Archive for the ‘we dig it.’ Category

A joy to pass each day on my way to work. A bit of an uplift in these troubling times. We dedicate this picture to Heather Heyer. Presente’

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After a summer of exploring identity, intersectionality and youth leadership, our Queer Academy campers are draguating! You’re invited to Queer Academy’s Draguation on Sunday, August 20th for a show, a ceremony, and a celebration! Queer Academy campers will share their messages from the stage through drag, song, dance and more…

Draguation will be at TheaterWorks from 6:00 – 9:00 PM, with a Silent Auction included.

Draguation is free and open to the public, but donations are accepted.

Facebook Page HERE.

I don’t even remember when I first heard this song but this version by Sweet Honey In The Rock has got to be one of the best. Listen and enjoy.

Those few words indeed sum up the nights in June 1969 of the Stonewall Rebellion. The words were spoken by Storme’ DeLarverie. Many thanks to Marc Burns for sending us this article.

“She was cut from the movie, his-story was rewritten as usual, but let’s set the record straight (no pun intended): a butch lesbian was responsible for starting the first Stonewall riot at 1:20 a.m. on June 28, 1969. That night, a brave woman of color, Stormé DeLarverie was hit on the head with a billy club and handcuffed. She was bleeding from the head when she brazenly turned to the crowd and hollered, “WHY DON’T YOU DO SOMETHING!?”

After a long struggle, Stormé was dragged into a paddy wagon and that’s when the scene exploded. That summer night a revolution began and it was a strong butch woman of color that is reported to have thrown the first punch. Exactly one year later, on June 28,1970, the first Pride parade took place. It was more of a political demonstration in response to what happened at Stonewall.”The Stonewall Inn was owned and operated by the Mafia. They checked through a peephole before you could enter, and if you weren’t gay, you weren’t getting into the club. When police officers would barge in, it meant trouble. Back then, cross-dressing was illegal and you could be arrested for not wearing a certain number of “gender-appropriate” articles of clothing.

“Stormé DeLarverie, who was born to an African American mother and a white father in the 1920s, performed as a drag king and was one of several “butch” lesbians that fought against the police on the night of the riots. When Stormé threw the very first punch that night, it was in self-defense. “The cop hit me, and I hit him back,” Stormé recounted.”Stormé DeLarverie served the lesbian community for decades as a volunteer street patrol worker. She patrolled the lesbian bars to keep what she lovingly referred to as her “baby girls” safe. She was androgynous, tall, dark, handsome and legally armed. She did this all the way up until she was 80-something-years-old, retiring in the early 2000s. In 2017, there are less than a handful of lesbian bars remaining in the U.S. The last remaining lesbian bar in San Francisco, the Lexington Club, closed its doors in 2015. Stormé is fondly remembered as a “gay superhero”—a fearless protector of the lesbian spaces that have all but gone extinct “Stormé DeLarverie died in her sleep in Brooklyn on May 24, 2014.”

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Let’s hear it from the Stonewall Vets web site about Storme’

K. Stormé DeLarverie was born ‘way down yonder’ in New Orleans, Louisiana.  It was incredibly not long after the end of World War I (One) on Christmas Eve, December 24 of 1920 — ironically and prophetically, the year that American women won the right to vote in America!  To quote Stormé:  “I’ve been fighting for the Gay community ever since!”  Stormé has a silvery baritone voice with a jazz-oriented sound.  In the 1940s, Stormé was a solo performer with a three-piece band.  Stormé is probably best known for being part of the legendary Jewel Box Revue, a popular “drag” performance group which toured America — not always under the best of accommodations or circumstances.

The Jewel Box Revue ensemble was composed of two dozen males dressed beautifully and seductively as females and one biological female dressed very gentlemanly and convincingly as a man:  Stormé!  It’s a role he does persuasively on stage and off.  During the 1950s and the 1960s, Stormé was the Jewel Box’s only male impersonator.  He did so as a fine gentleman.  The entertaining uniqueness was that the entire talented troupe were in gender-bender roles — all except one!  The “J.B.” was a forerunner to the Broadway musical of the mid-1980s, “La Cage aux Folles”.  Unlike the latter, the J.B. confronted acceptance, joyousness, praise and fulfillment on one side but segregation, prejudice, scorn and sadness on the other side of the coin. (more…)

There is an excellent article I read today published on facebook by the Dragon Fly Collective. The article, Roaming Charges: The End of the Age of Protest, written by  Jeffrey St. Clair  and published on Counter Punch is a must read.  To read the whole article go to HERE.

a few lines from the article

“A few days ago, the carbon dioxide readings at the Mauna Loa observatory in Hawai’i cracked 410 parts per million, an all-time record and a frightening one. On Earth Day, climate marches took place in cities across the world. Trump’s policies didn’t drive the spiking CO2 levels, but they did propel tens of thousands onto the streets for a few hours of fun. Where were those people during eight years of Barack Obama, an oil and gas man of some distinction? Where were they during eight years of Bill Clinton, one of the greatest environmental con men of our time?”

and this

“Has Trump finally shattered our illusions, so that we can see clearly the forces—economic, political and technological—that are plunging the planet toward a man-made heat death? Is he, in fact, a kind of clarifying agent for the real state of things?

One can hope so.

Except one mustn’t hope.

As Kafka, the High Priest of Realism, admonished his readers, “There is hope. But not for us.”

Hope is an illusion, an opiate, an Oxycontin for the masses.

Instead of hope, we need a heavy dose of realism. A realism as chilling as reality itself.”

and a big YES to this:

“The time for protests is over.

Protests will not prick the conscience of the unmasked beast called Donald Trump. Trump has no conscience to arouse, no shame to trigger, no remorse to cultivate. Trump is a full-frontal menace, that dangerous object in the mirror that is closer than it appears. It is the old threat, coming at us faster than before and from all directions at once. An unchained beast that will not be moderated by regulations, social conventions or appeals to common decency.”

photo courtesy of Marc Burns

tape, chair, rope, boards, plastic and water

He takes the ordinary and makes it un-ordinary by an almost magical arrangement of materials into puzzles’ and questions that don’t need to be answered necessarily. But gosh when we try we have fun. Draped, wrapped, bound, tied, wound around, mysteries under cover that don’t require me to wonder, what’s under that wrap up? Beautiful presents not to be disturbed by questions of what’s inside. As I sit here writing those words I think “what’s underneath the tarps” never crossed my mind.

Photo courtesy of- Thomas Foran

This art opens up so many possibilities. It doesn’t shut anything down. It doesn’t say aren’t I nice because it doesn’t need to. It is there for the learning, for the moving us from here to there from one place to the next. We don’t always know where we will land or what we are landing on but land somewhere we will. Or then just maybe we won’t, maybe we will keep going, going, going. A push that gives out another push, a new invention inventing another invention.  This work doesn’t say “aren’t I nice for over your sofa,” it doesn’t fit in a nice little nice frame, No telling viewers “I am as slick as slick can be.” It can not, repeat and repeat after so many in the art world and say, “My mommy went to art school and this is what she learned.”  It doesn’t behave itself. It can’t, it doesn’t know how, it won’t, just a few reasons we love it. It doesn’t tell me I am “like” art. It boldly says I am art and means it. For all the reasons, in all the art history we know it is true.

Burns floor, green.

Photo courtesy of- Marc Burns

TEACH US TO OPEN UP OUR EYES (more…)


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Public

April 18, 2017   4:30-5:30
450 Main Street Hartford Ct.
Tax Dodgers for Trump, Rejoice!
Billions more for the rich. More cuts for working people.
This man thinks he’s smarter than you. 10 out of 10 billionaires agree “Not paying your taxes makes me smart”

Some CT lawmakers agree! Sound Fair to you? Hell no. Let’s take it to the streets on Tax Day.
Hell no. Let’s take it to the streets on Tax Day.

Don your best billionaire costume as we thank Trump for fighting for the wealthy on Tax day.

Disclaimer: We’re not really thanking him. We’re just expressing how ridiculous and unfair his budget is for ordinary working and poor people.