Archive for the ‘We fight on’ Category

“I was born in a bourgeois community and had some of the better things in life, but I found that there were more people starving than there were people eating, more people that didn’t have clothes than did have clothes, and I just happened to be one of the few. So I decided that I wouldn’t stop doing what I’m doing until all those people are free.”

“I believe I’m going to die doing the things I was born to do. I believe I’m going to die high off the people. I believe I’m going to die a revolutionary in the international revolutionary proletarian struggle.”

From the Hampton Institute.

Folks traveled far and wide to pay their last respects to our namesake, Chairman Fred Hampton. Hampton and Mark Clark were assassinated in a coordinated effort by Chicago PD, Cook County SWAT, and the FBI on this day (December 4) in 1969.

Chairman Fred was 21 years old on the day of his death. He died advocating for “international proletarian revolution”:

“We got to face some facts. That the masses are poor, that the masses belong to what you call the lower class, and when I talk about the masses, I’m talking about the white masses, I’m talking about the black masses, and the brown masses, and the yellow masses, too.

We’ve got to face the fact that some people say you fight fire best with fire, but we say you put fire out best with water. We say you don’t fight racism with racism. We’re gonna fight racism with solidarity. We say you don’t fight capitalism with no black capitalism; you fight capitalism with socialism.”

He died advocating for black liberation via working-class emancipation. He died as a champion for all people. It is in his memory that we carry out this struggle.

In solidarity.

#NeverForget
#PeoplesChamp
#ProletarianRevolution
#RealRecognizeReal

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Someone asked us once why do you always seem to be against some LGBT folks, like HRC, reformists and liberals. Why do you rally against folks in the LGBT community who believe reform is the way to go? Well be certain of one thing, when we see things like the photo we cringe, we are disgusted, and we know fight on! Many thanks to Pink and Black Anarchists for sharing this on their site. You know we have been fighting for years against those who we say have “straightened their genes”, our essays testify to that. We have called for united fronts with other groups since the late 60’s when we were young out of the closet and fighting what we had hoped to be the revolution. We were out to change amerikkka and amerikkka didn’t like us. But you know we are still here and amerikkka has gotten worse. It makes us very happy when the young rise up and breath the truth into the LGBT movement and far beyond. Political queers who will not take the shit handed down to them. Young queers with their heads on their shoulders, queerly as fuck, standing up to those in the movement who just don’t get it. Not afraid to say so, not afraid to speak truth to power. Not satisfied with only LGBT rights but have the answer to that age old saying we are here there and everywhere. So it follows all issues are our issue. Fight on young folks. Fight on Pink and Black Anarchists. Fight on Blue Lives Murder. Fight on Familia TQLM. Fight on Black Lives Matter. Fight on No Justice, No Pride. This time around the revolution must be won!

Posting from Pink and Black Anarchists:

President of LGBT group killed by Campus Police and the liberals came out with this.

Offensive to say the least. This is the “thin blue line” flag, frequently used as a “police lives matter” symbol in direct opposition to BLM.

A while back we wrote in an essay these words:

Cops are just one component of the bourgeoisie’s repressive apparatus for subjugating the working class and anyone else that strays from the bourgeoisie norm.

Historically, cops have been perhaps the #1 most dangerous enemy of gay / trans / queer people for decades, and continue to target us today. Diana’s little Corner in the Nutmeg State recently published an article and had this to say:

“How did the rising at Coopers Donuts (1959), Dewey Lunch (1965), Compton’s Cafeteria (1966), and Stonewall Inn (1969) start?
With polices raids on “homosexuals” where they were checking for three items of male clothing. In other words they were looking for trans people.

“Perhaps no one illustrated potential issues between police and LGBTQ communities more than Nadine Ruff. A transgender woman, Ruff said she had reported a sexual assault to New Haven police but was ridiculed. Ruff said the police response re-victimized her, which she said is an experience that’s too common.

“You need to know about this community,” Ruff said. “We fear police.”

One of the people who commented on this flag with the blue police line and to a supporter of this flag had this to say. (we think it sums it up for anyone who doesn’t know what this is all about.)

“It’s a bad thing because cops are oppressors who have a long history of targeting LGBT groups and individuals, and the murder of an LGBT person should not be tarnished by using it as an opportunity to show support for cops. Further, even aside from this instance, when there are two groups, and one is clearly oppressing the other, posting something like the above flag is essentially saying “Why can’t I support both the oppressors and the oppressed?” which, in its ultimate effect, is the same as saying “I support the oppressors. Fuck the oppressed.”

Lastly, it’s not projecting if it accurately describes your position insofar as you have expressed it. Stop licking police boots.”… Kana Robert Ewing.

This flag and this liberal was responding to the shooting death of Scout Schultz. At the time of Schultz murder we published this essay found HERE.

RIP SCOUT SCHULTZ!

To find out more about Pink and Black Anarchist go to HERE. 

 

The murder of Candace Towns in Macon Georgia marks the 25th reported murder of a trans person in the U.S. in 2017, making it the deadliest year on record for transgender Americans. So far, almost every victim, including Towns, has been a woman of color. Rest in Power Candace we fight on.

We remember this quite well. We stood in support of the Panthers in New Haven along with the Gay Liberation Front of NYC. We know that the government will use any trick in the book to destroy the revolutionary liberation movements and we must stand ready to fight them off. Today the FBI is doing the same with the Black Lives Matter movement and Queers of all colors must stand in support of BLM.

Revolutionary LGBT history: The Black Panthers supported gay rights.

By Serena Freewomyn, as published on the Bilerico Report.

Many people like to criticize the Black Panthers by saying that they were racist, sexist, and/or homophobic, but this is just an attempt to delegitimize one of the most revolutionary organizations this country has ever known. White people especially hold onto these claims and ignore the many social programs that the Panthers provided: health care, free breakfasts for kids, clothing distributions, police patrols . . . the list goes on. This post is not going to be a summary of all the things that the Panthers did for their community. This post is meant as a response to those who would slander the Black Panthers with charges of homophobia and sexism.

In his book We Want Freedom: A Life in the Black Panther Party, Mumia Abu-Jamal deals specifically with the issue of sexism within The Black Panther Party.
The great African American educator and civil rights leader Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955), a major force in the Black women’s club movement in the 1920’s and 30’s, called on women to “go to the front and take our rightful place; fight our battles and claim our victories.” Women tried to do this in the heyday of the Black Liberation movement, as well as during the Civil Rights movement, with varying degrees of success. In these movements, women generally were relegated to subordinate roles and were virtually invisible within the hierarchy of the organizations, even though they provided the bulk of memberships and labor. . . .

It is with a focus on these macho and misogynist attitudes that much of the popular press has examined the role of Black women in the Black Panther Party. in The Shadow of the Panther, Hugh Pearson, who had no discernable background in the Black Liberation movement, and therefore no firsthand knowledge of what he wrote, damned the Black Panther Party’s “routine” mistreatment of women as both wide-ranging and “flagrant.” Peterson relied on three BPP insiders, “those who would never forgive Huey for what he did to the party,” and on “nonblacks who had been affiliated with Newton and the party,” whom he found to be the “easiest” sources for him to interview. It is not surprising that he comes to flawed conclusions upon these limited and biased sources. . . .
While it may be proper to be sharply critical of the Black Liberation movement generally, it is also proper to give credit where credit is due. For the undeniable truth is that the Black Panther Party, for ideological reasons and for reasons of sheer survival, gave the women of the BPP far more opportunities to lead and to influence the organization than any of its contemporaries, in white or Black radical formations. . . .

And point seven of the BPP 8 Points of Attention in the Party’s rules states, “Do not take liberties with women,” showing an awareness that sexual misconduct must be confronted within the Party. Kathleen Cleaver writes, “In 1970 the Black Panther Party took a formal position on the liberation of women. Did the U.S. Congress make any statement on the liberation of women? . . . Did the Oakland police issue a position against gender discrimination?” (p. 159-162) (more…)

Yes we are old fashion we refuse to use (his)-story month. Its all of ours not just his so we use ourstory. Let’s begin with the great sign.

and may we add fuck you if you don’t like it.