Archive for the ‘PRIDE’ Category

We wish to extend our New Years Greetings to all of our readers, friends and foes. furbirdsqueerly in this incarnation will continue into another year. When we take a look at our readership from all over the world we say, yeah we had better. It always amazes us when we check out the stats at the end of the year to see folks from all sorts of places who came for a visit. We have had people from Zimbabwe, New Caledonia, Uruguay, Vietnam, South Africa, Russia , France, Norway, Japan, Finland, South Korea, Singapore, French Guiana, Chile, Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Turkey, Norway, Philippians, Puerto Rico, United Kingdom, Bolivia, France, Pakistan, Mexico, Cambodia, many more, and of course the United States. We have had people from every continent except Greenland and mainland China. Here is a map from our stats.

So we say to ourselves, what else should we be doing. If someone from Cambodia visits once how can we get that person to come back again? How can we get people from Sweden to come on board? punkpink will be doing a run down of our stats to see what folks who came for a visit looked at. We want that international appeal as well as the next gal.

One thing we like to do at the end of the year is mention furbirdsqueerly’s greatest hits. What type of essays and article drew people to our site during the last year. This is not to say that we will monkey these posts just to keep the momentum going.

So here goes just a few our greatest hits for 2017!

Coming in at number one is an essay that we wrote back in 2008 when we worked with the group Queers Without Borders. It was in response to a local gay magazine The Metroline who wrote that there were no drag queens at Stonewall. (contrary to what everyone else who was there, (he was not) said about that night. The piece “No Drag Queens At Stonewall You Say, We Say Take A Flying Fuck was republished in 2011 on furbirdsqueerly when once again this same question reared its ugly head. This essay continues  to get hits and has links to the Stonewall Veterans Site.

Of course we noticed when we go local folks from this area come over to see what the fuss is about. (yes we love to cause a fuss, upset apple-carts and ruffle the feathers of the enlightened class) One piece a tribute to an artist who we think is tremendous, makes art, no questions asked is the artist Marc Burns. We wrote the essay Marc Burns At Art Space, A Wonderful Art Experience For All Of Us was a review of the artist’s show at a local gallery. Many people noted that our review was the better of the few but most of the people where enamored over a review which to us was flat and dry but was published by a well know critic on a well known web site. Oh well what can we say. Some have soul, some do not, some are afraid to say and we do not. I suppose though in the long run to the top I would rather a review by an art site rather than a little anarchist communist blog sitting in Hartford Ct.

front banner of jeri and us.

Our essays on LGBTQ Pride always get quite a bit attention we notice that folks in Europe really dig reading them. This is a post of 14 essays written over the years. The above photo’s are some of the members of Queers Without Borders attending PRIDE in NYC.

Our latest work J. P. Morgan and the celebrating of misdeeds is gaining readers everyday.  What we enjoy about this one is that folks from not only here but around the world are reading this essay. The lesson that rang true through-out the essay was the words of Anarchist Leon Czolgosz, “Don’t give up the fight, Don’t dare surrender! No War But Class War. No War But Class War!”

Close to home but with resounding all over the country was our essay, Rip It Down Or Let It Stand, an essay on the removal of the Colt Memorial in a local park. In future essays we will be exploring other statues, and memorials that we feel should be removed.  One such statue is a new one of the Rev. Samuel Stone, a rev. from the late 1600’s who tortured and persecuted women who were declared to be witches.

Image result for samuel stone hartford ct.

Our essay Center Church: Is An Apology In Order From The Church For The Persecution of Women continues to gather readers.

Image result for equality march hartford ct.

Photo-button worn by furbirdsqueerly R. Nelson, taken by Kerri of Real Hartford.

One essay, a very important one, Greetings To All How Gather Here Today: A Leaflet From Furbirdsqueerly to The LGBTQ Community and Allies. A rallying call against single issue struggle the essay began this way:

“Today as concerned queers we gather with others who oppose the regime in Washington DC. We gather to raise our concerns not only to this nation but to our community the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and allied. Many years ago, when our movement was young we learned that as LGBTQ folks we were here, there and everywhere. We learned that as Queers in the Gay Liberation Front we could not survive unless we formed a united front with others who at that time were under attack. We fully understood that we must not only seek the liberation of our people but of all people and join with the movements around the world in solidarity and in fighting for liberation. Later we learned from the great Black, poet, author, philosopher, teacher Audre Lorde when she said, “There is no such thing as a single issue, as we do not lead a single-issue life.”

Of course many folks visit our main page and archives. (probably wondering what is a furbird anyway.)  So we will be doing more one page articles, photos and other quick readings. The above articles are just a few of our hits from the past year. We will continue to work against this unjust system doing what we can and supporting those who do. So from all of us at furbirdsqueerly    HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

Advertisements

The New Haven Pride Center Presents:

FEMME IN PUBLIC: a performance by Alok Vaid-Menon

What feminine part of yourself did you have to destroy in order to survive in this world? At what point does femininity become synonymous with apology? Who hurt the people who hurt you? Alok is trying to figure it out.

Join for an evening of poetry, comedy, and performance art.

Monday, November 13, 2017
Performances at 7:00p and 9:00p
Doors open 30 minutes before performances.
General Admission $25 / Center Members $20 / Students $15

Lyric Hall Theater
827 Whalley Ave, New Haven

About the Artist
Alok Vaid-Menon (they/them/their) is a gender non-conforming performance artist, writer, educator, and entertainer. Their eclectic sense of style, political comedy, and poetic challenge to the gender binary have been internationally renowned. Alok was recently the youngest recipient of the prestigious Live Works Performance Act Award granted to ten performance artists across the world. They have been featured on HBO, MTV, The Guardian, National Geographic, The New York Times, and The New Yorker and have presented their work at 300 venues in more than 30 countries.

See facebook page for more details HERE.

If you can and if you haven’t or if you have ever or never yet seen a performance by Alok get your tickets and go. High Queer Art, some of the best.

Coming Out Day!!

Posted: October 11, 2017 in for your reflection, PRIDE

Guess I have been out for so long I almost forgot about National Coming Out Day. Greetings to all who are out and come out today. A very big thank you to all of our LGBTQ groups that help guide the way for our young to make the leap OUT! In Hartford we thank the people at True Colors who have worked with our youth since 1992. Robin Mc Halen, Kamora Herrington and others I thank you for your dedication and your guidance all of these years bringing the next generations out of that terrible place of aloneness. One thing we know for certain is that folks will still have to come out both young and old so organizations that help in this process are some of the most important and revolutionary. These times demand that we be out, open and in the faces of those who would rather see us dead than living, breathing and happy.

My coming out story is so different and I wish to share it here. I probably have over the years mentioned it to others. There I was 18 years old back in 1966 standing in my underwear with lots of other guys at the New Haven Induction Center. The war in Vietnam was on and I had already been a part of the protests against it. The big question came up. Are you a homosexual? Lots of things go through ones head when asked that big question. Exp. back then, before Stonewall, before we all knew so much. I could lie like the next guy or take a cue from Randy Newman, (remember that singer, who stood next to me) and said yes. Let’s be honest here. You know Uncle Sam doesn’t like fags and this fag doesn’t like Uncle Sam. I think we called him Scam back then. But you know once you get that 4F it will follow you up until the day you die. They will ask you each time when you apply for a job, WHY? If you say, that’s none of your business, it would put you out of business, being honest back then would not be the best route to take. So what is a young sissy to do? Are you a real homo, or a practicing one? Honey I felt like saying, I don’t need any practice, I certainly know what I am doing and learning all I can. Do you have sex all the time with men? Yes I do. All the time and any time I can find someone I will have sex. I was sent to a doctor who felt my balls and rubbed my dick, I guess trying to get me hard as proof that a man could turn me on. You know young man there are a lot of boys who claim to be a homosexual that aren’t they are just trying to get out of being drafted. Maybe its a passing phase?  Well not me sir, yes I could be polite when I needed to be, no sir not me. I am a homosexual.

So that is the first time that I came out. After that all hell broke loose as to why I didn’t get drafted along with all of the other boys. Why wasn’t I going to kill the commies way over there in Vietnam. Didn’t I think it was my duty, a war was raging and you should be a part of it. Make me proud son, please make me proud. Well it was over at home as quick as I could finish opening my mouth. Out I was fleeing only with the shirt on my back and a comb in my pocket sticking out my thumb headed to the streets of NYC. Coming out back then was just as bad for some of us as it is still today. One thing is for certain, we had very little support back then. But you know that was only the first time in this coming out business. Coming out is over and over again through out ones life but now old me at 70 doesn’t really give a fuck what anyone thinks. I gave up that straight jacket a long time ago. No one is going to force me between the lines or fill in my blanks according to them or ever force me to be quiet.

We read many years ago that our LGBTQ stories had been suppressed, ignored, omitted, denied and erased. That straights wanting to grab the truth from us rewrote ourstories to suit their agenda and even many times the LGBT person chose the straight jacket over freedom and liberation. Over the last 50+ years our LGBTQ scholars, artists, our story makers have unlocked, kicked down and opened the many locked and closed doors that stood in the way of our people. We here at Furbirdsqueerly rejoice that they have given back to us that which was taken away that which was in the dark, that which was hidden between the lines. That place of not knowing was just another form of oppression keeping us all in down. As Socialist Feminist Nelly Wong said, “Exploring ideas and finding long hidden history (ourstories) is a form of finding voice.” If we ever wish to be truly liberated we must come from a place of a deep understanding of our people’s stories. We are fortunate to be living in these times when we can stand up out and proud where we can find our voice and be silent no more. Yes we can and must talk back to the oppressor. Our powerful movement for justice, freedom and liberation has come a long way since the days of Coopers Doughnuts, Compton’s Cafeteria and the Stonewall Inn but many of us realize that there is much more to do. We are being attacked daily by the present administration in Washington DC and all over the country we see our rights slowly eroding. The fascist right is on the rise and we are a targeted group. We must talk back now more than ever and we must begin to realize that reform which the LGBT movement has been so good at is a dismal failure. If we do not unite with others who are oppressed and fight back against this current threat then we shall go down in which ever way the right choses. Make no mistake about it we will go down.

Many times over the years we have been at the center of controversy when we have tried hard to get our LGBT sisters and brothers to understand that single issue fight is a dead end. So many times with the small victories that have been ours we think, “The battle has been won.” Then years later we see that our hard fought for rights are under attack and we are in the position to lose ground. Again let us remember that “the single issue is a dead end issue. It is an inevitable violation of revolutionary clarity, integrity and responsibility yet it persists because the ruling class confers respectability upon it.” …Clara Frazer. Ms. Frazer agrees that even if we win reforms on single issues like abortion rights, we wind up fighting to retain them year after year. Feminist Socialist Gloria Martin said, “We have to change the system, because as long as the system is the same, we’ll be fighting all our lives for the same thing…” This is our moto and this is our hope and this is what we work for.

ALL POWER TO A UNITED FRONT!! STAND AGAINST THE NEO NAZIS!! STAND AGAINST THE RIGHT!! STAND AGAINST CAPTIALISM!!

Note: Many articles are found over in our pages section that trace ourstories and events and struggles that we at Furbirdsqueerly has been involved in. Check them out during this LGBTQ Ourstory month. 

We remember this quite well. We stood in support of the Panthers in New Haven along with the Gay Liberation Front of NYC. We know that the government will use any trick in the book to destroy the revolutionary liberation movements and we must stand ready to fight them off. Today the FBI is doing the same with the Black Lives Matter movement and Queers of all colors must stand in support of BLM.

Revolutionary LGBT history: The Black Panthers supported gay rights.

By Serena Freewomyn, as published on the Bilerico Report.

Many people like to criticize the Black Panthers by saying that they were racist, sexist, and/or homophobic, but this is just an attempt to delegitimize one of the most revolutionary organizations this country has ever known. White people especially hold onto these claims and ignore the many social programs that the Panthers provided: health care, free breakfasts for kids, clothing distributions, police patrols . . . the list goes on. This post is not going to be a summary of all the things that the Panthers did for their community. This post is meant as a response to those who would slander the Black Panthers with charges of homophobia and sexism.

In his book We Want Freedom: A Life in the Black Panther Party, Mumia Abu-Jamal deals specifically with the issue of sexism within The Black Panther Party.
The great African American educator and civil rights leader Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955), a major force in the Black women’s club movement in the 1920’s and 30’s, called on women to “go to the front and take our rightful place; fight our battles and claim our victories.” Women tried to do this in the heyday of the Black Liberation movement, as well as during the Civil Rights movement, with varying degrees of success. In these movements, women generally were relegated to subordinate roles and were virtually invisible within the hierarchy of the organizations, even though they provided the bulk of memberships and labor. . . .

It is with a focus on these macho and misogynist attitudes that much of the popular press has examined the role of Black women in the Black Panther Party. in The Shadow of the Panther, Hugh Pearson, who had no discernable background in the Black Liberation movement, and therefore no firsthand knowledge of what he wrote, damned the Black Panther Party’s “routine” mistreatment of women as both wide-ranging and “flagrant.” Peterson relied on three BPP insiders, “those who would never forgive Huey for what he did to the party,” and on “nonblacks who had been affiliated with Newton and the party,” whom he found to be the “easiest” sources for him to interview. It is not surprising that he comes to flawed conclusions upon these limited and biased sources. . . .
While it may be proper to be sharply critical of the Black Liberation movement generally, it is also proper to give credit where credit is due. For the undeniable truth is that the Black Panther Party, for ideological reasons and for reasons of sheer survival, gave the women of the BPP far more opportunities to lead and to influence the organization than any of its contemporaries, in white or Black radical formations. . . .

And point seven of the BPP 8 Points of Attention in the Party’s rules states, “Do not take liberties with women,” showing an awareness that sexual misconduct must be confronted within the Party. Kathleen Cleaver writes, “In 1970 the Black Panther Party took a formal position on the liberation of women. Did the U.S. Congress make any statement on the liberation of women? . . . Did the Oakland police issue a position against gender discrimination?” (p. 159-162) (more…)

Yes we are old fashion we refuse to use (his)-story month. Its all of ours not just his so we use ourstory. Let’s begin with the great sign.

and may we add fuck you if you don’t like it.

Check out this article published on Socialist Action site and written by Jericho Jones. It expresses much of what we are feeling about PRIDE now-a-days. Will the LGBT community ever give up their bourgeois leanings and once again as in years past join with our revolutionary queers and comrades? We do not seem to think that they will. Please before anyone says, well furbird you must go to PRIDE and pound away, block the route, scream and yell, educate. Well be goodness sakes, we have been trying that since back in the day. Been there done that. We know the day will come when the LGBT community sees the light, (hopefully) and understands. Hopefully but brothers, sisters, comrades we at our age are not going to hold our breath.

PRIDE 2017 (Photo from the Article)

 

Jericho Jones begins the excellent article this way:

“This time of year we have reason to look with rejoicing at Gay Pride celebrations around the world. Their number, persistence, and exuberance were unimaginable to this lonely queer kid growing up in the 1970s. To think there was any place you could be openly, even flagrantly gay was like oxygen. Today, hundreds of pride celebrations offer queer kids almost anywhere the hope of finding a place of relative freedom.

Yet in spite of our advances, we still live under the threat of violence driven by hate. Not two weeks ago, we marked the first anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shooting, the deadliest mass shooting by one person in U.S. history. Barely a week seems to pass between reports of vicious and deadly attacks on transsexual women. Stonewall may have been nearly 50 years ago, but we are still awash in hate.

Experience shows that facts and argument don’t counter hate, but knowing a queer person and feeling empathy can. Decades of painful, frequently dangerous coming out have given many of us a world where queer people can hope to find a place to live and prosper. The importance of showing pride to the world hasn’t become any less urgent.

Even so, Gay Pride is the season of ambivalence for me. Early on, it represented a radical demonstration that queer people not only refuse to be silent but insist on making their presence undeniable. In the years since, it has become something distinctly different. What once celebrated the freewheeling sense of possibility at the heart of queer life has become an opportunity for corporate marketing and for solidarity among queers who happen to live and look like the majority.”

To read the rest of the article go to HERE:

Jericho ends this way:

“These queer forbearers showed us that change does not come from appealing to wealth and power, but from standing against them without apology. The struggles for Black civil rights and the history of the labor movement showed us the same. That Pride would leave trans people and queer people of color behind is unconscionable. Red Rose Socialists stands—always—with the marginalized, the powerless, and the voiceless in their struggles.”