if you believed they were serving U.S. interests, as you did in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala?” (more…)

March 12, 2019
Oppressions: the capitalist connection and the socialist solution
FEBRUARY-MARCH 2019 FREEDOM SOCIALIST

FSP contingent at Washington D.C. Women’s March in protest of 2017 inauguration of Donald Trump. PHOTO: FSP

The following excerpts are from a 1989 keynote speech by Clara Fraser to a conference called “Parallels and Intersections: Racism and Other Forms of Oppression.” What is the relationship between the oppression of different groups of people — and what are the implications for social change? These are the issues Fraser and the conference were addressing, and it’s one that has stalked movements for equality and liberation from their beginnings.

In the 1960s, Fraser and the organizations she co-founded, the Freedom Socialist Party and Radical Women, answered these questions with multi-issue revolutionary socialist feminism. The excerpts below capture the essence of these politics and their relevance to debates about intersectionality and identity politics today. The full speech can be read at marxists.org or in Fraser’s fierce and funny collection of essays and speeches called Revolution, She Wrote, available at RedLetterPress.org.

Chains forged by history

All the many brands of oppression — racism, sexism, heterosexism, ageism, classism — are historical; they have not been always with us. It was not ever thus. And it’s not going to be this way, come the revolution!
Human nature, by itself, is fine. If you’ve raised children, you know babies don’t come into the world nasty and exploitative — they’re nice people! They want support and help and solidarity. And they give love and gratitude. They’re cheerful; they like life. It’s what happens to them as they grow up that turns them into the kind of people you hate to meet. So the problem doesn’t start with human nature but with historical categories.

Oppressions grew. They developed — not out of somebody’s evil mind, but out of material reality. Given certain economic conditions, levels of technology, and the particular development of the forces of production, assorted varieties of subjugation had to happen. When production of “commodities” — goods for sale — became widespread, private ownership arose and with it came new family structures and relations among people. Classes emerged. And to entrench these new classes, new forms of rule developed. The state was born; laws came on the scene. The culture changed.
We live in an epoch in which there coexists class oppression, racism and sexism, heterosexism, ageism, ableism, anti-Semitism, et cetera, et cetera. There’s a name for this kind of society and it’s called capitalism. In its most developed expansionist form, it’s known as imperialism. (more…)