Archive for the ‘Trans Liberation’ Category

We received notice via them. that our sister liberation warrior, mother of the Trans Latinx community in Queens New York Lorena Borjas has died from the Covid-19 virus. Wren Sanders writing in an excellent article about Lorena opened the announcement this way:

“Lorena Borjas — a human trafficking survivor and lifelong defender of immigrants, sex workers, and trans folks — died this morning from complications due to COVID-19, according to tweets by Bianey Garcia, Borjas’s chosen daughter. She was 60 years old.

Known as the mother of the trans Latinx community in Queens, Borjas earned the reputation through a roughly 30-year career as a community organizer. Beyond leading some of the first marches to specifically honor the trans women of Jackson Heights, Borjas advocated for her sisters through organizing HIV testing opportunities for trans sex workers, establishing a fund that would bail out folks who were arrested on prostitution charges, and through running syringe-exchange programs for trans women taking hormone injections. She was a leader in her community, a voice of wisdom, and a guide for activists in generations to come.”

Please follow the link to read the article HERE.

From us at Furbirdsqueerly we can only say, Rest In Power Liberation Warrior Lorena Borjas and thank you for all that you have done for our people.

This wonderful documentary on the life of our liberation warrior Sylvia Rivera was put together by Jerimarie Liesegang the mother of the Ct. Transgender movement. Enjoy and remember we are still in a fight for our very lives. We need more Sylvia’s in the world today.

Hello to all

Important things have been happening in the background and a rumbling is heard. I am very proud to announce that Jerimarie Liesegang has finished her video documentary on Sylvia Rivera. The documentary Sylvia Rivera Was More Than Stonewall is one of the few possibly the only one that looks at the complete life of this Revolutionary Transgender Warrior. Twenty years ago I was honored to introduce Sylvia at the Ct. Stonewall Congress and to this day hold her dear in my heart. What fun myself, Regina Dyton, Tim, Paul and a few others had visiting with Sylvia and her family outside as we smoked and laughed and then laughed again. Sylvia indeed as a revolutionary Trans leader whose words ring true today. Sylvia who believed in a multi issue revolutionary movement where all of us were and are included. Sylvia who fought hard for her people in the Trans community and was thrown off the bus, and under the bus so many times.

We need more Sylvia’s in our movement today. If there were we all know the one issue or issues only of a LGBT nature would not exist. We would understand and see the connections with all other communities and not only act when it involves a LGBT person. We would understand fully that when the bombs drop on the people of Palestine it is our issue. We would know that when Democrat or Republican deports immigrants it is our issue. We would fully understand that when people all across this country can not afford medication that is needed, or a home to live in it is our issue. We would fight back when the least among us are hurting and become one with all. This I believe is what Sylvia Rivera would do as she proved over and over again this is what must be done. This was the inspiration that pushed us towards a new day before a wrong road was taken so many years ago. We must, let us repeat that we must move back to those days when we fully understood that we are here, there, and everywhere so there for all issues are our issues. It is the only way we will survive.

Anyway there I go again up on the soapbox but wanted to give just my little introduction to Jeri’s video.  Of course this type of work is best viewed on full screen for a full viewing pleasure. While you are over at the Ct. Trans Archive page check out all the work that Jeri has been doing lately as she posts and gets her archives in order to send down to CCSU.

My best to everyone
Richard Nelson

P.S A birdie told me a new Ct. movement documentary is now in the works. It’s good folks really good or so the birdie saw.

The documentary is found here:

Full Length (cradle to grave) documentary on Sylvia Rivera

It’s Been Twenty Years and We Are Still Remembering!
By Jerimarie Liesegang

In 1999, Gwendolyn Ann Smith started the Transgender Day of Remembrance to memorialize the murder of (transgender woman) Rita Hester (a East Hartford Native) in Allston, Massachusetts. The TDOR has slowly evolved from the Remembering Our Dead Names list started by Smith into a national and then an international Remembrance and day of action.
In 2002, Ct TransAdvocacy (It’s Time, Connecticut) held Connecticut’s first Transgender DOR (Click here to view the 2002 event on CtTransArchives). In that year we remembered 15 US transwomen brutally murdered, many of them trans women of color. Including the brutal murder of Gwen Araujo, a 17 year old who had been living in their preferred gender role for approximately a year and a half. During a house party, she was revealed to have been more a male. After this revelation, at least three individuals allegedly beat her, dragged her into a garage, and strangled her, before disposing of her body in a remote location 150 miles away.

Yesterday the NYTimes ran an article with the title:

18 TRANSGENDER KILLINGS THIS YEAR RAISE FEARS OF AN ‘EPIDEMIC’
The killings, many of them against transgender women of color, have deeply disturbed groups already familiar with threats to their safety.
According to this article, the AMA is declaring the alarming rate of Trans Murders an epidemic. In the United States this year, at least 18 transgender people — most of them transgender women of color — have been killed in a wave of violence that the American Medical Association has declared an “epidemic.” The killings, which have been reported across the country, have for some prompted a heightened sense of vigilance.

And of course we must note that statistics do not capture the full list of Trans murders since many go unreported, dismissed as a murder of a sex worker, not to mention the many hate crimes other than the ultimate crime of murder. A well known example is the highly probable murder of Marsha P. Johnson. (per wiki: Shortly after the 1992 pride parade, Johnson’s body was discovered floating in the Hudson River. Police initially ruled the death a suicide, but Johnson’s friends and other members of the local community insisted Johnson was not suicidal and noted that the back of Johnson’s head had a massive wound.)

I had never thought that on that day of November 20th, 2002, that we would be remembering AT LEAST 18 brutal US Murders in 2019 ~ Twenty Years after the first Official Remembering Our Trans Dead!!!! We need to continue to remember each year, if not each day, and say Presente! for each of our trans comrades who have been brutally murdered simply for being who they are. BUT we must do more than just remember, since for far too many years, even preceding 1999, we continue to loose our families due to Hate and insensitivity to sex/gender fluidity. I recall that after Gwen’s murder, we had discussions that the community needs to work with our youth to empower them to learn how to be Out and assure they maintain safe surroundings, especially when having sex. Though we know the issue is much deeper and more complex than that simple view. I do view this in two lenses: (more…)

As long as trans people—many of them Black trans women—continue to be murdered, there will be a need to commemorate their lives, work to prevent more deaths, and uplift Black trans activism.

A tribute to Raquel Willis.

 

Raquel Willis

The Black Transgender Pride Flag

What a beautiful flag, what a beautiful flag this the flag of the Black Transgender Community. Raquel Willis African American writer, editor, and Transgender activist designed a Black Transgender Pride Flag. It has a black stripe in the middle instead of the white stripe as in the original flag. Willis stated that she created the flag to represent the higher levels of discrimination, violence, and murder that the black trans community face in contrast to the larger transgender movement. It was used on August 2015 by Black Trans activists throughout the U.S as a part of the first Black Trans Liberation Tuesday, and was held in conjunction with Black Lives Matter, for the Black Transgender Women murdered throughout the year.

Raquel Willis knew at an early age that she was different. As a teenager, she came out as gay, and eventually found acceptance from her peers and parents. She attended college at the University of Georgia, where she encountered more harassment for being gender non-conforming. She came to realize that she was a trans woman, and decided to transition. She worked with other students to counter discrimination based on gender identity. Willis graduated in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Willis moved to Oakland and got involved with transgender and gender non-conforming people of color, worked as  acommunications associate, and then as a national organizer for the Transgender Law Center.

Willis was one of the speakers at the 2017 Women’s March in Washington, D.C. She later stated that though she was glad to be there, she felt that trans women were an “afterthought in the initial planning”, and she was cut off by organizers when she tried to say this at the demonstration itself.

In December 2018, Willis was appointed as executive editor of Out magazine, becoming the first trans woman to take on a leadership position at that publication.

We at furbirdsqueerly celebrate the work and life of Raquel Willis. Thank you Ms. Willis for standing out, tall and proud.

A must read article is an interview by Raquel Willis with Miss Major Griffin-Gracey, TransVisionaries: How Miss Major Helped Spark the Modern Trans Movement. Our Black Trans Sister Revolutionary who fought back at Stonewall and continues to today in a revolutionary spirit. Miss Griffin-Gracey just did a wonderful video stating No Cops At Pride.

Always the warrior Miss Major Griffin-Gracey had this to say:

Q. “We are in a moment of visibility like never before. What does that mean to you with the political backdrop of the Trump Administration?”

A. “This president wants to eradicate us from the face of the earth. He doesn’t have a belief system and he’s not a politician. When he won this, my worry was that our community would become so fearful of what he may do, that they [might] run blindly into the closet and hide. This is a time that we can’t hide. We need to have our presence known. I don’t want to see trans people on the endangered species list. I’m hoping being out there myself that people will see me going on and believe that we can do this.”

Every Breath a Black Trans Woman Takes Is an Act of Revolution… Lourdes Ashley Hunter 

Some facts. Why we support the Black Stripe and Our Trans Sisters. 

Trans and gender non-conforming people of color are disproportionately impacted by physical and structural violence. According to The National LGBTQ Task Force, Black trans people have a household income of less than 10k a year and almost 50% have attempted suicide. What is equally disturbing is the silence from mainstream media, the Black social justice and LGBT organizations. The same systems that are designed to protect us is actively engaging in erasure. When looking at the mainstream Black and LGBT organizations leadership teams and Board of Directors, they lack diversity and representation. How can their work be informed if they don’t even hire us? Denying a Black Trans woman a job is an act of violence. Denying Black trans folk access to healthcare is an act of violence. Denying Black trans people platforms to speak and represent themselves is erasure. Actively engaging in erasure is an act of violence. .. Lourdes Ashley Hunter, Every Breath A Black Trans Women Takes Is An Act Of Revolution.  (more…)

New Haven Rally & Speakout: Trans People #WontBeErased!
Public · Hosted by Party for Socialism and Liberation – CT and Party for Socialism and Liberation – PSL

Saturday October 27, 2018

1:00pm-2:30pm

WHEN: Saturday, October 27 @ 1pm
WHERE: downtown New Haven courthouse – 121 Elm St

WHAT: Join us for an emergency demonstration to show that New Haven says NO to the Trump administration’s efforts to legislate trans people out of existence!

A couple days ago, the New York Times exposed a plan by the Department of Health and Human Services to redefine gender as it pertains to Title IX protections in an unscientific and deeply transphobic manner. This threatens the safety of trans and intersex people, especially youth and students, and could strip our community both of protections from discrimination and of access to correct documentation.

Actions are taking place across the country – let’s show that Connecticut will not stay silent and will fight for trans rights!

Currently co-sponsored by:
ANSWER CT
Party for Socialism and Liberation – CT
New Haven Pride Center
Planned Parenthood of Southern New England
Trans At Yale
Connecticut Bail Fund
Connecticut Women’s Education and Legal Fund (CWEALF)
Trans Lifeline
Yale Young Democratic Socialists
CT Green Party
True Colors
Socialist Action CT

CO-SPONSORS WANTED! If your organization wants to cosponsor this event, please email ct@pslweb.org!