Archive for the ‘The Ruling Class Must Be Brought Down!’ Category

Join us and sing along to this wonderful rendition by Folk Hogan of Joe Hill’s There is Power In A Union.

 

“There Is Power in a Union” is one of Joe Hill’s most enduring recruiting songs. After his execution, the song was sung at his funeral in Salt Lake City and again at his funeral in Chicago. The song is performed here by Folk Hogan in Salt Lake City’s Sugar House Park, near the site where Utah’s state prison once stood and where Hill was executed by a firing squad on Nov. 19, 1915.

Lyrics:
Would you have freedom from wage slavery
Then join in the grand Industrial band
Would you from mis’ry and hunger be free
Then come! Do your share, like a man

There is power, there is power
In a band of workingmen
When they stand hand in hand
That’s a power, that’s a power
That must rule in every land
One Industrial Union Grand

Would you have mansions of gold in the sky
And live in a shack, way in the back?
Would you have wings up in heaven to fly
And starve here with rags on your back?
If you’ve had enough of “the blood of the lamb,”
Then join in the grand Industrial band
If, for a change, you would have eggs and ham
Then come! Do your share, like a man

There is power, there is power
In a band of workingmen
When they stand hand in hand
That’s a power, that’s a power
That must rule in every land
One Industrial Union Grand

If you like sluggers to beat off your head
Then don’t organize, all unions despise
If you want nothing before you are dead
Shake hands with your boss and look wise

There is power, there is power
In a band of workingmen
When they stand hand in hand
That’s a power, that’s a power
That must rule in every land
One Industrial Union Grand

Come, all ye workers, from every land,
Come join in the grand Industrial band
Then we our share of this earth shall demand
Come on! Do your share, like a man

There is power, there is power
In a band of workingmen
When they stand hand in hand
That’s a power, that’s a power
That must rule in every land
One Industrial Union Grand

For any reader who doesn’t know who Joe Hill was here is a song sung by Phil Ochs.

One of our all time favorite songs, The Preacher and the Slave or Pie in the Sky written by Joe Hill in 1911. At Christmas time when we pass the Salvation Army ringing their bells next to the collection kettles we love to sing,

“And the starvation army they play, And they sing and they clap and they pray, Till they get all your coin on the drum, Then they tell you when you are on the bum.”

Do you remember this day? I sure do. No for me it wasn’t a turning point I as all ready turned on to a new possibility. The possibility that oppression would end. The possibility that the war in Vietnam would end and the troops would be brought home. The possibility that we would overthrow the Capitalist system and build a just society. So many folks were shocked by the action of the Ohio National Guard. Was I? Not really. I had already at this time been arrested, tear gassed, beaten by cops in many demonstrations, and jailed with 8 others in a cell for 2. I knew beyond a doubt that this system was rotten and had to be changed. No I didn’t put anything past a government that would do what this one was doing in South East Asia. Why would I? Why would any of us? I guess it is a matter of a world view. Do it over there, do it here. It really was all the same to the oppressor. Question the oppressor you end up like Jeffery Miller, Members of MOVE, Fred Hampton, and many other freedom warriors.

I look at the photo today. I look at Mary Anne’s arms outstretched in a WHY! in a scream! I look at the photo and have a question for all of my friends, comrades and enemies in the LGBTQI+ populations. Why? I ask WHY? Why would any of you want to go and join the military, the cops, the National Guard? Your little no job thing, your discrimination is meaningless to those like Mary Ann Vecchio, to the mothers and family of the students killed, to the family and friends of the young Black men and women shot down in the streets of amerikkka, to the mother who just witnessed a drone attack on her home killing her family. You talk about the discrimination you face here in this country so you join up with forces of evil. Why would you want to be a nuisance  to civilization? I ask you all again and again is all inclusion good inclusion? Which side of the barricades are you on and wish to be on? Do you favor the oppressor more than the oppressed? The cop rather than the dead kid in the street or under the rubble of your countries attack. If you favor that which goes against the new day then you can not be a friend of mine.

In memoriam.

As many as 12 Guardsmen turned in unison, pointed their guns simultaneously and began firing. The four students who died at Kent State are (left to right in the cover photo): Allison Krause, William Schroeder, Sandra Scheuer and Jeffrey Miller. Schroeder and Scheuer were not even participating in the protests; they were heading to their next class when they were struck down in a parking lot.

“I heard an order, I believe, from Major Jones, stating turn and face the crowd. The shooting started shortly after.” Ohio National Guard Sgt. Richard K. Love, statement to Ohio Highway Patrol, 1970.

Only following orders it is expected of you. Shoot, Shoot, Shoot. Don’t matter if you are a nice Trans women or man, if you are Gay or Lesbian once there once within that gang follow orders.

For those to young to remember: The Kent State shootings, also known as the May 4 massacre or the Kent State massacre, were the shootings on May 4, 1970, of unarmed college students by members of the Ohio National Guard at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, during a mass protest against the bombing of Cambodia by United States military forces.

To read more about Kent State go to HERE. 

Thanks to Barbara Dane for this great song we are sharing today. Listen then do something.

We know this but we can’t stop it. I began working against war in 1964 when I joined the War Resisters League in NYC. We spoke out, we were beaten and tear gassed by the police, we were arrested, jailed, came out and did in again and again. Stop the wars we yelled. Been in this fight for 55 years against war and against war makers. Give up, never. When I read something like the above it only makes me want to fight harder and bring others into the fight. What could all that money do? A heck of a lot. Never mind the real tragedy the act of killing innocent people. Let this weight heavily on all of us living in the lap of luxury where such things like this are allowed to exist.  A very wise women once said, We have got to change the system otherwise we will be fighting the same old battles over and over. Getting tired of all that over and over aren’t you?

Powerful Gay Rights Groups Excluded Trans People for Decades — Leaving Them Vulnerable to Trump’s Attack
The LGBTQ community needs to grapple with its history of ignoring its most vulnerable members

By Evan Greer

The U.S. government is reportedly considering policy changes that would attempt to definitionally “erase” transgender and non-binary people from federal civil rights law. In practice, this could make it nearly impossible for many of us to get a driver’s license or passport, go to the doctor for basic medical care, get food stamps or rent an apartment.
An attack on marginalized people from the administration behind family separation policies and Muslim travel bans is hardly a surprise. But there’s a reason the transgender community is in the government’s crosshairs. There was a target painted on our backs. And it was put there not just by the religious right and gender essentialist crusaders, but by the mainstream gay rights movement, which for the better part of the last century has repeatedly backed away from — and sometimes even fought on the wrong side of — the battles that most affect trans and gender nonconforming people.

The Mattachine Society and the Daughters of Bilitis, two of the first formally organized gay and lesbian rights organizations in the United States, actively discouraged members from engaging in “deviant” expressions of gender and sexuality. Rather than challenge the rigid and repressive gender roles of postwar America, they embraced them in the interest of political gain. For example, their “Annual Reminder” pickets for gay rights in the late 1960s had a strict dress code: Men had to wear white shirts and slacks, and women had to wear dresses. They fought against discrimination on the grounds that they were “normal homosexuals,” and trans people did not fit under that rubric. These groups thought that conforming to societal standards would advance their singular cause: acceptance.

Throughout the ’60s and ’70s, white, middle-class, cisgender gays and lesbians made advances in both legal protection and social status. States started decriminalizing homosexuality, the American Psychiatric Association declared that it was not a psychiatric disorder, and Elaine Noble, the first openly lesbian or gay legislator, took her seat in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. But those outside the mainstream continued to live in untenable conditions. For gender-nonconforming people, it was nearly impossible to find steady employment, and police routinely raided bars and establishments where they gathered.

Resistance swelled in uprisings like the Compton Cafeteria riot in 1966, in which trans women and drag queens resisted arrest at a 24-hour eatery in San Francisco, and later the Stonewall rebellion, where crowds led by trans and gender-nonconforming people of color, sex workers and youths fought back against the police who regularly harassed, beat and violated them. Gender-defiant activists such as Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson emerged as leaders. As a direct response to the failure of other gay rights groups to fight for the most vulnerable, they founded the collective Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, which provided a shelter for trans people in New York.

Still, the leadership of the Gay Activists Alliance cut trans people out of New York City’s landmark 1971 attempt to pass anti-discrimination legislation, by removing protections for gender identity and presentation. They claimed that such an “extreme” bill could never succeed. Even with this “compromise,” it didn’t pass until 1986. (more…)

We have been tossing around the ideas of our people the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender populations joining the military. Let’s make that clear,  let us say right now up front we all know that no one is being forced by draft to become part of this system of oppression. How times have changed, my generation did everything they could, pulled every string, every and anything out of the hat to avoid the military. Today those who are in the military are in there voluntary for whatever reasons they may have. Second we would like to ask folks who are thinking that they should join Uncle Scam’s army and stand arm in arm with this man, please stop and ask of those who survived a bombed out village, or somewhere where old Scam has tread what they think of GI Joe and Jane’s dirty deeds. As we have said before ask the mother whose children have been killed in a drone attack what she thinks of you being discriminated against in the U.S. Ask the man what he thinks about the no job thing in Amerikkka as he digs with his bare hands through the rubble to find his lover. Ask those who cities have been reduced to dust. Then stop and ask yourselves is this the type of job you really want? For what reasons? Where do your or anyone’s civil rights end and the life rights of the world’s population under the attack of the United States begin? Where do the life rights of all humans begin?

This is a short essay to examine a hero of ours. A man named Frank Little. A man who fought for freedom and justice for the working class of amerikkka. This man outspoken and murdered by those who wished to hold up not their class but the class of boss, the class of the rulers, the class of which as the IWW statement says “we have nothing in common with.” No we don’t have anything in common at all. Nothing in common in the workplace, nothing in common in the military, nothing in common at all. So we often have wondered why would anyone who has nothing in common with the bosses, why would they want to cross that line? If it be a picket line set up by striking workers or the class line. Why do so many in the working class want to cross the class line and become as Frank Little said in one of his last speeches “Uncle Sam’s scabs in uniforms”? Fighting for the rich, fighting in wars against other working class and poor people.

Frank Little was a IWW rabble rouser, organizer, free speech advocate, union organizer and a strong opponent of World War I. Little fought hard with the leaders of the IWW to directly proceed with anti-war and anti-conscription agitation. Little said at that time, “the IWW is opposed to all wars, and we must use all our power to prevent the workers from joining the army. He later called soldiers serving in the war, “Uncle Sam’s scabs in uniforms.” and stated: “Wars should be left to the capitalists who start the war. “Either we are for their capitalist slaughter fest or against it.”

This blog remains against not only wars but against the Capitalist. Turn on your masters, overthrow the capitalist system! The cry is the same today. Let us break free and break free now from those chains that bind us. In another speech at Finlander Hall, Little referred to U.S. soldiers as “uniformed thugs” and stressed his opposition to the draft and the war. Why, he asked, would workers choose to fight for their capitalist masters, when instead they could end the war by turning on their masters and overthrowing the capitalist system?

The bosses tell us, protect what belongs to you. This is our country and we are under threat. We have always wonder about this “our” I can’t remember the essay that I read years ago about this “our” and have to agree I have a hard time believing that amerikkka is our anything. There is such a class divide in this country that I can say, I have nothing in common with bosses, the upper middle class, nothing at all with the wealthy and ruling class. This country is “ours” in th way a prison cell “belongs to the prisoner.” We live here, but it has never been ours. So why fight for something that isn’t ours? Does anyone expect that we will take back that something? One can not take back something that isn’t theirs to begin with. We can only topple it and transform it to what we see as a new day, a new way of living, a new world that many have told us is possible. Many years ago our people when on the right road right after the Stonewall rebellion talked about this very subject, that of toppling and transforming we did not see fit to try to win acceptance within the institutions that oppressed us and many others. We formed united fronts and fought back. But early on the road to liberation a wrong turn was taken and now so many find thenselves wanting to fit in, in any way we can. We did not listen too well and so many are still not listening.

Some will say, you are fools. What are we suppose to do until the revolution comes. We would have to answer the revolution will never come if one, two and many side with the masters and then in turn think everything is okay since the master now appears to love you. Once a person feels that way no matter what chains still bind he or she becomes a part of the problem and the weight is not balanced but suddenly tips the scales to the masters side. As we have said in many essays, crumbs shaken from the masters table cloth can never fill our bellies.

So we must ask why would anyone who is oppressed want to join with the oppressor and fight for the oppressor only to be oppressed when the fighting is over? Why would anyone want to uphold years of oppression against their own people, against others and against folks thousands of miles away? One thing we know we must get past is self centered amerikkkan idea of “us here,” forgetting that we are very much a part of a great big world. Karl Marx never said, Workers of Germany unite, or of France, but “Workers Of The World Unite.” Workers of the world unite. A most powerful idea. How about it?

We will continue to stand against imperialist war, the ruling class and must ask ourselves how can we not stand against those who help to push this agenda for any reason.  If we stand with the world then we cannot stand with anything or anyone who is a part of destroying it.

Frank Little declared that a person could make a living three ways: by working, begging, or stealing. The only conclusion he had was that the capitalist class were thieves since they did not work or beg for a living. So who wants to align themselves with thieves? To us at furbirdsqueerly the working class must be anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist, internationalist and revolutionary.

Frank Little: Slain by Capitalist Interests For Organizing and Inspiring His Fellow Men.

Another question remains, when the shit hits the fan and barricades are erected all across amerikkka, which side will you be on? Will you follow orders of your captain and shoot? Will you blow the rainbow flag from a queers hands? Will you say in the future when asked, “I was only following orders.” Yes, which side are you on?

We know some folks could care less about this article. Frank Little, The IWW, anti-war work, or revolutionary movements. So many never even heard of Frank Little or even are remotely interested in what we say here. But to those who do we can only ask, Stop for a second, think about these things, before you go off and join in the chorus of inclusion that is not good. Inclusion that is no good for anyone not here or not anywhere around the world. Don’t go off and join the military, don’t be killed by the capitalist class doing their bidding. You will never be truly free in this society as to them, to the straight world you are an outsider. Of course as the old saying goes, you will make good cannon fodder. But remember you will always be an outsider and when the push comes to shove you will find that out once again. Take a lesson from history, if you must read between the lines, and run, yes run in the other direction. Uncle Scam and his murderous ways are no good for you, no good for the people of the world and no good for the planet. Let us all celebrate life and not be absorbed into the military death machine.

NOTES:

Montana History Revealed. Remembering Frank Little. by Rich Aarstad, Senior Archivist, and Martha Kohl, Historical Specialist

Hell Raisers Journal: We will Never Forget. The Labor Martyrs Project: Dedicated to the men, women and children who lost their lives in freedom cause.

  1. Hellraisers Journal, Saturday August 4, 1917. Butte, Montana – Strikers’ Bulletin Names Names
  2. BUTTE’S NAME TARNISHED BY THE STAIN OF LYNCH LAW FRANK LITTLE HANGED FROM TRESTLE BY UNKNOWN MOB

Frank Little By Will Rosco is a must read for many of us who are LGBT. The article is found HERE.   We want to do further research on Frank Little as a gay man which Will Rosco brought to our attention in this article.

 

 

Decolonize This Place Announces January 26 Town Hall Regarding Whitney Museum’s Tear Gas Problem

The group’s recent letter calls for continued action, adding “Inaction with respect to the art-washing industrial complex of contemporary art makes our field complicit with death, disaster, and destruction.”

by Hrag Vartanian

as reposted from Hyperallergic


graphic from Decolonize This Place

The Decolonize This Place movement is calling for continued action against the Whitney Museum after news that one of the institution’s vice chairs owns Safariland, which is a manufacturer that was supplying tear gas to border authorities that gassed a group of migrants last month. The issue, first reported by Hyperallergic, has caused a wave of protest and guerrilla actions across the city.
On Sunday, December 9, dozens of protesters occupied the lobby of the Manhattan museum, chanting “Fire! Fire! Fire to the colonizers!” while they burned sage and unfurled banners. A few days later artist Rafael Shimunov staged his own quiet protest on the walls of the museum. Other actions in New York City subway stations and elsewhere have also taken place.
The newest letter, published in its entirety below, is calling for a #J26 town hall assembly on January 26, while emphasizing solidarity with museum staff and the “conspicuous silence from many artists, curators, historians, and critics, including those whose work is celebrated for its engagement with themes of politics, social practice, racial justice, and even institutional critique.”

To read the rest of the article go to HERE. 

We Agree Kanders Must Go!