Archive for the ‘PRIDE’ Category

 

On 24 December 1920, biracial lesbian and gay rights icon Stormé DeLarverie was born in New Orleans. Her mother was African American and her father was a white man.  She is credited by many as sparking the Stonewall riots, as according to some eyewitnesses and her own account she was the “New York butch” who was arrested and attacked by police. Bleeding from a head wound, she began to fight back and called to the crowd “Why don’t you guys do something?” The famous words that we have heard that were spoken about the Stonewall Rebellion came from Storme’ when she said, “The cop hit me so I hit him back!” Years of oppression began to fall away with that action, those words. When she was thrown into a police van the crowd erupted and the Stonewall rebellion began. As well is working as an MC, bouncer and bodyguard, she carried a gun and patrolled the streets of the Village, protecting other lesbians from street harassment or assault, and also raised money for survivors of domestic violence.

She is remembered as a gay civil rights icon and entertainer, who performed and hosted at the Apollo Theater and Radio City Music Hall. She worked for much of her life as an MC, singer, bouncer, bodyguard and volunteer street patrol worker, the “guardian of lesbians in the Village.” From 1955 to 1969 DeLarverie toured the black theater circuit as the MC (and only drag king) of the Jewel Box Revue, North America’s first racially integrated drag revue. The revue regularly played the Apollo Theater in Harlem, as well as to mixed-race audiences.

She worked at the Cubby Hole and Fat Cat’s, two popular lesbian bars in the West Village. Storme was often working the door at both clubs as a bouncer.

About Stonewall Stormie’ had this to say: “It was a rebellion, it was an uprising, it was a civil rights disobedience — it wasn’t no damn riot”, she declared at a public and videographed SVA-sponsored “Stonewall Symposium”, referring to the historic 1969 Stonewall Rebellion. Stormé was a part of the uprising on the very first night, Friday, June 27th. “The cops were parading patrons out of the front door of The Stonewall at about two o’ clock in the morning. I saw this one boy being taken out by three cops, only one in uniform. Three to one! I told my pals, ‘I know him! That’s Williamson, my friend Sonia Jane’s friend.’ Williamson briefly broke loose but they grabbed the back of his jacket and pulled him right down on the cement street. One of them did a drop kick on him. Another cop senselessly hit him from the back. Right after that, a cop said to me: ‘Move faggot’, thinking that I was a Gay guy. I said, ‘I will not! And, don’t you dare touch me.” With that, the cop shoved me and I instinctively punched him right in his face. He bled! He was then dropping to the ground — not me!”

Storme’ DeLarverie died in her sleep at 93 on May 24, 2014.

Now that the climate in amerikkka is once again turning against our people we must remember our people who stood up, who never apologized for who they were and who when they had to fought back.

So in honor of this great freedom fighter this Lesbian, Trans liberation warrior let’s have a little fun. We can be sure that Storme’ would love this tribute and it comes from our full heart to you. We can just see her clicking her fingers along to the song. Happy Birthday Storme’ and a big THANK YOU!!!

Hello to all

Important things have been happening in the background and a rumbling is heard. I am very proud to announce that Jerimarie Liesegang has finished her video documentary on Sylvia Rivera. The documentary Sylvia Rivera Was More Than Stonewall is one of the few possibly the only one that looks at the complete life of this Revolutionary Transgender Warrior. Twenty years ago I was honored to introduce Sylvia at the Ct. Stonewall Congress and to this day hold her dear in my heart. What fun myself, Regina Dyton, Tim, Paul and a few others had visiting with Sylvia and her family outside as we smoked and laughed and then laughed again. Sylvia indeed as a revolutionary Trans leader whose words ring true today. Sylvia who believed in a multi issue revolutionary movement where all of us were and are included. Sylvia who fought hard for her people in the Trans community and was thrown off the bus, and under the bus so many times.

We need more Sylvia’s in our movement today. If there were we all know the one issue or issues only of a LGBT nature would not exist. We would understand and see the connections with all other communities and not only act when it involves a LGBT person. We would understand fully that when the bombs drop on the people of Palestine it is our issue. We would know that when Democrat or Republican deports immigrants it is our issue. We would fully understand that when people all across this country can not afford medication that is needed, or a home to live in it is our issue. We would fight back when the least among us are hurting and become one with all. This I believe is what Sylvia Rivera would do as she proved over and over again this is what must be done. This was the inspiration that pushed us towards a new day before a wrong road was taken so many years ago. We must, let us repeat that we must move back to those days when we fully understood that we are here, there, and everywhere so there for all issues are our issues. It is the only way we will survive.

Anyway there I go again up on the soapbox but wanted to give just my little introduction to Jeri’s video.  Of course this type of work is best viewed on full screen for a full viewing pleasure. While you are over at the Ct. Trans Archive page check out all the work that Jeri has been doing lately as she posts and gets her archives in order to send down to CCSU.

My best to everyone
Richard Nelson

P.S A birdie told me a new Ct. movement documentary is now in the works. It’s good folks really good or so the birdie saw.

The documentary is found here:

Full Length (cradle to grave) documentary on Sylvia Rivera

Pride
film-Screening and video-conference discussion with Mike Jackson, co-founder of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners

Sunday, June 23
1:30pm
Carriage House Theater
360 Farmington Avenue
Hartford, CT 06105

In 1984 the Thatcher government sought to close coal pits as part of an offensive on trade-unions in the UK. Mine-workers responded with what turned out to be one of the largest and most intense strikes in British history. After a spontaneous fundraising effort for miners at the London Gay Pride Parade, two gay activists (Mark Ashton and Mike Jackson) formed Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners. The group grew to 11 chapters and raised over 20,000 pounds for the families of strikers (about 80,000 American dollars in 2018).

The solidarity forged in the strike and support campaign led to major turning points in the movement for gay rights. After the end of the strike, the miners’ union joined the Gay Pride March in 1985 and in the same year campaigned for the first resolution in the history of the labour party to support gay rights – and it passed.

Join us for a viewing of the widely acclaimed film, Pride which tells the story of this remarkable struggle. The film will be accompanied by remarks and discussion with Mike Jackson by video conference, co-founder of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners, and a major consultant for the film.

For more information:
Contact 860-662-6278
On Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1971561662971325/

This is the year folks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion. We will be publishing through-out the coming months articles, photos and what every else strikes our fancy about this one great moment in LGBTQ history.

Let us start with a statement that should be thought about and thought about again and again. How can we apply these words written so many years ago to what is happening today in amerikkka? We had better be fully aware that it can and is happening and do more and more about it.

So let’s go back to our brave radicals when they confronted the NACHO mainstream L & G movement with some sobering words of wisdom.

Trans Lifeline Benefit at Chez Est

Hosted by Mia E Z’Lay and Chez Est

Sunday November 25, 2018 4pm to 11pm

458 Wethersfield Ave. Hartford Ct.

There will be no entry fee! We will have a show every hour starting at 5pm. We have so many amazing entertainers who are donating their time and art. All money made from the shows will be donated to Trans Lifeline.
Mia E Z’Lay and Layne Alexander Gianakos will be running the event at Chez Est

If you are interested in donating and can not make it please message Mia or Layne. If you want to perform message us asap!

Please share with your friends and family!

Facebook Page HERE. 

This piece is again a collage of ideas put together in the service of the people. We would like to start this piece with two very important events that took place in our community in the past months. We stand with No Justice No Pride and Trans Queer Pueblo. The second part of this piece is dedicated to ourstories from history past.  This piece concerns police entrapment (yes baby it is still going on here today) in history and our people responds or not in fighting back or sitting back. Important fight back that continues today with groups such as No Justice No Pride and Trans Queer Pueblo. We stand with all of our people within the LGBTQ tribe who see the connection with the murder of Black Men and Women, with cops and ICE harassment of people and ourselves. We stand with all of our people who see the connections on why white middle class pride just doesn’t fit the bill anymore. We remember from ourstories this: In early 1952, leaders of the Mattachine became aware that the issue of entrapment of homosexuals by police in Los Angeles also affected Mexican Americans. In the latter regard the Mattachine was contacted by the local Civil Rights Congress (CRC), a Communist Party front group. The Mattachine also made an alliance with the Red-friendly Asociación Nacional México-Americana, which had its roots in organized labor but concerned itself with police brutality as well. ( 1 ) We realize that this is the only way to go. The only way to fight back.

News of Today

No Justice No Pride shows LGBT folks the way to go.

Here is a statement by No Justice No Pride about the Blue Lives Matter Flag flying at Nellies in Washington DC.

Nellie’s Sports Bar is Cancelled.

In the wake of the murder of Stephon Clark and non indictment of the officers who killed Alton Sterling, they have the audacity to fly a flag that tells us they don’t value Black lives NOT TO MENTION NO JUSTICE FOR KAYLA MOORE, A BLACK TRANS WOMAN WHO WAS MURDERED BY BERKELEY POLICE in 2015. Judge Breyer last week ruled in favor of the City of Berkeley and dismissed the case brought by the family of Kayla Moore. The judge thinks that we don’t have enough evidence to prove that the police “mistook her disability for a crime”. It was already so disgraceful that the judge threw out the claims of excessive force and wrongful arrest back in October of 2017. This most recent discarding of the humanity of people with disabilities is also what we are up against. Maybe this is actually better because now we can go back to the arguments about all three of the main claims and widen this movement back up again.

This is anti blackness.
#BoycottNellies
#NeverNelliesx

blue flag at nellies

Nellie’s a gay bar in Washington, D.C., was forced to apologize Saturday for hanging up a “Blue Lives Matter” flag outside its establishment after a group of gay police officers held a meeting there. The blue flag angered some people who claimed it was offensive to the Black Lives Matter movement and represented “anti blackness.”
Representatives of police departments across the country and an organization that manufactures and distributes the flag have said repeatedly that the flag was never intended to be used as a symbol of discrimination or racial injustice.
“The thin blue line stands for the sacrifice law enforcement officers of this nation make each day,” USA Today quoted Thin Blue Line, an organization that distributes the flags “We reject in the strongest possible terms any association of our flag with racism, hatred, and bigotry,” the organization told USA Today. “To use it in this way tarnishes what it and our nation believe in.”

Drew Ambrogi an organizer of No Justice, No Pride one of the groups behind the gay pride protests of the past few years told the Washington Blade the group learned about the flag being displayed at Nellie’s when one of its members walked past the bar last Friday and saw it hanging from a flag pole.

“We saw it as an issue and we posted about it pretty quickly,” Ambrogi said

“We now understand that flying this flag — at this point in time, in particular — was at best tone deaf, and at worst offensive. We sincerely apologize to our customers and our neighbors for this egregious mistake, and want to assure you that this flag will never fly at Nellie’s again. What it represents to you is not what we want to represent, or what we want our bar to be,” the D.C. establishment said in a statement posted to Facebook Nellie’s said it would be sending a donation to No Justice No Pride.

As many have said and we are saying it again, One can not love the oppressed and the oppressor, it just can’t be done.

A wonderful page from Trans Queer Pueblo Zine 2018. To check it out and other great information on what this upfront, out front and great group is going go to HERE.

Trans Queer Pueblo Phoenix Arizona

After a year of trying to convince Phoenix Pride Board that trans, queer, and gender-non-conforming people of color deserve an LGBTQ Pride where we can be safe from the police and the corporations that fund our deportation, we are saying goodbye.

Join us in reclaiming Pride’s roots of protest and resistance. Join us for LGBTQ+ Justice Week in Phoenix, AZ.

A bit of ourstories from history past.

Gay Entrapment

Police entrapment of homosexual men and harassment of gay bars were widespread; during the 1950s, cities such as Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., police arrested 100 men a month on misdemeanor charges relating to homosexuality. This harassment was not just limited to the 1950s. This harassment continued throughout the following decades and continues today. One of my very close friends was arrested for a “lingering stare at an undercover cop who was beating his meat in a highway rest stop. “This was in 2001. In 2016 police in Toronto arrested 65 men in a out of the way park some for as little as gazing too long at the undercover agent who again had his dick out, stroking it and the one who was the “come and get it” man.

The Connexion a gay newsletter published in the early 1970s had this to say, “Hartford gays are experiencing a new low in cruising freedom these days, Ask anyone who normally cruises the infamous Asylum Hill and Garden Street area. The numbers of people who have been taken down to the precinct houses are already legion and the arrests and friskings continue to mount… One individual who lives in the neighborhood was arrested for loitering while… [going] to the store for milk.” ( 2 )

Here in Hartford men were arrested for cruising along the river banks back in the mid 1980’s. As recently as last year men were arrested for cruising in a off the way park in Manchester Ct. and this blog heard that the cops in a wealthy suburban town were keeping their eye out for any cruising in a local park. Arrests for cruising go way back in history. All over police are still raiding bath houses and arresting men there, arresting men in parks, in tearooms and other places men meet up with other men. The cops, society and many of their friends in both the L & G and straight communities have this to say, “You’re okay as long as you stay within the lines that we draw, as long as you are willing to wear our straight jackets and as long as you are willing to be “just like us.” If not we will arrest you or have you arrested and from then on your life will be miserable.”

Will you join us in this fight?

How to swell the ranks of a movement, just let the cops act the way they do and bam, folks will turn out, join up and fight back. Here is one example from our early history the entrapment of Dale Jennings, his arrest, trial and the break up of the Mattachine and the founding of ONE INC.

“Were all homosexuals and bisexuals to unite militantly, unjust laws and corruption would crumble in short order … Were heterosexuals to realize that these violations of our rights threaten them equally, a vast reform might even come within our lifetime”. …Dale Jennings

We do not see this ‘vast reform’ simply as rights within this system, such as marriage, the military issue but see the bigger picture of liberation. As we said in the early days we do not seek to transform this system but to topple it. (more…)