Archive for the ‘We fight on’ Category

DC Transgender woman Ashanti Carmon murdered TDOV weekend
by Kelli Busey on March 31, 2019.

A transgender woman was shot and killed early Saturday morning near the D.C. line in Prince George’s County.

Fairmount Heights police said they responded to the area of Aspen and Jost streets around 6:23 a.m. after receiving numerous calls for shots fired. At the scene, a transgender woman was located and pronounced dead at the scene after being shot multiple times.

The victim has been identified as Ashanti Carmon, ABC7 has learned.

“I had seen her I believe on Tuesday because she would come through my office at HIPS,” said Earline Budd, a transgender activist.

HIPS, a group with which Budd is associated, that finds alternatives to sex work for transgender people.

“She wasn’t someone that frequented the streets a lot, so that’s why it’s so shocking and the community is stunned,” Budd said. “I’ve been getting calls all day about this murder.”

R.I.P Ashanti Carmon

Marielle Franco, presente! Today is one year since Franco, a Black queer councilwoman, was murdered in Brazil. This week, two former police officers were arrested suspected of carrying out her murder. Her life should inspire us to fight for the rights of the most marginalized sectors as a path to liberate us all.

Meet organizers defending Marielle’s legacy and fighting against the right wing in Brazil at Feminism for the 99% – Women’s Conference

#mariellefrancopresente

Posted by Gay Shame and written by Micah Bazant.

The SF Contemporary Jewish Museum is supported by the Israeli govt and anti-Muslim, anti-Black, anti-immigrant funders like the Helen Diller Family Foundation.

In their new exhibit “Show Me As I Want to Be Seen”, the museum claims to explore themes of self-determination and self-representation.

How can we explore self-determination in a museum complicit in Israeli apartheid and occupation? Whose selves count? Who gets to live to be an artist?

We are appalled by the CJM’s use of art by Jewish anti-occupation, anti-fascist trans queer ancestors Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore. In the legacy of their resistance, we support Palestinian liberation. Palestinian Liberation Is Self-Determination.

Freedom of self-expression by people of color and queer people can never be premised on the oppression and ethnic cleansing of others. We support marginalized artists, but not Israel’s intentional exploitation of their work to “pinkwash” and “art wash” apartheid. Israel uses culture to brand itself as an oasis of progressive acceptance in the Middle East. But this Israeli “acceptance” doesn’t extend to African asylum seekers or Palestinians. The Israeli army bombs Palestinians, destroys their homes, steals their land, imprisons and tortures them regardless of their gender, sexuality or artistic expression. (more…)

From the publisher: The gripping story of how a multi-racial group of woman warriors put their bodies on the line to gain a foothold in the male and largely white electrical trades at Seattle’s publicly owned utility.

This important new history tells the story of women’s fight to gain entry into electrical trades at Seattle City Light beginning in the 1970s. Female pioneers came forward to implement affirmative action in the face of life-threatening sexism and racism. Some saw the trades as just a means to a better paycheck. But other, more radical, participants sought to build alliances with men of color, white male union members, and office staff to change the culture of discrimination at City Light and in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 77. High Voltage Women offers insights into the role of feminists in Seattle’s vibrant activist and labor movements and exposes the sorry record of city politicians who acted as roadblocks to social progress.

Community historian Ellie Belew has captured the drama, the events, and the personalities in an extensively researched saga. Belew is the author of Bringing Power to the People, the history of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local #77, and Fully Involved, which records the experiences of Washington’s professional fire fighters and their role in the labor movement.

224 pages – Photos, index, notes – ISBN 978-0-932323-34-7
Advance copies are $20.00 (incl. shipping

To order copies from Red Letter Press go to HERE.

With the renewed interest in the history of the Ct. Transgender Movement we are going to publish essays, articles, and ourstories on this site. Some of these essays are ones we have published before and some will be new essays. This site along with Jerimarie Liesegang will began to publish a first person narrative on the history of the Ct. Transgender Movement and the possibility of an exhibition on this continuing struggle next year.  We publish today for those of you who do not have the book, Queering Anarchism: Addressing and Undressing Power and Desire, published by AK Press, a chapter written by Jerimarie Liesegang the mother of the Ct. Transgender Movement an a long time fighter for peace, justice and liberation.

Tyranny of the State and Trans Liberation

By Jerimarie Liesegang

“STAR is a Revolutionary Group. We believe in picking up the gun and starting a revolution if necessary. Our main goal is to see ‘gay’ people liberated and free” —Marsha P. Johnson, “Rapping with a Street Transvestite Revolutionary”[1]

“Trans Liberation is the phrase that has come to refer to all those who blur or bridge the boundary of the sex or gender expression they were assigned at birth: cross-dressers, transsexuals, intersex people, Two Spirits, bearded females, masculine females and feminine males, drag kings and drag queens. Trans Liberation is a call to action for all those who care about civil rights and creating a just and equitable society” —Leslie Feinberg, Trans Liberation: Beyond Pink or Blue[2]

Anarchists (should) understand the importance in opposing the regulation of sexual and gender behavior by governments and other allied forces such as the church and capitalism. In fact there has been a long history of anarchism as a movement and a philosophy recognizing and embracing the pivotal importance of sexual and gender liberation. Within this history there has been a prominent role of queer anarchist sex radicals who kept this significant engagement at the forefront of the anarchist movement and philosophy. Yet despite the pioneering anarchist sex radicals at the turn of the century and those during the heyday of the (gay, feminist, black) liberation movements of the sixties and seventies, there has been an increasing trend by the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) liberation movement toward embracing the government and its role in regulating sexual and gender behavior. And this current “liberation” movement has worked in complicity with the state simply to broaden and reform the definitions and social norms of sex and gender, as well as focus on the assimilation of LGBT within the State through marriage reform, Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, and by enacting laws that seek to entrench and empower the police and incarceration system through increased funding and engagement through hate crime legislation. And so we see a liberation movement that moved from a focus on fighting the state and its associated systems of corrupt police, politics, and social norms to a liberation model complicit with a state and its allied power structures that makes no excuse regarding its control, regulation, definition of, and legal boundaries regarding, sexual behavior and gender identity and expression.

This chapter details the historical roots of sex and gender radicals within the anarchist movement as well as within other allied liberation movements. From this historical perspective, we can reexamine the state of the LGBT liberation movement, and attempt to solidify and redefine a trans liberation movement outside the current so-called LGBT liberation movement. The aim of this chapter is to reconsider Trans liberation within the contexts of the current social, economic, and political environments within primarily the United States, though given the penetration of a global LGBT movement led by marriage advocates, it can also be viewed from a global lens. In this process, it is hoped to reveal that the core of the trans existence and persona is radical and anarchistic, if not insurrectionary, in its embodiment—such that pure liberation of sex and gender will not come through complicit reform within the state but rather through rejecting the state and its many social constructs. (more…)