Archive for the ‘Solidarity’ Category

We wish to share this and ask that others share it also. Help get this word out to anyone in the Muslim community who may experience profiling. With the recent U.S Supreme Court ruling this becomes very important.

Racial profiling is on the rise. If you have experienced discrimination at a U.S. airport or border crossing, let us know:

Have you been treated differently by officials at an airport or U.S. border crossing because of your perceived race or religion? Do you believe that you have you been prevented or delayed from boarding a plane or entering the United States because of who you are or what you look like? Have you encountered difficulty while traveling because of your religion, place of birth, ethnicity, or national origin?

For more information and to contact Muslim Advocates go to HERE.

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Someone asked us once why do you always seem to be against some LGBT folks, like HRC, reformists and liberals. Why do you rally against folks in the LGBT community who believe reform is the way to go? Well be certain of one thing, when we see things like the photo we cringe, we are disgusted, and we know fight on! Many thanks to Pink and Black Anarchists for sharing this on their site. You know we have been fighting for years against those who we say have “straightened their genes”, our essays testify to that. We have called for united fronts with other groups since the late 60’s when we were young out of the closet and fighting what we had hoped to be the revolution. We were out to change amerikkka and amerikkka didn’t like us. But you know we are still here and amerikkka has gotten worse. It makes us very happy when the young rise up and breath the truth into the LGBT movement and far beyond. Political queers who will not take the shit handed down to them. Young queers with their heads on their shoulders, queerly as fuck, standing up to those in the movement who just don’t get it. Not afraid to say so, not afraid to speak truth to power. Not satisfied with only LGBT rights but have the answer to that age old saying we are here there and everywhere. So it follows all issues are our issue. Fight on young folks. Fight on Pink and Black Anarchists. Fight on Blue Lives Murder. Fight on Familia TQLM. Fight on Black Lives Matter. Fight on No Justice, No Pride. This time around the revolution must be won!

Posting from Pink and Black Anarchists:

President of LGBT group killed by Campus Police and the liberals came out with this.

Offensive to say the least. This is the “thin blue line” flag, frequently used as a “police lives matter” symbol in direct opposition to BLM.

A while back we wrote in an essay these words:

Cops are just one component of the bourgeoisie’s repressive apparatus for subjugating the working class and anyone else that strays from the bourgeoisie norm.

Historically, cops have been perhaps the #1 most dangerous enemy of gay / trans / queer people for decades, and continue to target us today. Diana’s little Corner in the Nutmeg State recently published an article and had this to say:

“How did the rising at Coopers Donuts (1959), Dewey Lunch (1965), Compton’s Cafeteria (1966), and Stonewall Inn (1969) start?
With polices raids on “homosexuals” where they were checking for three items of male clothing. In other words they were looking for trans people.

“Perhaps no one illustrated potential issues between police and LGBTQ communities more than Nadine Ruff. A transgender woman, Ruff said she had reported a sexual assault to New Haven police but was ridiculed. Ruff said the police response re-victimized her, which she said is an experience that’s too common.

“You need to know about this community,” Ruff said. “We fear police.”

One of the people who commented on this flag with the blue police line and to a supporter of this flag had this to say. (we think it sums it up for anyone who doesn’t know what this is all about.)

“It’s a bad thing because cops are oppressors who have a long history of targeting LGBT groups and individuals, and the murder of an LGBT person should not be tarnished by using it as an opportunity to show support for cops. Further, even aside from this instance, when there are two groups, and one is clearly oppressing the other, posting something like the above flag is essentially saying “Why can’t I support both the oppressors and the oppressed?” which, in its ultimate effect, is the same as saying “I support the oppressors. Fuck the oppressed.”

Lastly, it’s not projecting if it accurately describes your position insofar as you have expressed it. Stop licking police boots.”… Kana Robert Ewing.

This flag and this liberal was responding to the shooting death of Scout Schultz. At the time of Schultz murder we published this essay found HERE.

RIP SCOUT SCHULTZ!

To find out more about Pink and Black Anarchist go to HERE. 

 

Is capitalism the most successful economic and political system ever created ??

The wealthiest 691 people on earth have a net worth of $2.2 trillion, equivalent to the combined annual GDP of 145 countries more than all of Latin America and Africa combined! Despite the huge quantity of wealth produced and accumulated in a few hands, the details of how so much of humanity actually lives, the numbers and conditions of the wretched of the earth are outrageous.

Of the approximately 6.3 billion people in the world:

1-About half of humanity (three billion people) are malnourished and are chronically short of calories, proteins, vitamins, and/or minerals. Many more are “food insecure,” not knowing where their next meal is coming from. The UN estimates that “only” 840 million (including ten million in the wealthy core industrialized countries) are undernourished, but this is greatly below most other estimates.

2-One billion live in slums (about one-third of the approximately three billion people living in cities).

3-About half of humanity lives on less than what two dollars a day can purchase in the United States.

4- One billion have no access to clean water.

5- Two billion have no electricity.
Another part of the human condition over the past two and a half centuries of industrial capitalism has been the almost continuous warfare with hundreds of millions of people killed.

Occupation, slavery, genocide, wars, and exploitation are part of the continuing history of capitalism. Wars have resulted from capitalist countries fighting among themselves for dominance and access to global markets, from attempts to subjugate colonies or neo-colonies, and ethnic or religious differences among people, many of which have been exacerbated by colonial occupation and/or imperial interference. the basic driving force of capitalism, to accumulate capital, compels capitalist countries to penetrate foreign markets and expand their market share.

via comrade KD

From PSL Albuquerque

Nov. 19, 1915: Labor Organizer Joe Hill Is Executed

Workers of the world, awaken!

Break your chains, demand your rights.
All the wealth you make is taken
B y exploiting parasites.
Shall you kneel in deep submission
From your cradles to your graves?
Is the height of your ambition
To be good and willing slaves?
Arise, ye prisoners of starvation!
Fight for your own emancipation;
Arise, ye slaves of ev’ry nation, in One Union Grand.
Our little ones for bread are crying;
And millions are from hunger dying;
The end the means is justifying,
‘Tis the final stand.
If the workers take a notion,
They can stop all speeding trains;
Every ship upon the ocean
They can tie with mighty chains;
Every wheel in the creation,
Every mine and every mill,
Fleets and armies of the nation,
Will at their command stand still.
-Chorus-
Join the union, fellow workers,
Men and women, side by side;
We will crush the greedy shirkers
Like a sweeping, surging tide;
For united we are standing,
But divided we will fall;
Let this be our understanding-
“All for one and one for all.”
-Chorus-
Workers of the world, awaken!
Rise in all your splendid might;
Take the wealth that you are making —
It belongs to you by right.
No one for bread will be crying,
We’ll have freedom, love and health,
When the grand red flag is flying
In the Worker’s commonwealth.

This essay is very informative, beautiful, well written and the facts that Ms. Metcalfe has gathered sure to make you cry and get angry. There are links, videos and names that she has gathered for our community to be well informed. We thank Anna-Jayne Metcalfe for permission to link to her article and publish here on furbirdsqueerly. Too many dead, far to many.

She begins the essay this way:

Remembering our dead never gets any easier

by Anna Jayne Metcalfe

Her name was Gwen, but I never knew her.
It was late October 2002, and I was about to leave the family home for the last time. My transition was approaching, my marriage disintegrating and my wife wanted me to move out. I didn’t have anywhere to go, but fortunately a good friend (thanks Tracey!) let me stay on her sofa until I found a place to rent.
That proved to be tricky as I was then quite visibly trans and still had to present as male at work until January. Awareness of trans people among the general public was pretty poor at the time, and when I enquired about places to rent I found that landlords just wouldn’t get back to me. As a result, I didn’t find a new home until December 2002, and even then the landlord was reluctant to consider meeting me (she’d never met a trans person before) until Tracey managed to talk her round over the phone.
Fortunately, once I met my prospective landlord, she was fine (the roadblock was getting past the initial phone enquiry) and that shared house proved to be the safe space I needed for the next two years while I got all of the medical stuff out of the way. I was privileged, and I was lucky.
But I digress. Until late that October I’d never even heard of the Transgender day of Remembrance….and then one day I read about what had happened to Gwen Araujo in Nevada on 4th October 2002 (just a few weeks before I moved out of the family home) and everything changed.

To read the rest of the essay go to HERE.

A few excerpts from the article:

After listing our dead from 2009 to 2017 (the numbers just grow and grow) Ms Metcalfe has this to say:

“How much of that increase is due to improved communication and reporting, the increasing visibility of trans people (remember that as we get more visible the people who want us dead can see more of us too) or other factors, I can’t say. What I can say is that every year, we seem to have more lost souls to mourn and remember.

“Given all this, it shouldn’t be a surprise that the weeks leading up to 20th November are a painful time of year for many trans folks. It’s the time when we not only mourn our dead, but are forcibly reminded of our own vulnerability — and of the fact that there are many people in this world even today who would like nothing better than to torture, mutilate and kill us.
Hard though that is to endure, it is also an opportunity to say “We remember them. We are here, and we refuse to be afraid of those who hate us”.

and this

“Hard though that is to endure, it is also an opportunity to say “We remember them. We are here, and we refuse to be afraid of those who hate us”.

To find a Transgender Day of Remembrance Day event near you go to HERE. This is an excellent resource page.

2017 has already seen at least 25 transgender people fatally shot or killed by other violent means in the USA. TRANSRESPECT has complied a list from around the world. 325 reported murders of trans and gender-diverse people between 1 October 2016 and 30 September 2017 . To see the list go to HERE.

We will continue to work toward justice and equality for transgender people, we mourn those we have lost:

Mesha Caldwell, 41, a black transgender woman from Canton, Mississippi, was found shot to death the evening of January 4. The murder is still under investigation and no suspects have been arrested.
Sean Hake, 23, a transgender man in Sharon, Pennsylvania, died after he was shot by police responding to a 911 call from his mother. A friend told WKBN that Sean “had a genuinely good heart and he had struggled with his problems.”
Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, 28, an American Indian woman who identified as transgender and two-spirit, was found dead in her apartment in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. A suspect, 25-year-old Joshua Rayvon LeClaire, has been arrested and charged with murder and manslaughter in connection with her death.
JoJo Striker, 23, a transgender woman, was found killed in Toledo, Ohio, on February 8. Striker’s mother, Shanda Striker, described her as “funny and entertaining” and said her family loved her deeply.
Tiara Richmond, also known as Keke Collier, 24, was fatally shot in Chicago on the morning of February 21. A transgender woman of color, she was found dead on the same street as two other transgender women that were killed in 2012.
Chyna Doll Dupree, 31, a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed in New Orleans on February 25. Chyna was a much-loved performer in the ballroom community who was visiting friends and family in New Orleans at the time of her death.
Ciara McElveen, 26, a transgender woman of color, was stabbed to death in New Orleans on February 27. McElveen did outreach for the homeless community. As of February 28, 2017, HRC has tracked at least nine murders of transgender people in Louisiana since 2013.
Jaquarrius Holland, 18, was shot to death in Monroe, Louisiana, on February 19. One friend, Chesna Littleberry, told Mic that Holland was “like a younger sister” and had helped her learn to accept herself.
Alphonza Watson, 38, was shot and killed in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 22. Watson’s mother said her daughter was “the sunshine of our family,” a “caring, passionate” person who loved cooking and gardening.
Chay Reed, 28, a transgender woman of color, was shot and killed on April 21 in Miami. Reed’s longtime friend told Mic about their longtime friendship — describing her as someone who was full of life and beloved by many.
Kenneth Bostick, 59, was found with severe injuries on a Manhattan sidewalk, he later died of his injuries. Few details about Bostick’s life have been reported, he is believed to have been homeless at the time he was attacked.*
Sherrell Faulkner, 46, a transgender woman of color died on May 16, of injuries sustained during an attack on November 30, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Police are treating the assault as a homicide. No arrests have been made at this point.
Kenne McFadden, 27, was found in the San Antonio River on April 9. Police believe she was pushed into the river, which runs through downtown San Antonio. A high-school friend of McFadden described her to local media as assertive, charismatic and lovable. No arrests have been made, but police said they have a person of interest in custody.
Kendra Marie Adams, 28, was found in a building that was under construction and had burns on her body on June 13. Police have charged Michael Davis, 45, with Adams’ murder. Adams also went by Josie Berrios, the name used in initial media reports on her death.
Ava Le’Ray Barrin, 17, was shot and killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25 during an altercation in an apartment parking lot. In an online obituary, friends remembered Barrin as a “social butterfly” and an “amazing girl” who “loved to make people laugh.”
Ebony Morgan, 28, was shot multiple times in Lynchburg, Virginia, in the early morning of July 2. Morgan was transferred to a local hospital where she succumbed to her injuries. Authorities have named Kenneth Allen Kelly Jr. as a person of interest in the case.
TeeTee Dangerfield, 32, a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed on July 31 in Atlanta, Georgia. According to the Georgia Voice, Dangerfield “was found with multiple gunshot wounds outside of her vehicle at the South Hampton Estates apartment complex.”
Gwynevere River Song, 26, was shot and killed in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 12. According to their Facebook profile, they identified as “femandrogyne” and a member of the bisexual community.
Kiwi Herring, 30, was killed during an altercation with police on August 22 during an altercation with her neighbor. Relatives told Huffpost the neighbor was transphobic and that excessive force by police led to her death.
Kashmire Nazier Redd, 28, was fatally stabbed by his partner on September 5. A friend wrote on Facebook “[Kashmire] loved hard and just wanted to be loved and [accepted].”
Derricka Banner, 26, was found shot to death in Charlotte, North Carolina on September 12. Friends describe Banner as a “playful spirit” and “go-getter” who enjoyed life.
Scout Schultz, 21, was shot and killed by Georgia Tech campus police on September 16. The GT Progressive Student Alliance, a progressive student advocacy group on campus, called Schultz an “incredible, inspirational member of our community and a constant fighter for human rights.”
Ally Steinfeld, 17, was stabbed to death in Missouri in early September. Three people have been charged in her murder. Steinfeld’s family said Ally “sometimes” identified as female on social media.
Stephanie Montez, 47, was brutally murdered near Robstown, Texas. Montez’s longtime friend, Brittany Ramirez, described her as “one of the sweetest people you’ll ever meet.”
Candace Towns, 30, a transgender woman who was found shot to death in Georgia. Town’s friend, Malaysa Monroe, remembers Towns’ generosity. “If I needed anything she would give it to me. She would give me the clothes off her back,” Monroe said.