Archive for the ‘We remember’ Category

Posted by Marke B in 48Hills.

It’s been a long and winding road to bring a celebration of the 50th Summer of Love to the park — permit kuffufles, safety glitches, and communication frustrations abounded in the cosmic quest to feed the heads. But finally the huge, fifth annual Peace in the Park (Sat/23, 11am-6pm) is gonna be THE ONE — and it even features the valiant Boots Hughston, who tried so many times to make it happen during the actual summer.
This half-century long-hair blowout (not to be confused with the Human Be-In, which held a peaceful, oddly tech-funded 50th commemoration festival of its own this past January) promises to fulfill everyone’s dreams of spiritual connection, and perhaps a little astral projection, on the Music Concourse. Swing by before Folsom Street Fair and witness a whole different kind of Electric Ladyland.

(We just had to add this still wonderful song by Scott McKenzie)

FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL!!!
Some performers include: Wavy Gravy; Katdelic; Pamela Parker, Diamond Dave; Alstar Family Band feat. Mark Karan, Jordan Feinstein, Sunshine (Garcia) Becker, and Robin Sylvester; Michael Pritchard; Laxman Panthi; Third Thursday Band Feat. Kevbot (Kevin Lash); Temple of Isis Feat. Jil Love Revolution; Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D; Milton Rosenberg; SOUL Twin Messiah, Peace Awards with Bill McCarthy, Boots Hughston, Catherine Enny, Michael Gosney, and others
The time is NOW to come out for peace! Let’s honor and celebrate the 50th anniversary of “THE” Summer of Love! Join us, with flowers in your hair! Enjoy a sunny September day at Music Concourse of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, California on 9/23. Bring the kids, celebrate peace, get crafty, be artistic, relax with gentle yoga, chill to live music, find some zen with other meditators, and leave happier, refreshed, and connected to your inner calm. Vegetarian food stalls like Amma’s Kitchen & Donna’s Tamales available!
Partners include: Brahma Kumaris, SOUL – Summer of Unconditional Love, Peaceful World Foundation, Baha’i Faith, PeaceDay Global Broadcast, PeaceDaySF, CODEPINK: Women For Peace, Peaceday.tv, Earthdance Global, and San Francisco Recreation & Parks Department.

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We republish this piece written last year on this date. For Victor Jara and all of the victims of the Military Junta in Chile.

Plegaria a un labrador

Public Prayer for a worker.

Public Prayer to a Worker

Stand up, look at the mountains
Source of the wind, the sun, the water
You, who change the course of rivers,
Who, with the seed, sow the flight of your soul,
Stand up, look at your hands,
Give to your hand to your brother so you can grow.
We’ll go together, united by blood,
Today is the day
We can make the future.
Deliver us from the master
who keeps us in misery.
The kingdom of justice and equality come.
Blow, like the wind blows
the wild flowers of the mountain pass.

Clean the barrel of my gun like fire
They will be done at last on earth
Give us your strength and courage to struggle.
Blow, like the wind blows
the wild flowers of the mountain pas

Clean the barrel of my gun like fire
Stand up, look at your hands,
Give to your hand to your brother so you can grow.
We’ll go together, united by blood,
Now and in the hour of our death.
Amen.

The following is a beautiful poem written by Adrian Mitchell and set to music by Arlo Guthrie about the life of Victor Jara.

read up on Victor in the following essay:

The Life of Victor Jara, from Marxism Leninism Today.

Victor Jara was machine-gunned to death. His body, and four other victims, were later found dumped near a railroad track outside a cemetery (one of the victims remains unidentified).

According to the autopsy report, he had been shot 44 times.

The special military unit who massacred Jara and many other political activists became known as the “Caravan of Death” and flew across the country in helicopters executing trade unionists, leftists and members of the Communist Party of Chile, and many other progressives like liberation theology priests.  More than 3,000 people were killed or went missing during the US-supported military dictatorship in Chile, from 1973 to 1990.

“With that same strength our collective fist / Will strike again some day.”..Victor Jara (more…)

Minnie Coe, she is a sister of Alice as you may know, sent us a request that we republish a work that she has enjoyed over the years. We said “oh, okay, why not,” we like Minnie, Alice, Mary and Jake friends of ours since the early days when we all ran around Goon City as hippie artists. We looked through our works that she suggested and hit on one that when first published by Queerartist that everyone enjoyed when it was first published.

Here is one of our favorites. Minnie will remember feeding apples to old man Nichole’s cows, teasing the cow with more and running so it would chase us . We hid up a tree until the cow left and then beat it home.

Don’t eat this cow! Save this pancake!

These are the end times and all sorts of end times signs and symbols are popping up. A week or so ago the Virgin Mary was spotted in a Thanksgiving morning pancake, she was seen a month ago in a tree, and then appeared in a fried egg. That gal sure likes to travel. Of course Jesus gets into the act every once in a while and appears in all sorts of odd places. The best was on the screen door. My poor grandmother had just come into the kitchen and low and behold there he was staring back at her. At first she thought it was a hobo who had come up from the railroad track and wanted something to eat, but no she said I have seen that face before staring back at me from the altar of the Swedish church. THATS!!! JESUS! Everyone thought she was crazy except old Ben Jones who bought the screen door from her and put it in his Miracle Museum. Ben charged just a quarter to come in and see some of his miracle collection. Now old Ben Jones has gone on to his great reward, his museum is closed and the items he spent a life time collecting are scattered hither and yon.

Now I don’t know who this is but someone told me its Michael Jackson not the Virgin Mary.

A most blessed event. Someone is watching.

Word was in yesterday that a divine miracle has happened on a farm here in North East. A calf has been born with the sign of the cross on his forehead. Already thousands are making a pilgrimage to the farm to see what wondrous signs have come down from on high. Nobody knows what it all means but by god it must mean something.  I don’t want to make too much fun of this just in case there are any divine creatures flying around out there looking for something to smitten. Not me I will stay a mile away. So enjoy the video of this little Holy Cow. Born a few weeks before Christmas and celebrated as a miracle to some and to others just another cow born on another day, in another week.  Moo Moo Moo.

A cross on the forehead of Moses the calf.

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This collection contains essays on LGBT Liberation.

1.We Take No Pride Leaflet passed out a Pride in 2002.

2. Political Pride Federal Building, 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Queers Without Borders Pride Leaflet, not dated.

4. No Drag Queens at Stonewall you say? We say take a flying fuck.

5. Two very important essays containing information on the history of our movement here in Ct. Found HERE.

6. Holy Matrimony Batman, essay by Jeri Marie Liesegang.

7. Somewhere along the way the movement for liberation  was hijacked and these, marriage and the right to serve in the military became the cause of the moment. Yes, we know straights will like you better if you’re just like them and please don’t forget the only difference is what you do in bed.  10 Essays on Marriage and the Military.

New York City. 1970

Well us old gals are at it again. Traveling in search of a new home. This should be our last trip. We have contacts who have contacts who are in the know of where to live and where to go. Where to stay away from and where to check out.  Someone told us Vermont is full of cows, well we said even if we don’t drink milk, eat cheese or ice cream we love cows. Bonnie said with giggles, “you should see the place during rush hour, cows here, cows there, cows everywhere.” Yeah okay we will be in the city where we are sure there are very few cows. We’ll see some cows from the train give them a moo moo and be glad we don’t have to clean the barn. We love cows even if they do a job on the ozone. “I have to wonder,” said Bessy Marie, “do cows ever escape the field and come and stand on the train tracks?” I really hope they don’t as the train has no cow catcher in the front of it and if we hit such a creature it would be all over for the cow and cause delays. ( 1 ) Let’s hope not said Olga, lets hope the cows know where they at suppose to be and if they go anywhere else they will not hear the dinner bell. Here is a little song to start us on our way.

I am Cow, by Arrogant Worms.

Rush Hour In Vermont.

 

Lots of these on our trip. No worry the train is only 5 cars long. We were happy we weren’t waiting to cross the road or go on through to the other side of the tracks in Springfield as there was a freight train with almost 75 cars passing by.

The train route

Image result for amtrak train the vermonter

We know that by the time the train gets to us the bathrooms can be and usually are very smelly. Olga is the smart one in the bunch always brings a mask to wear when she is in the toilet. I just can’t sit there and smell that horrid smell, do my business and not have vomited all over the floor. Then the train folks would have another mess to clean up. So I get one of those masks fold it up keep in in my pocket along with a Lysol wipe or two. No telling what germs lurk around in the train. Germs are a funny thing can’t see them but if they get into you man can they do a job. Both of us gals are too old for that and thank our lucky stars we haven’t contracted anything this past winter on top of what either one of us have all ready. We take our Elderberry syrup each and every day. Getting old, now that is a whole other story. We don’t know too many old folks to sit around with and talk about getting old. I wish we did as then we would say, “Hey we don’t have it all that bad.” At the very least we would know what this getting old is all about and if this or that pain is worth complaining about. Maybe it will go away in a couple of days.

Image result for amtrak train the vermonter

Gals like us love the train. Having never learned to drive we take it all the time. You know the things you see on the train are much different than what you see in a car whizzing by at 60 miles per hour. These highways leave a lot to be desired as far as good scenery is concerned. Trees, cars, trees, cars. We love the train we get to see the backside of the cities, usually the older part, the graffiti along the tracks is always something to marvel at, an art show caught out of the corner of our eyes and then it retreats into the distant. Last time we were amazed at all of the mullein patches along the tracks. Huge Mullein plants, skunk cabbage, and ferns, ferns, ferns all along the tracks edge and into the woods. Something we very rarely see around these parts are white birch trees. The white lines among the green and brown, lovely. We came home last year in October and what a site to see out the windows of the trees changing colors. Never saw such beauty. What will we see in the spring time wondered Bessy Marie, of course we will be north and hopefully the gardens of tulips near the State Capitol will be in bloom. (more…)

Jordan Edwards

Jordan Edwards

From Afro Punk

In their first statement following Jordan Edwards’ death, the 15-year-old’s family called him a “loving child with a humble and sharing spirit.”

The statement also said he had an indescribably strong bond with his family, especially his siblings. The family said his brothers witnessed Jordan’s death.

“Not only have Jordan’s brothers lost their best friend; they witnessed firsthand his violent, senseless, murder,” the statement reads. “Their young lives will forever be altered. No one, let alone young children, should witness such horrific, unexplainable, violence.”

The family asked the public to refrain from protests and marches in Jordan’s name as they prepare for his funeral. “We do not support nor do we condone any violence or threats made against the Balch Springs Police Department or any other law enforcement agencies.” (more…)

This wonderful review of Clara Bingham’s book is a must read.
Witness to the Revolution: Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year American Lost Its Mind and Found Its Soul by Clara Bingham (Random House, 2016)
Review by Andy Piascik
 
Witness to the Revolution: Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year American Lost Its Mind and Found Its Soul by Clara Bingham is a valuable contribution to further understanding and popularizing the radical upsurge of the 1960s. The book is an oral history and we hear from well-known figures of the time such as Ericka Huggins, Tom Hayden and Robin Morgan as well as others like Vivian Rothstein, Wesley Brown and Jan Barry who did significant work mostly behind the scenes in one or more of the movements that together made up The Movement. Though the focus of the book is the one-year period from the summer of 1969 to the summer of 1970, the interviews cover ground going back much earlier and thus provide many important insights about context and individual development.
The primary focus of Witness to the Revolution is the movement against the war in Vietnam. There’s a great deal about the white Left as well as the counterculture and nothing about free jazz, DRUM, AIM, Stonewall or Black Arts. This was a conscious choice. The author explains in an Introduction that Witness to the Revolution is “a selective history” and the book “touches only lightly on the black experience, feminism, and the music scene” because there “just wasn’t room enough in one book.”
Even within that dramatically reduced landscape, Bingham covers a great deal of ground. Many of the seminal events of that one-year period are explored in depth: the Chicago Conspiracy Trial, Kent State, the Resistance, the extensive activism at the University of Wisconsin up through and including the bombing of the Army-Math building, Woodstock, Jackson State, the expose of the massacre at My Lai, Altamont, the Pentagon Papers and more.
Vietnam Vets
Some of the best sections of the book are the stories of the Vietnam veterans who came home and built organizations in opposition to the war. They did so as they often struggled with serious physical and psychological problems while having to live the rest of their lives with memories of atrocities they observed and sometimes participated in. As the interviews reveal, some vets found a degree of healing through activism. Others expanded popular awareness of the true nature of the war by shedding valuable light on war crimes by way of investigative reporters like Seymour Hersh.
Throughout, Witness to the Revolution repeatedly underscores how much vitriol some had to endure as elites attacked both the messengers and the message in the student, vet, Black Power and anti-war movements. Even as late as 1970, when many in the upper levels of government, business and planning had concluded that Vietnam was lost, those who showed that the war was not a righteous cause gone awry but consistent with U.S. foreign policy different only in scale were spied upon, harassed, imprisoned and killed.
Popular Power
As elites today move dramatically to make dissent ever more costly and dangerous, it is  inspiring to read of the courage and endurance of those from an earlier time of discord. Fundamental to the success in stopping the war as well as resisting attempts to suppress dissent were the existence of massive movements of a galvanized population that was in many ways at war with its own government. One of the book’s biggest strengths is that the power of the collective Movement is always present even when it’s not front and center. And while Witness to the Revolution was published before the ascension of Trump, the thread linking the popular power of the time to the tasks we confront today is inescapable.
There are anecdotes and surprises both amusing and moving. It’s hilarious in the extreme, for example, to imagine Mick Jagger’s reaction to the vision some had of the concert that became Altamont, as recounted by Peter Coyote, as that of a collective experience where the Rolling Stones would be one of five acts performing simultaneously on separate stages. We also hear poignantly if indirectly from Stephanie Fassnacht, the widow of Robert Fassnacht, the graduate student killed in the Army-Math bombing. Bingham also provides important history of organizations and efforts such as that of the Diggers that deserve more attention and which may stimulate greater exploration by others.
Bingham’s introductory qualifier notwithstanding, it is still unfortunate that she excluded important pieces of the history of that time. This is especially so since she devotes so much space to the sorry tale of the completely marginal Weather Underground. Lots of people worked to stop the war in Vietnam even if that may not have been the specific focus of their activism; couldn’t we have heard something from some combination of Elizabeth Martinez, Mike Hamlin, Frances Beal and Dennis Banks? Maybe a little something about the August 29th Chicano Moratorium, which was within the time frame Bingham covers and drew upwards of 25,000 people to the streets of Los Angeles?
 Instead we once again get page after page of Mark Rudd, Bernardine Dohrn and Bill Ayers. Rudd’s regrets and likening of himself to a police agent are to his credit; too bad the Weather Underground’s story couldn’t have been left at that and some space been granted to the original Rainbow Coalition, say, that was working at the same time and in the same city where Rudd and his comrades were carrying out the senseless Days of Rage. Juan Gonzalez is quite visible and not difficult to locate; wouldn’t it have been more valuable to hear him on his experiences both as a student activist at Columbia and as a leading figure in the Young Lords?

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