Archive for the ‘We remember’ Category

2016 Digital Be-In poster, feat

For a great article, Big Shebang for Human Be-In written by Caitlin Donohue published on 48 Hills 1/12/2017 go to HERE.

For more info see HERE.

“It is deeply disturbing that Jeff Sessions, who has such clear animus against so many Americans — including the LGBTQ community, women and people of color — could be charged with running the very system of justice designed to protect them,” Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, said in a statement.

“When Donald Trump was elected, he promised to be president for all Americans, and it is hugely concerning and telling that he would choose a man so consistently opposed to equality as one of his first — and most important — cabinet appointees,” Griffin added.

Sessions’ track record on LGBTQ issues has consistently earned him low marks from the Human Rights Campaign. The group gave him a zero on itsCongressional scorecard and gave him a spot on its “Hall of Shame” in 2014, which included just 19 members of Congress.

For more on this go to: NBC OUT at HERE

Note

With Donald Trump and Mike Pence in the White House, the GOP firmly in control of Congress, and a Supreme Court ruled by a right-wing majority, we can expect attacks against the rights of the LGBT community. Our progress toward marriage equality will be under assault, and they may consider laws and judgments to allow discrimination against LGBT Americans personally and in the workplace. We can forget about any ENDA bill or protections for our Trans sisters and brothers. Sending it all back to the state will not do as we will lose all of the federal benefits that marriage brings.

Queers Get Out into the streets you have a hell of a lot to lose.   “Clara Guy once said Its all over but the fighting.”

Harry Hay a founder of the Mattachine Society and early gay rights advocate once said: “You may think that you are not noticeable. But they know who you are. They know your’re a degenerate, and they’ve never forgotten that. You won’t find that out until the push come to shove. And then you’ll find out real fast. Because they’re respectable in the eyes of God and you aren’t.  Remember a law is a law. It can be voted out. It can be voted in and stay in as long as you have the majority. And where do you have the majority? You kid yourself. If people become frightened, if they feel they are losing, then the blame will be spread around as they have nothing to hang on to and they will listen to some of the most frightening people.”

“Always remember that we are other than they. We must always remember that tolerance can very quickly turn into persecution.”..Harry Hay interview with Anne-Marie Cusac, The Progressive, September 1998.

 

Transgender Day of Remembrance * MCC Hartford

6:00pm Sunday, November 20, 2016

Hosted by the Metropolitan Community Church of Hartford

155 Wyllys Street, Hartford CT 06106

(Parish House, Church of the Good Shepherd, entrance in the back)

 Office: (860)724-4605

www.mcchartford.com

Candlelight vigil

Guest speakers

Music

Reception

This is a day we set aside each year to memorialize those whose lives were lost by anti-transgender fear, bigotry, and hatred.  On this day around the world, communities gather in vigils to remember those who have been murdered in the past year simply for being who they are; we gather in compassion, inspired by the progress made; and, we gather in hope with a promise to work together toward a society that truly values acceptance, inclusion, justice, and love.

Join us for a night of community, compassion, and hope.

This event is FREE

Protesters crossing Millennium Bridge en route to Tate Modern (all photos by and courtesy Charlotte Bell)

Protesters crossing Millennium Bridge en route to Tate Modern (all photos by and courtesy Charlotte Bell)

Protesters Demand “Where Is Ana Mendieta?” in Tate Modern Espansion.

by Isabella Smith.

Ana Mendieta has long been one of our favorite artists, we like many were shocked at her death and at the acquittal of Carl Andre. We of course were not in London and if we were we would be with the marchers. Thank you to Ms. Smith and to the marchers for keeping the memory of Ana alive and to Hyperallergic for printing the article. Some excerpts from the article by Ms. Smith.

“LONDON — Posters all around London advertising Tate Modern’s new building proudly proclaim: “Art Changes. We Change.” For the protestors who gathered outside the artists’ preview of the extension last night, too little has changed. Members of the activist groupsWHEREISANAMENDIETA and Sisters Uncut were on hand to protest the inclusion of Minimalist Carl Andre’s work in the museum’s extension, and the exclusion of Ana Mendieta’s work.

Clad in black and clutching roses as if for a funeral, protesters gathered on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral before walking across Millennium Bridge to Tate Modern. Three slogans were chanted continuously: “OI TATE, WE’VE GOT A VENDETTA – WHERE THE FUCK IS ANA MENDIETA?”, “ANDRE, ANDRE, ANDRE, WHAT YOU GONNA DO, WHAT YOU GONNA DO WHEN WE COME FOR YOU?”, and, chillingly, “I WAS PUSHED — I DID NOT FALL.” Attending as both a supporter and a journalist, I joined the crowd. We formed a line across the entrance to Tate’s Turbine Hall before slipping under the cordons and rushing to the cavernous space’s glass doors.”  to read the rest of the article go to HERE.

 

On March 29, 2015 this site published Judy James piece, Spray Paint, Stonefield, Carl Andre. We Wish Ana Mendieta Were Still Alive. See here.

 

 

In from Solidarity, a Socialist Feminist anti racist organization.

Black history is queer history is revolutionary history! Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992) was a leader of the Queer Liberation Movement in New York City for decades; from the Stonewall Rebellion to ACT-UP and many struggles in between. Johnson was a founder of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), a group that helped spearhead the militant demonstrations of the early 1970s. Johnson’s body was found in the Hudson River in 1992. Police claimed it was suicide but many activists strongly disagreed. Long Live the Rebel Spirit of Marsha P. Johnson!

Black history is queer history is revolutionary history! Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992) was a leader of the Queer Liberation Movement in New York City for decades; from the Stonewall Rebellion to ACT-UP and many struggles in between. Johnson was a founder of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries), a group that helped spearhead the militant demonstrations of the early 1970s. Johnson's body was found in the Hudson River in 1992. Police claimed it was suicide but many activists strongly disagreed. Long Live the Rebel Spirit of Marsha P. Johnson!
Check out this wonderful documentary from Frameline.

violence agains trans women 2

This excellent article comes our way from Buzz Feed. Written by Tony Merevick about the murder of Islan Nettles it also contains a Timeline of more than 20 incidents of violence against Transgender people since Islan Nettles died on August 22, 2014. We mourn the loss of all of our Trans sisters and promise like the old union saying went , to fight like hell for the living.

Mr. Merevick’s artice, A Year Later, “Nothing” Has Changed Since Transgender Woman Islan Nettles Was Killed, is an article that we should all read. Mr. Merevick begins the article this way:

“When Islan Nettles, a 21-year-old black transgender woman, was brutally beaten near a New York City police station in Harlem and later died from her injuries on Aug. 22, 2013, transgender activists, LGBT and anti-violence advocates, public officials, and allies took to the streets to demand justice and an end to the staggering amount of violence perpetrated against transgender people.

But a year after Nettles’ death, many in the transgender community say that justice has not been served, and that despite their calls for action and recent strides in the visibility of transgender Americans, nothing has changed to reduce violence against their transgender brothers and sisters both in New York and nationally. They still feel endangered.”

To read the full article and to look over the Timeline go to Buzz Feed, “A Year Later, “Nothing” Has Changed Since Transgender Woman Islan Nettles Was Killed.” The only thing that has changed is that more of our sisters have been killed and that we must work harder to stop this violence.

We thank Tony Merevick for this article and the beautiful tribute to our sisters murdered by hate.

Let us never forget. Words from Laverne Cox.

Islan Nettles Rest In Power.

A year ago today ‪#‎IslanNettles‬ was beaten into a coma simply for walking down the street as herself, ‪#‎WalkingWhileTrans‬. 5 days later she was pronounced brain dead and taken off life support. A year later there has yet to be an arrest for the brutal, vicious and transphobic death of this young woman, this young black woman. As the events in Ferguson, MO have unfolded this week I couldn’t help but think about Islan Nettles, Mia Henderson and the many black trans women who have been murdered with no justice for their lives, there only offense daring to leave the house as themselves. I couldn’t help but think of CeCe McDonald and Monica Jones and all the black trans women who have been treated unjustedly by law enforcement and the criminal justice system. How do we move past a culture of violence and create a world where we are all safe regardless of race, gender, economic status, sexual orientation, religion, ability, immigration status? What does true accountability look like when folks are treated unjustly?

To learn more about Islan’s case please read this article:
http://www.out.com/news-opinion/2014/03/04/islan-nettles-trans-woman-nyc?page=full