Archive for the ‘PRIDE’ Category

Check out this article published on Socialist Action site and written by Jericho Jones. It expresses much of what we are feeling about PRIDE now-a-days. Will the LGBT community ever give up their bourgeois leanings and once again as in years past join with our revolutionary queers and comrades? We do not seem to think that they will. Please before anyone says, well furbird you must go to PRIDE and pound away, block the route, scream and yell, educate. Well be goodness sakes, we have been trying that since back in the day. Been there done that. We know the day will come when the LGBT community sees the light, (hopefully) and understands. Hopefully but brothers, sisters, comrades we at our age are not going to hold our breath.

PRIDE 2017 (Photo from the Article)

 

Jericho Jones begins the excellent article this way:

“This time of year we have reason to look with rejoicing at Gay Pride celebrations around the world. Their number, persistence, and exuberance were unimaginable to this lonely queer kid growing up in the 1970s. To think there was any place you could be openly, even flagrantly gay was like oxygen. Today, hundreds of pride celebrations offer queer kids almost anywhere the hope of finding a place of relative freedom.

Yet in spite of our advances, we still live under the threat of violence driven by hate. Not two weeks ago, we marked the first anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shooting, the deadliest mass shooting by one person in U.S. history. Barely a week seems to pass between reports of vicious and deadly attacks on transsexual women. Stonewall may have been nearly 50 years ago, but we are still awash in hate.

Experience shows that facts and argument don’t counter hate, but knowing a queer person and feeling empathy can. Decades of painful, frequently dangerous coming out have given many of us a world where queer people can hope to find a place to live and prosper. The importance of showing pride to the world hasn’t become any less urgent.

Even so, Gay Pride is the season of ambivalence for me. Early on, it represented a radical demonstration that queer people not only refuse to be silent but insist on making their presence undeniable. In the years since, it has become something distinctly different. What once celebrated the freewheeling sense of possibility at the heart of queer life has become an opportunity for corporate marketing and for solidarity among queers who happen to live and look like the majority.”

To read the rest of the article go to HERE:

Jericho ends this way:

“These queer forbearers showed us that change does not come from appealing to wealth and power, but from standing against them without apology. The struggles for Black civil rights and the history of the labor movement showed us the same. That Pride would leave trans people and queer people of color behind is unconscionable. Red Rose Socialists stands—always—with the marginalized, the powerless, and the voiceless in their struggles.”

Furbirdsqueerly stands in full support of this letter and in full support of the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Not Like This — #NoPrideHere
By #BlackLivesMatter NYC

Let us start off by saying that we stand in full solidarity with our siblings of the Toronto Chapter of #BlackLivesMatter. We have been inspired by the strategic moves made by the TO team, including the chapters decision to not attend PRIDE this year in order to spotlight the reality of anti-blackness in all areas of society. PRIDE is shared on the same day in both Toronto and New York City. We like our Toronto comrades, write this public statement to PRIDE NYC organizers, the Gay Officers Action League-NY (GOAL-NY) and the NYPD in declaring the following:

  • the removal of uniformed police and PRIDE-detailed vehicles from the NYC Pride parade. As a human rights organization, GOAL-NY should be addressing the issues of local public safety issues within the NYPD Black and Brown communities across all precincts in NYC especially among those who identify as LGBTIQ, starting with supporting the Right to Know Act
  • a commitment to transform the culture and events of PRIDE to center the lives of of those most marginalized — queer and transgender Black communities.
  • the honoring of our ancestors and elders with true integrity of their radical existence. It was Marsha P. Johnson, a Black transwoman, who was one of the first to resist the attacks on Stonewall Inn by the NYPD. It was Miss Major, a Black transwoman, who continues to stand with the current queer and transgender organizers as we push back against a system that deems us disposable both in life and death.

As many people in NYC fawn over the NYPD’s participation in Pride events, we cannot forget the dangers that one of the biggest military forces poses to Black communities. In standing with BLM-Toronto, we must call to awareness the hyper-militarization of local police. Along with such awareness, we must stomach the death of Mx Bostick; a Black trans woman murdered here in NYC this past spring. We must acknowledge the daily taunting and threat to trans women of color as they ride the train. We must remember that Islan Nettles’ head was bashed into the sidewalk just outside of Precinct 147 in Harlem after a coward realized she was a trans woman.

We know that 92% of those arrested for fare beating are Black & Brown folks, and we have accounts of how trans women, who are among the most impoverished communities, are treated by the NYPD for something as simple as not having $2.75 for public transportation. This is what has led us to work with others in New York City in organizing our #SwipeitForward campaign. We connect the increase in violence against trans women of color to the deaths of Black immigrants like David Felix, murdered by an NYPD detective and his body not claimed for 21-days. We see all of those issues, happening here locally, as a reflection of the racist, transphobic, and homophobic rhetoric we have spewing from those as high up as the White House. (more…)

Celebrate the Victories and Fight Like Hell To Defend Them.

In from Radical Women and Freedom Socialist Party

 

When arch conservative Anita Bryant crusaded against gay rights in the 1970s, the queer community fought back. Not every battle was won, but the stage was set across the U.S. for increasing rights.

When Ronald Reagan maintained a deadly silence in the early 1980s as the AIDS/HIV crisis escalated, with his fascist-loving communications director, Pat Buchanan, calling AIDS “nature’s revenge on gay men,” the LGBTQ community Acted Up.

When white supremacists with an ugly homophobic, multi-issue agenda declared their intention to turn the Northwest into an Aryan Homeland, also in the Reagan/Bush years, leaders in the Seattle lesbian and gay community became key to the success of the United Front Against Fascism, alongside Black, feminist, socialist, and union activists. Together they mobilized a movement that met the skinheads and KKK wherever they gathered publicly.

Now the hard right is once again in the White House and on the streets of our country.

Time to make radical alliances with the right’s intended victims

Queer history is one of being in the forefront against the turn-back-the-clockers — in our own defense and in defense of every group they target. We have a heritage to flaunt and live up to!

As in the past, now is the time to make common cause with our natural allies — victims of police terror and racial bigotry, immigrants, Muslims, Jews, women who face the prospect of losing their reproductive rights, unions under attack by the “right to work” Freedom Foundation — in short, working people of many colors and descriptions. Fighting together and defending each other, we are strong; separated, we are easy prey for corporate CEOs and their stormtroopers whose final goal is to save the profit system by reducing the working class to zombie wage slaves.

Today the country needs an outpouring of many radical united fronts that live by the slogan “An injury to one is an injury to all!”

Total liberation, nothing less!

LGBTQ people have resisted oppression at least since the witch hunts of the 15th century. We are not about to have our lavender lives suffocated now! Everything won with blood, sweat and sacrifice over the past 50 years is on the line.

To keep advancing, we will stand up for ourselves and for the workers making unlivable wages and for the immigrants maligned, harassed and deported — who are also us! We will stand up for all our sister and brother “outsiders.” We will rely on our own ability, not politicians, to mobilize the forces to fight for justice and freedom for all. We will be a battalion in the army of the oppressed, confident in the knowledge that the future belongs to the multi-hued international working class. We will not be pushed back into the closet. Instead, we will finish the revolution for human liberation we started.

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SOLIDARITY Contingent in the Gay Pride Parade!

Meet at 11 AM, Sunday, June 25 in front of the Uptown Target  4466 N. Broadway (details below)

The election of Donald Trump has heralded a climate of open bigotry against immigrants, Muslims and other groups already facing discrimination in the United States.

Following on the heels of declining living standards during the Obama years, with their unchecked police brutality targeting Blacks, Latinos, Native Americans and other people of color, the United States has now slipped even deeper into a downwards spiral of vicious fear-mongering against those already most victimized by it.

Trump does not represent some unstoppable fascist advance. Several of his obnoxious initiatives, most notably his Muslim ban, have been blocked (at least temporarily) by people pouring out into the streets and demonstrating at airports.

Make no mistake: it wasn’t the courts or the Constitution that saved the day. It was the popular outpouring in the streets – Muslims, immigrants AND those in solidarity with them – raising their voices in unity. (more…)

Just two of the wonderful signs that will be in the Pride march Boston on Saturday. Many thanks to the WWP and Stonewall Warriors for these signs. For more information and contact for the contingent that will march go to Andie Michelle ‎Stonewall Warriors QTPOC Liberation Anti-capitalist Contingent post. 

The contingent has this to say and we support and agree 100%:

1) We stand against exclusion or radical POC voices: We will not ride at the back of this bus—Stop silencing of political voices!
2) Black Trans Lives Matter—Speak out & ACT-UP against transmisogynist violence!
3) We are anti-capitalist & anti-“corporate pride”: Get Big $$$ OUT of Pride—No blood money from prison & pipeline profiteers!
4) We stand against racist police brutality and white-supremacist, Islamophobic, anti-immigrant terrorism; our demand is “Refuse to accept Police & ICE terror!” & Sin Justicia NO HAY ORGULLO! (without justice there is no Pride).

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Image may contain: 1 person, text

This collection contains essays on LGBT Liberation.

1.We Take No Pride Leaflet passed out a Pride in 2002.

2. Political Pride Federal Building, 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Queers Without Borders Pride Leaflet, not dated.

4. No Drag Queens at Stonewall you say? We say take a flying fuck.

5. Two very important essays containing information on the history of our movement here in Ct. Found HERE.

6. Holy Matrimony Batman, essay by Jeri Marie Liesegang.

7. Somewhere along the way the movement for liberation  was hijacked and these, marriage and the right to serve in the military became the cause of the moment. Yes, we know straights will like you better if you’re just like them and please don’t forget the only difference is what you do in bed.  10 Essays on Marriage and the Military.

New York City. 1970

Image result for huey newton speech on gay rights

On August 15, 1970, Newton delivered a speech in New York, titled “A Letter to the Revolutionary Brothers and Sisters About The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements.”

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion.

I say ”whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with.

We must gain security in ourselves and therefore have respect and feelings for all oppressed people. We must not use the racist attitude that the white racists use against our people because they are Black and poor. Many times the poorest white person is the most racist because he is afraid that he might lose something, or discover something that he does not have. So you’re some kind of a threat to him. This kind of psychology is in operation when we view oppressed people and we are angry with them because of their particular kind of behavior, or their particular kind of deviation from the established norm.

Remember, we have not established a revolutionary value system; we are only in the process of establishing it. I do not remember our ever constituting any value that said that a revolutionary must say offensive things towards homosexuals, or that a revolutionary should make sure that women do not speak out about their own particular kind of oppression. As a matter of fact, it is just the opposite: we say that we recognize the women’s right to be free. We have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.

And what made them homosexual? Perhaps it’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand entirely. Some people say that it is the decadence of capitalism. I don’t know if that is the case; I rather doubt it. But whatever the case is, we know that homosexuality is a fact that exists, and we must understand it in its purest form: that is, a person should have the freedom to use his body in whatever way he wants.

That is not endorsing things in homosexuality that we wouldn’t view as revolutionary. But there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.

When we have revolutionary conferences, rallies, and demonstrations, there should be full participation of the gay liberation movement and the women’s liberation movement. Some groups might be more revolutionary than others. We should not use the actions of a few to say that they are all reactionary or counter-revolutionary, because they are not.

We should deal with the factions just as we deal with any other group or party that claims to be revolutionary. We should try to judge, somehow, whether they are operating in a sincere revolutionary fashion and from a really oppressed situation. (And we will grant that if they are women they are probably oppressed.) If they do things that are unrevolutionary or counter-revolutionary, then criticize that action.

If we feel that the group in spirit means to be revolutionary in practice, but they make mistakes in interpretation of the revolutionary philosophy, or they do not understand the dialectics of the social forces in operation, we should criticize that and not criticize them because they are women trying to be free. And the same is true for homosexuals. We should never say a whole movement is dishonest when in fact they are trying to be honest. They are just making honest mistakes. Friends are allowed to make mistakes. The enemy is not allowed to make mistakes because his whole existence is a mistake, and we suffer from it. But the women’s liberation front and gay liberation front are our friends, they are our potential allies, and we need as many allies as possible.

We should be willing to discuss the insecurities that many people have about homosexuality. When I say “insecurities,” I mean the fear that they are some kind of threat to our manhood. I can understand this fear. Because of the long conditioning process which builds insecurity in the American male, homosexuality might produce certain hang-ups in us. I have hang-ups myself about male homosexuality. But on the other hand, I have no hang-up about female homosexuality. And that is a phenomenon in itself. I think it is probably because male homosexuality is a threat to me and female homosexuality is not.

We should be careful about using those terms that might turn our friends off. The terms “faggot” and “punk” should be deleted from our vocabulary, and especially we should not attach names normally designed for homosexuals to men who are enemies of the people, such as [Richard] Nixon or [John] Mitchell. Homosexuals are not enemies of the people.

We should try to form a working coalition with the gay liberation and women’s liberation groups. We must always handle social forces in the most appropriate manner.

Note:

I will only add here that many of us in the early days of the “Gay” rights movement felt empowered by Huey P. Newton’s speech and knew then that we had been accepted by a man we regarded as a revolutionary leader in the struggle for liberation of the people. We have many times over the years expressed deep thanks to Huey P. Newton for this letter and his support.