Archive for the ‘We fight on’ Category

New Haven Forum
Wednesday, July 19 @ 6:30pm
608 Whitney Ave

Impeach the System!
As the Trump administration takes more and more outrageous reactionary steps, the response from many is that Trump needs to be impeached. Join us to discuss why impeachment is not the solution to overcome the abuse, poverty, bigotry and inequality represented by the Trump administration.

PLUS: Fight the “Alt-Right”!
City after city have been bravely standing up to the growing presense of white supremacy in the US. Recently, New Haven activists and community members also came together to successfully drive out a neo-Nazi group. Join together again to discuss what’s at stake, what the role of the police is in these struggles, and how to ultimately defeat the “alt-right”.

Free event! Refreshments served! Parking lot & street parking available.

Facebook page for this event is HERE.

Just change the names at the start of the song. The words still hang in the air. Listen to the words and get ready. For all outside is the ringing of revolution. My only hope is that that the train finally comes and we know its true. This is a call to action. Let us never  allow them to again use their tricks to stop this movement, to fool us into believing their lies. Here to the revolution! All Power To The People!

 

Furbirdsqueerly stands in full support of this letter and in full support of the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Not Like This — #NoPrideHere
By #BlackLivesMatter NYC

Let us start off by saying that we stand in full solidarity with our siblings of the Toronto Chapter of #BlackLivesMatter. We have been inspired by the strategic moves made by the TO team, including the chapters decision to not attend PRIDE this year in order to spotlight the reality of anti-blackness in all areas of society. PRIDE is shared on the same day in both Toronto and New York City. We like our Toronto comrades, write this public statement to PRIDE NYC organizers, the Gay Officers Action League-NY (GOAL-NY) and the NYPD in declaring the following:

  • the removal of uniformed police and PRIDE-detailed vehicles from the NYC Pride parade. As a human rights organization, GOAL-NY should be addressing the issues of local public safety issues within the NYPD Black and Brown communities across all precincts in NYC especially among those who identify as LGBTIQ, starting with supporting the Right to Know Act
  • a commitment to transform the culture and events of PRIDE to center the lives of of those most marginalized — queer and transgender Black communities.
  • the honoring of our ancestors and elders with true integrity of their radical existence. It was Marsha P. Johnson, a Black transwoman, who was one of the first to resist the attacks on Stonewall Inn by the NYPD. It was Miss Major, a Black transwoman, who continues to stand with the current queer and transgender organizers as we push back against a system that deems us disposable both in life and death.

As many people in NYC fawn over the NYPD’s participation in Pride events, we cannot forget the dangers that one of the biggest military forces poses to Black communities. In standing with BLM-Toronto, we must call to awareness the hyper-militarization of local police. Along with such awareness, we must stomach the death of Mx Bostick; a Black trans woman murdered here in NYC this past spring. We must acknowledge the daily taunting and threat to trans women of color as they ride the train. We must remember that Islan Nettles’ head was bashed into the sidewalk just outside of Precinct 147 in Harlem after a coward realized she was a trans woman.

We know that 92% of those arrested for fare beating are Black & Brown folks, and we have accounts of how trans women, who are among the most impoverished communities, are treated by the NYPD for something as simple as not having $2.75 for public transportation. This is what has led us to work with others in New York City in organizing our #SwipeitForward campaign. We connect the increase in violence against trans women of color to the deaths of Black immigrants like David Felix, murdered by an NYPD detective and his body not claimed for 21-days. We see all of those issues, happening here locally, as a reflection of the racist, transphobic, and homophobic rhetoric we have spewing from those as high up as the White House. (more…)

Police literally drag people away from McConnell’s office as protests break out over GOP bill

People are removed from a sit-in outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office as they protest proposed cuts to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington.   (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

This is a very important article. It is from Liberation School and a comrade of ours posted it on facebook. A lot has been said about cops and their role in society and this article sums it up quite nicely. Here is the opening paragraph:

Cops: Enforcers for the Capitalist Class.

“For decades, into the 1980s, school districts across the country employed the “Officer Friendly” program that brought local cops into kindergarten and first-grade classrooms. Their point was obvious: to “educate” children with the belief that the police are an indispensable part of society, who not only uphold the law but heroically protect them.
This idealized concept of police has to be pushed upon workers at every turn because so much of their real-life experiences show the truth, which is the opposite: that the police function as an organized instrument of state repression.”

and further in the article this:

Historically the police are always used to break strikes and assault picket lines where workers are struggling for rights and better conditions. The cops repressed workers who fought for the eight-hour workday because it was in the interest of the capitalist class to hold onto the highest rate of exploitation possible. But not only have the police functioned to defend the capitalist’ profits they have also functioned, most importantly, to defend the system itself from being politically challenged and overturned. (more…)

Those few words indeed sum up the nights in June 1969 of the Stonewall Rebellion. The words were spoken by Storme’ DeLarverie. Many thanks to Marc Burns for sending us this article.

“She was cut from the movie, his-story was rewritten as usual, but let’s set the record straight (no pun intended): a butch lesbian was responsible for starting the first Stonewall riot at 1:20 a.m. on June 28, 1969. That night, a brave woman of color, Stormé DeLarverie was hit on the head with a billy club and handcuffed. She was bleeding from the head when she brazenly turned to the crowd and hollered, “WHY DON’T YOU DO SOMETHING!?”

After a long struggle, Stormé was dragged into a paddy wagon and that’s when the scene exploded. That summer night a revolution began and it was a strong butch woman of color that is reported to have thrown the first punch. Exactly one year later, on June 28,1970, the first Pride parade took place. It was more of a political demonstration in response to what happened at Stonewall.”The Stonewall Inn was owned and operated by the Mafia. They checked through a peephole before you could enter, and if you weren’t gay, you weren’t getting into the club. When police officers would barge in, it meant trouble. Back then, cross-dressing was illegal and you could be arrested for not wearing a certain number of “gender-appropriate” articles of clothing.

“Stormé DeLarverie, who was born to an African American mother and a white father in the 1920s, performed as a drag king and was one of several “butch” lesbians that fought against the police on the night of the riots. When Stormé threw the very first punch that night, it was in self-defense. “The cop hit me, and I hit him back,” Stormé recounted.”Stormé DeLarverie served the lesbian community for decades as a volunteer street patrol worker. She patrolled the lesbian bars to keep what she lovingly referred to as her “baby girls” safe. She was androgynous, tall, dark, handsome and legally armed. She did this all the way up until she was 80-something-years-old, retiring in the early 2000s. In 2017, there are less than a handful of lesbian bars remaining in the U.S. The last remaining lesbian bar in San Francisco, the Lexington Club, closed its doors in 2015. Stormé is fondly remembered as a “gay superhero”—a fearless protector of the lesbian spaces that have all but gone extinct “Stormé DeLarverie died in her sleep in Brooklyn on May 24, 2014.”

king_storme.jpg (19055 bytes)

Let’s hear it from the Stonewall Vets web site about Storme’

K. Stormé DeLarverie was born ‘way down yonder’ in New Orleans, Louisiana.  It was incredibly not long after the end of World War I (One) on Christmas Eve, December 24 of 1920 — ironically and prophetically, the year that American women won the right to vote in America!  To quote Stormé:  “I’ve been fighting for the Gay community ever since!”  Stormé has a silvery baritone voice with a jazz-oriented sound.  In the 1940s, Stormé was a solo performer with a three-piece band.  Stormé is probably best known for being part of the legendary Jewel Box Revue, a popular “drag” performance group which toured America — not always under the best of accommodations or circumstances.

The Jewel Box Revue ensemble was composed of two dozen males dressed beautifully and seductively as females and one biological female dressed very gentlemanly and convincingly as a man:  Stormé!  It’s a role he does persuasively on stage and off.  During the 1950s and the 1960s, Stormé was the Jewel Box’s only male impersonator.  He did so as a fine gentleman.  The entertaining uniqueness was that the entire talented troupe were in gender-bender roles — all except one!  The “J.B.” was a forerunner to the Broadway musical of the mid-1980s, “La Cage aux Folles”.  Unlike the latter, the J.B. confronted acceptance, joyousness, praise and fulfillment on one side but segregation, prejudice, scorn and sadness on the other side of the coin. (more…)